how to transfer HDD space between drives

February 22, 2011 at 01:35:51
Specs: Windows 7
My C drive is full while I have 208gb space in the D drive.How I can transfer the space to C trive.

Also it seems every thing is getting stored on the C drive , how I can change it so that all the non programme file stored on the D drive.

Thanks


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#1
February 22, 2011 at 03:03:50
Drive C is for os and programs, drive D is for your personal files. If u have non system files(music, movies) transfer them to drive D.
use partion magic to increase space for drive C.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#2
February 22, 2011 at 03:55:57
Thanks

It looks like that all my personal files are getting stored on the C drive, How I can change this so that all my data /files getting stored on the D drive.

Your response would be much appreciated, you can see that I am a computer
expert.


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#3
February 22, 2011 at 07:40:59
Your data is being stored on the C: drive because that's where YOU are putting it. It's not a computer problem, it's a user problem. Start using the D: drive.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 22, 2011 at 07:59:49
hi
How should I put the data on the D drive? what I have to change in the setting? I have not made any changes since I bought the computer, it runs on the W 7

Thanks


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#5
February 22, 2011 at 12:43:38
kuwese said

"use partion magic to increase space for drive C."

PowerQuest's Partition Magic or Symantec's Norton Partition Magic is ancient and cannot recognize the slightly different NTFS version made in Vista or Windows 7 properly. You can only fix that if you're dual booting XP and Vista or Windows 7, you load the Recovery Console from the XP CD, choose the XP Windows installation, then you run CHKDSK /R for the partition drive letter the Vista or Windows 7 NTFS partition Windows installation is on.

Vista and Windows 7 have the built in ability to shrink, or increase (if there is un-allocated space made available on the same physical hard drive) the size of hard drive partitions.

Or, you can use newer third party "partition manipulation" programs that can recognize the NTFS version Vista and Windows 7 uses properly.
E.g. the freeware Easeus Partition Master Home Edition.
........

If you DO have a brand name system that has it's original software installation on it, intact, if it has only one physical hard drive, the hard drive has at least one other smaller partition on it other than the large one you see as C in Windows. In that case, the brand name either chooses to not show the other smaller partition as D in Windows, or it does but you are either not allowed to add data or change data on it, or you are strongly discouraged from doing so.
In that case you can't install anything on D, or delete the data on D so you can do that, unless you're not concerned about possibly not being able to install the original contents of the C partition by using the data on the D partition that the brand name placed there.

If you DO NOT have a brand name system that has it's original software installation on it, or if you do but the original data contents of D on the same hard drive as Windows is on have been deleted...

"Your data is being stored on the C: drive because that's where YOU are putting it."

If you have more than one hard drive partition you can install data on, you DO NOT have to install most programs that did not come with Windows on the C partition. In most cases, you can choose something other than the default installation location on the C partition, when you choose something other than the default Express or similar installation, such as Custom, or you can change just the drive letter at the beginning of the default installation location to that of another hard drive partition.In that case, the vast majority of the data is installed on the other partition, and only a little necessary data is installed on the C partition.
You can install things, or copy things to and delete the original file, other than programs that are already installed on C, on / onto any available hard drive partition that you can install data on - e.g. documents, music, pictures, videos, movies.
You can un-install programs already installed on C, then install them again on another hard drive partition, although you may need to back up personal data for those programs if you don't want to lose than data BEFORE you un-install the program.

Where is the logical D drive ?

Do you have only one physical hard drive and D is on the same physical hard drive, or do you have two physical hard drives ?


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#6
February 25, 2011 at 13:50:31
Hi
Thanks for your response.

Is there any I can transfer some of the space from the D drive to C drive without using recovery disc/new windows ( as I have ~200gb free space on the D drive.

Thanks


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#7
February 25, 2011 at 15:12:50
Did you READ response 5 ??

You don't have to change the size of the partitions at all ! You can just re-distribute the data you already have to free up more space on C without any risk !

It's recommended that you back up personal data that you DO NOT want to lose to somewhere other than the same physical hard drive BEFORE you change the size of partitions.

You haven't commented enough about what I've / we've said.

I don't know what you have.

If you have a generic desktop system, or any desktop system, the easiest way to fix your problem is to install another (second, or replacement) hard drive larger than the one you presently have.

Even if you have a laptop, that's the best solution - buy a larger capacity hard drive.

You can use free software available on one of the hard drive brand's (the brand(s) on your system's) web site that can copy the entire contents of a single physical hard drive to a larger one, automatically making the individual partitions larger.
There is next to NO risk to your existing data when you do that.
If you have a laptop, you also need to use an external drive enclosure (I recommend Vantec) with the new drive in it, or some other type of USB to hard drive adapter with the new drive, to be able to copy the data. Both are inexpensive
.......

If the D partition is on the same physical hard drive as the C partition,
- and this is a generic system
- or - if you have a brand name system and you don't care about the data already placed on D by the brand name system builder if that applies, or if that's already been deleted and replaced with other data

then you can either

- use the built ability of Windows 7 to shrink the D partition at the side adjacent to the C partition to make un-allocated space available, then increase the size of the C partition at the side adajacent to the un-allocated space to use that un-allocated space that was made available.

There's not much Help info in Windows itself about that but there are tutorials about how to do that on the web.

- or - you use something such as the freeware Easeus Partition Master to do the same thing. See the Help in that.

You can see the existing partitions on a single physical hard drive in Disk Management in Windows, even ones that are not visible in Computer or Windows Explorer. If you have a brand name system you may find at least one partition that is normally hidden there.That's also where you can shrink and increase the size of partitions.


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#8
February 26, 2011 at 01:31:11
Hi Tubesendwire

Thank you for your advice, I have W7 and all the setting are as they came with Asus laptop , the hard drive in two part C & D , C drive was full while D was empty.

I found out that all my bbc i players downloads were stored in my C drive, for some reason these downloads never get deleted. I deleted these video files and managed to get ~40GB space free. so problem solved.

You can see that I do not know very much about the computers .

I found your advice was very useful and thank very much.

Hope this problem doesn't occur again.

Thanks

Englishmash


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