Solved How to remove HDD from an All-in-one

November 21, 2016 at 00:04:24
Specs: None
Hi.

I want to remove the HDD from this machine to install it on another one and install an OS on it.
Would someone please help me to do this? first; i'm not even sure where the HDD is; the one in the front looks like it but there are way to many cables attached to it; some are inside and I couldn't photograph them;
http://uploads.im/RD3px.jpg


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✔ Best Answer
November 23, 2016 at 06:03:37
Hi Austin,

the danger here is that you could end up with a Door Stop.

Quite possibly on the HDD are special programs and/or drivers that are used by this device. If they are lost, it may not work correctly. Thus at least 2 backup copies of the HDD should be taken.

Alternatively can another HDD be used, for moving to a different os?

Which os were you thinking of trying?.

Good Luck - Keep us posted.



#1
November 21, 2016 at 02:45:10
You could look up the disassembly of your model on YouTube if it is there. What is the model of your all-in-one?

I don't need to be right, but I am never wrong.


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#2
November 21, 2016 at 03:08:10
Thank you.
I don't think there would be one.
It's old and uncommon; "Intel Dot.Station"
http://uploads.im/RD3px.jpg

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#3
November 21, 2016 at 04:26:32
I don't wish to appear rude, but if you can't recognize a hard disk do you think you are up to reviving this beast? (What you refer to looks like a PSU - the hard disk will have one power cable and one 40-pin ribbon cable.) And is it really worth the effort.

If you are determined, Google reveals a number of sites that claim to offer a service manual for this device. I looked but, as they are .exe files and I am naturally suspicious, I didn't download them.


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#4
November 21, 2016 at 07:33:28
I'm not a computer expert like you of course, but I 'can' recognize a hard disk; though in this specific machine; it was suspicious; that's why I asked here; because I was afraid I might remove something by mistake and cause irreversible damage.
I know there are 2 cables going to a HDD and that's why this looked suspicious; because it has more than 2.

So if it's a PSU or whatever else; then the hard must be somewhere further in; and that just makes it harder to find now! because as I said I'm not a pro and I'm afraid if I dig in myself; I might damage it. I assumed the hard would be right in the front lines, but it seems it's deeper inside.

message edited by AustinMelvin


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#5
November 21, 2016 at 08:24:05
As I said, I don't wish to be thought rude. But can I just add one word of warning.

Be very careful when poking around inside this device. I believe it contains a CRT display; these work on very high voltages, which can be present for quite a while after the machine has been switched off. Careless poking with a screwdriver could result in a painful, or even fatal, electric shock. Be absolutely sure that you disconnect it from the power supply, and leave it for several hours before opening the case.

I'd recommend that you read this article: http://www.peachpit.com/articles/ar...


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#6
November 21, 2016 at 11:09:20
May we know why you want to remove the hard drive?

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#7
November 21, 2016 at 11:30:47
to install it on another one and install an OS on it.
lol mentioned in first question
Davidw

message edited by Davidw


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#8
November 21, 2016 at 12:47:24
erm yes... Guess doesn't pay to reply on the fly...

How large a capacity is the drive; and what type - make/model (any indication?)


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#9
November 21, 2016 at 13:28:22
I posted a youtube video in your other thread. There are others as well. All you have to do is find where the 40-pin IDE ribbon cable attaches to motherboard & then follow it to the HDD. It's not a tiny laptop HDD, it's standard 3.5". Here's a pic of the system disassembled, see #4:

http://www.xente.mundo-r.com/jano/x...

Here's a fuzzy shot of the motherboard from the youtube video. Beneath it is the daughter card that connects to the white slot.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/GpHH7bejBlw/...

"How large a capacity is the drive"

From what I could find, it's probably 4.3GB. Here's his other thread:

http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

message edited by riider


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#10
November 21, 2016 at 15:19:00
Wow! how did you find that link! Thank you. I used google translate and figured some things more or less; It says even if you change the OS on another machine; it's not gonna work until you flash the BIOS and apparently some other things... .

So this is getting harder and harder!
and by the looks of that photo of disassembly; the HDD must be so deep inside that they had to literally throw everything out to reach it!!

message edited by AustinMelvin


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#11
November 23, 2016 at 06:03:37
✔ Best Answer
Hi Austin,

the danger here is that you could end up with a Door Stop.

Quite possibly on the HDD are special programs and/or drivers that are used by this device. If they are lost, it may not work correctly. Thus at least 2 backup copies of the HDD should be taken.

Alternatively can another HDD be used, for moving to a different os?

Which os were you thinking of trying?.

Good Luck - Keep us posted.


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#12
November 23, 2016 at 10:58:43
Thanks.

At first I was thinking Damn Small Linux and DOS; but then I figured Win98 would be far better because of its general compatibility since I'm not planning to perfom heavy tasks on it anyways.

Anyway I wanna thank everyone here for helping out; Thank you very much.


I thought this would be an easy and fast thing to do really; but turns out it's not; there are too many complications and risks. so I'm planning to maybe do a whole upgrading of the hardware, done by someone professional of course, to make the machine usable.
A whole new motherboard -probably plus a CPU and a formatted HDD- I assume would solve the BIOS problem and thus release it from its imposed limitations by the manufacturer. though as Mike says, there are probably necessary drivers and programs to make an all-in-one machine run; so I have to consult and entrust the job to someone professional; slowly and without haste.

message edited by AustinMelvin


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#13
November 24, 2016 at 01:21:22
"A whole new motherboard -probably plus a CPU and a formatted HDD- I assume would solve the BIOS problem and thus release it from its imposed limitations..."

Not trying to be a naysayer, but AIO machines are very difficult to upgrade, especially when it comes to motherboards. Finding one that's acceptable on size and compatibility with the other existing hardware may make it near impossible. Others have apparently gotten the machine to run XP and even Win7 (see riider's post #9 on your other thread) with the existing hardware. Personally, I'd attempt that before spending a great deal of time (and possibly money) in trying to shoehorn newer hardware into that system.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#14
November 24, 2016 at 03:13:32
I agree. I won't try anything before consulting and making sure that it will work.

Those Windows running machines you see are either sold that way -by a third party distributor- or modified by the users by the difficult processes discussed in this and my other 2 threads. But mostly; they are sold like that; running a Windows and BIOS lock-free; Mine unfortunately is not one of those.

And that Win7 you see; is not really a Win7; It's a wallpaper of the Win7 logo an a WinXP or 98... .
These machines can hardly run a WinXP; let alone Win7.

message edited by AustinMelvin


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