How to start in Safe Mde?

Acer Acer aspire am5641-u5520a desktop c...
July 30, 2010 at 04:56:00
Specs: Windows Vista Home Premium
Graphic card NVIDIA GeForce 9600GS not detacted after unplugged and replugged.

See More: How to start in Safe Mde?

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#1
July 30, 2010 at 05:01:35
ur question has nothing to do with safe mode or should i say ur problem
to answer ur question just when u boot keep hittiing F5 on ur keyboard
and the card is not detected due to u not plugging it corectly or ur psu is weak to handle it or the card is faulty
or u did not install the driver

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#2
July 30, 2010 at 06:48:46
Tnx mate.
F5 to enter safe mode noted.
Just noticed Device Manager displays GeForce 7100 insted of 9600. Should I uninstall 7100 drv and install 9600 drv.
Incidentally, monitor is working from onbard VGA port. Is this the GeForce 7100 shown?
Tnx again

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#3
July 30, 2010 at 08:00:21
-uninstall onboard video driver.
-Go to bios, return shared memory and disable igp
-set initial display to pci express
-save settings and shutdown the system
-remove power cord and install video card to pci-e x16 slot.
-Connect vga/hdmi/dvi cable to a video card.
-plug power cord and start the system then install v-card driver (the latest driver can be found from nvidia website)

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Related Solutions

#4
July 30, 2010 at 08:20:27
When you are going to be changing a video adapter that's installed in a mboard slot, you are always supposed to un-install the drivers and associated software for the previous video adapter such that the video in Windows is in a basic VGA mode of some sort, BEFORE you install the new video adapter. Not doing so often causes problems just like you're having.

You need to un-install the previous video software, however, you sometimes cannot do that in Safe mode.

If you get a message that the software cannot be un-installed in Safe mode, see below.
.........

Unless the instructions for installing a device tell you otherwise......
(this ALWAYS applies to video adapter software.....) .
You DO NOT install drivers for a device while booting into Windows, if the software for the device has not been installed yet - when Windows detects a generic device or New Hardware while booting, you allow it to search for drivers, it doesn't find any, and it wants you to show it the location of the drivers - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.

The same applies no matter when Windows finds New Hardware !

(The following also applies if you want to re-install the video software, or un-install software for a previous video adapter)

If you DID install drivers that way, go to Control Panel - Classic View - Programs and Features and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting.

If there was nothing to Un-install there, or on any case, look in Device Manager (reboot at least once first if there was something to Un-install there) , and if the sound device is still listed, RIGHT click on it and Un-install it (that may take a while).
If it was still listed in Device manager, reboot at least once after you have un-installed it.
DO NOT install drivers while booting, and then install the sound software the right way !

Where is Device Manager in Vista and Windows 7 ?

Double click on the Computer icon, click on System properties in the top bar, Device Manager is on the left.
.......

If you get a message that the software cannot be un-installed in Safe mode....

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs you have in drives.
Remove any flash drives plugged into USB ports (when the computer is off, or after you have clicked on the Safely Remove Hardware icon and STOPPED accessing the flash drive(s) in Windows).

Press F8 repeatedly while booting, do not hold down the key, and choose....

Enable low-resolution video.

That loads Windows normally except it forces Windows to basic VGA drivers - you can do everything in that mode that you can do when you boot normally.

Safe mode loads those basic VGA drivers too, but it also doesn't load a lot of things that areloaded when you boot normally.


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#5
July 30, 2010 at 10:18:38
Actually, it's F8 to get to the Safe Mode option

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#6
July 30, 2010 at 10:19:24
"Actually, it's F8 to get to the Safe Mode option"

Yes, true. All pressing F5 while booting seems to do when you have Vista is give you a choice of which operating system to boot normally - if you have only one installtion, there's no point in using it.
........

You MUST connect a PCI-E power connector (probably 6 pin) from the power supply to the socket for that on the 9600 card.
Do that ONLY when the AC power to the PS has been removed.
If the card has an 8 pin socket, either a 6 pin, or a 6pin / 2 pin combo, or an 8 pin PCI-E connector from PS will work with the card.

If that was NOT plugged in, you probably won't get any video from the card, or if you do it won't work properly in at least some situations, and the onboard video will probably NOT be automatically disabled by installing the card in the PCI-E slot.

IMPORTANT
Your original power supply does not have enough capacity to support using a 9600 card. The card may work anyway intially and for a while, but the PS will be overloaded and will eventually be damaged - if it fails completely, the PS may damage the mboard while failing.

Aspire M5640 series support
http://support.acer.com/us/en/acerp...

Specs
http://support.acer.com/acerpanam/d...

System Chipset NVIDIA® GeForce® 7100 and nForce® 630i

Video
Integrated NVIDIA® GeForce® 7100 graphics solution
PCI Express® x16 graphics card support

Power Supply Industry Standard 300 Watt
.....

An example of the minimum required PS your system must have to support using a Geforce 9600 chipset card:

Minimum of a 400 Watt power supply (Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 26 Amps.)
http://www.directcanada.com/product...
.......

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

In this case, that's a minimum 400 Watt power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 26 Amps, or more

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

In this case, that's a minimum 500 watt power supply.

If you need to get a PS with more capacity, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
.......................................................................................

Kuwese and KoMo Tan

Kuwese said:

"-uninstall onboard video driver.
-Go to bios, return shared memory and disable igp
-set initial display to pci express
-save settings and shutdown the system
-remove power cord and install video card to pci-e x16 slot.
-Connect vga/hdmi/dvi cable to a video card.
-plug power cord and start the system then install v-card driver (the latest driver can be found from nvidia website) "

This mboard has:

System Chipset NVIDIA® GeForce® 7100 and nForce® 630i

Video
Integrated NVIDIA® GeForce® 7100 graphics solution
PCI Express® x16 graphics card support
(an available PCI-E X16 slot)

"-uninstall onboard video driver.
-Go to bios, return shared memory and disable igp"

Usually you do NOT need to un-install onboard video drivers, because when you install a PCI-E X16 (or AGP) card the bios automatically disables onboard video, and when it does, the bios ignores settings in the bios Setup regarding sharing memory with the onboard video, and Windows does not load the drivers for the onboard video when it is disabled.
(When you install a PCI video card, usually the onboard video is NOT automatically disabled.)
The only exception I've seen to that is with some recent and fairly recent mboards is if the main chipset supports Hybrid video (onboard video AND video in a slot) , the onboard video is NOT disabled when you install a PCI-E card, and you mat get no video on the card in a PCI-E X16 slot until you change settingsin the bios Setup .
I looked on the web and on the NVidia web site, and this:
System Chipset NVIDIA® GeForce® 7100 and nForce® 630i
does not support Hybrid video (NVidia calls it Hybrid SLI).

"-set initial display to pci express
-save settings and shutdown the system
-remove power cord and install video card to pci-e x16 slot."

You may not be able to set that to PCI-E until after the card is installed, depending on the bios.
You must connect a PCI-E power connector from the PS to the card.

It's a good idea to check whether it's set to that, but when the onboard video is automatically disabled by installing a PCI-E X16 card, that may be set to PCI-E by default.
That setting does NOT have to be correct in order to get video in Windows - Windows will have video in any case, but if that's nor set to PCI-E Windows will not be able to use the full capabilities allowed for by the chipset and the specific video drivers loaded for it.

"-plug power cord and start the system then install v-card driver (the latest driver can be found from nvidia website) "

If you got a CD with the video card, install the drivers from that.
See Response 4 - you must install the software for the card the right way.



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