How to set computer-specific file permissions

Seagate Expansion portable external 500g...
February 5, 2011 at 17:49:40
Specs: Windows XP, 1.6Ghz/768mb
I have a portable hard drive that I use at home and at school. I would like one of the two main folders (the one for schoolwork) to be accessible everywhere, and the other one (with my personnal stuff) to only be accessible at home. Of course I leave taking ownership to everyone in case of exceptional situations. Is there a way to assign permissions to folders that are specific to a computer, and not just a user name or user type? I've tried manually typing the name of my computer-slash-the name of my account, but when I plug my hard drive at school, it just changes the name of my computer to the name of the computer I'm using in the permissions.

The disk format is NTFS and I use Windows XP in both places.


See More: How to set computer-specific file permissions

Report •

#1
February 5, 2011 at 17:53:40
NTFS file permissions stink like that. You'd have to use some program like truecrypt or other.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


Report •

#2
February 5, 2011 at 22:11:03
Isn't there any other way? We're talking about 50gb of data here. I'd rather avoid having to encrypt that. Even if there was just a way to password-protect it without encryption. I don't want to protect it from hackers, just from people who pass by my workstation or from whoever would find my disc if it was lost, so it doesn't need to be nerd-proof protection.

Report •

#3
February 6, 2011 at 02:34:41
Use FOLDER GUARD.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 6, 2011 at 04:40:56

Report •

#5
February 6, 2011 at 05:25:53
Have you tried making your user on your home computer a member of a special group (say "Homeonly") and then granting permissions only to members of that group. As your user on your school computer won't be a member of that group it may just work.

I have to disagree with jefro. NTFS permissions are amongst the most versatile and fine-grained that I have ever come across; they provide an incredibly fine level of control over access to objects.


Report •

#6
February 6, 2011 at 12:38:14
I meant the stink like that in respect to how a moved filesystem doesn't retain the original permissions as one might expect.

I can access any NTFS folder that has not been encrypted on anyone's disk.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


Report •

#7
February 14, 2011 at 15:10:44
ijack your solution worked wonders. Thanks to everyone who replied.

Report •

Ask Question