How to push in floppy disk to its normal position on laptop

June 25, 2014 at 02:20:46
Specs: Windows XP
Can you please tell me how to push in the pin of the floppy disk which seems to be stuck out and will not go in although several attempts. regards.

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#1
June 25, 2014 at 02:37:07
Are you certain there isn't a disc in there already? There is an eject button on the face of the drive (usually) - perhaps check with that.

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#2
June 25, 2014 at 03:59:26
Very kind of you for your advice, however I assure you that there is no disk in it.
The pin has been out for a long time, it seems that the internal mechanism of my laptop is faulty. I had opened the back of the laptop but there was nothing I could do to solve the issue. Thank you very much and kind regards.

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#3
June 25, 2014 at 04:50:42
ah... a laptop installation...

Likely you are into a replacement module (if you can find one for the model laptop concerned which make/model is it); or are into using a usb external module?

Have you managed to actually remove the module and see if you can reset that pin mechanism?

And thank you for a very polite response too!


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#4
June 25, 2014 at 14:41:22
What 'pin' are you talking about? There's no pin on the disk itself. There's just the metal cover over the data area that slides to the side when the disk is inserted.

Do you mean the eject button? If it's not working then either there's a problem with the disk--maybe it's not in all the way--or a hardware problem with the drive. Have you tried different disks? Sometimes kids will shove junk into floppy drives that prevent them from working.

And this is a 3.5" floppy disk and not some other type of media, right?


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#5
June 25, 2014 at 14:51:54
I seem to recall there is a "wee something" that detects whether or not a floppy is write-protected; as there is a wee slide that can cover a (square) hole in the corner of a floppy disk casing, and thus prevent "something" from passing through that hole; thus write protecting it.

Possibly it's that "something" that has not retracted properly and thus prevents the floppy from going in properly?


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#6
June 25, 2014 at 15:01:05
Yeah there's a write-protect tab in one corner of the disk. If the tab is moved to expose the hole a sensor in the drive detects that and prevents the disk being written to. But unless the disk is really damaged that tab won't prevent the disk from being inserted as it's flush with the disk surface.

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#7
June 25, 2014 at 15:55:22
I understand that aspect re' the slide... What I've not been aware of if that "sensor" in a floppy drive is mechanical or optical.. I'm presuming it's mechanical - as was with cassette tape decks/mechanism in days of yore... It was very small "probe" and it scarcely moved... If the cassette record tab was missing the "probe" inserted into the wee void and prevented recording. But if the tab was present then the probe couldn't move much if at all - and thus enabled the record side to operate (via a wee micro-switch mechanism...). I've known those fail and render it not possible to record on a cassette (when the cassette is enabled to be recorded on). But not known them actually "stick out" as it were when no cassette installed.

This situation does sound a little like a mechanical blockage and that "sensor probe" might be the problem... But how to clear it.. I've not gone inside a floppy drive mechanism - fortunately not had need to... But presumably they may be a way?


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#8
June 25, 2014 at 18:39:33
I guess you could call the sensor a 'pin' but it's not activated til the disk is in. When you push a disk in, the top bracket of the drive drops and locks the disk in That's when the sensor is in the position to detect if the hole is there or the tab is covering it. There's actually a sensor on each side of the drive. The one on the other side is to determine if the disk is a 720 K or 1.44. In the old days that was a quick way to determine if the drive was a 720 or 1.44 as only 1.44 had the second sensor--to a 720 drive all disks were the same. I'd just peek into the front of the drive and see how many sensors it had.

Because of space limitations laptop drives can be structured differently but they still have to have the sensors.

If that is the 'pin' that is causing the problem then there's a problem with the drive. It thinks there's a disk in, either because some foreign object has been pushed in or one of the springs has broken causing the bracket to drop as if there's a disk in it.


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#9
June 26, 2014 at 01:22:26
Yes I recall the two "holes" in the 1.44Meg floppies.

I think the possibility of something having been introduced into slot is valid; notwithstanding the cover/flap that they also had on some/all units?

Looking at the drive on my tres elderly Dell Dimension xps (circa 1998 model) I note the spring loaded cover in the disk insertion slot. Perhaps that is what is stuck, and it may be possible to free that "simple" mechanism - if not disable it, or remove the "flap" completely (not my preferred option).


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#10
June 26, 2014 at 11:33:19
It'd help if coquill posted back with more details.

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#11
June 28, 2014 at 07:44:00
I'm thinking they mean the eject button.

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#12
June 28, 2014 at 08:08:29
(I'm surmising this).

The eject button does just that - providing all is working OK. It triggers the release/withdrawl of the "pin" or whatever that goes through (or not) the slot in the disk case's corner; and likely releases the catch holds the the disk in place, which then is" spring" ejected

It has no (ought not to have) any effect on inserting a disk; unless it is someway also faulty?


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