how to format a degaussed hard drive

November 2, 2010 at 09:02:17
Specs: Windows XP
Many years ago when audio tape recording first became popular, erasing an audio tape without re-recording on it required that you run it through your tape recorder in the record mode without connecting a microphone. This was very time consuming so they came out with what they called bulk erasers or degaussers. However, a lot of them produced a very weak magnetic field and did a poor job of erasing the material on the tape. At that time I read an article in a magazine devoted to audio tape recording that showed how to construct a bulk tape eraser out of a discarded power transformer from an old television set. I constructed such a unit and still use it to this very day. As a matter of fact I used it recently to erase a computer hard drive from an old computer of mine. It seemed like a good idea at the time, but I didn't give any thought to what comes next. I have no idea how to recover the drive for reuse. How do you recover a drive that has been wiped completely clean?

Thank you for any advice and assistance you may be able to provide.

Christopher R. Mohr Sr.


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#1
November 2, 2010 at 09:41:36
I don't think you can.
Modern hard drives are low level formatted by the manufacturer. If this information has been lost there is no way it can be replaced with software.

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#2
November 2, 2010 at 11:19:15
Yes, I'm afraid you have blown it. Only the manufacture can put back what you have erased.

Stuart


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#3
November 2, 2010 at 11:22:45
Is the hard drive recognised in BIOS ?

If yes try GPARTED: http://gparted.sourceforge.net/


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Related Solutions

#4
November 2, 2010 at 12:48:05
If you didn't wipe out any drive chips you need a low level format.

I guy I knew did that but found out it erased the drive's memory. You need a small amount of space on the chips to tell the computer what the drive is.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


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#5
November 2, 2010 at 12:49:05
If this was a scsi then the id part may have been on the actual disk and not chips.

By the way, don't try this again.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


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#6
November 2, 2010 at 14:24:25
Wiping and degaussing are two different things. If it's truly been degaussed then it's ruined.

If FDISK or other partitioning software sees it then you may be able to get it going. Try to partition it using that software first. If not, an LLF as already mentioned may help. Post back the drive model.

Don't be an idiot. Vote Republican


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#7
November 2, 2010 at 17:33:23
I know you can recover it since I have seen this done many times. This isn't the first guy that ever tried this.


If the chips report to bios then it may be possible to recovery it by using a low level format.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


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#8
November 2, 2010 at 19:00:08
Maybe this helps:
http://hddguru.com/software/2006.04...

The original poster should always write the last response !!!
Let us know, if the problem is solved !!!


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#9
April 24, 2011 at 06:44:17
The user cannot low level format a modern hard disk drive. That has been the case ever since ATA drives where invented. A true low level format is performed by the manufacturer and is dependent many things that the user has no control over. Among other things a true low level format determines how many tracks on the disk, how many sectors per-track, sector interleave, the number of heads, the number of platters and the number of cylinders.. Not things the user has any control over.

These software utilities that claim to do a low level format simply write zeros to the data area of the disk. It does not touch the area where the low level format information put there by the manufacture resides. To use there utilities the drive first has to be recognised in the BIOS and in order for it to do that it needs the low level format information. Degaussing may well have destroyed this information.

There is software that will also destroy this information but that is designed as a security measure to render a disk that may contain sensitive information unusable before it is disposed of.

Stuart


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