how to copy audio files from cd to desktop

July 3, 2020 at 08:45:34
Specs: Windows 10
I need to copy audio files from a CD to my desktop and then share the files. I would be using WETRANSFER program for sharing

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#1
July 3, 2020 at 08:59:24
That sounds old school haha. I haven't copied a cd to desktop for a long time but if I recall correctly I used to just use Windows Media Player. There is an option to 'Rip CD' and as far as I remember it's as simple as just choosing this option and the cd should copy to file. You could also try googling programs that 'rip' audio files from cd to file. Hope this helped

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#2
July 3, 2020 at 09:27:53
The songs on your disc will be in .CDA format. For sharing, you'll want to convert them to .MP3. There are plenty of different programs you can use to rip the files from your CDs. As mentioned above, Windows Media Player is one of them.
https://www.dummies.com/computers/o...
https://www.lifewire.com/copy-music...

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#3
July 3, 2020 at 11:57:34
Can't the CDA files be converted to say (Microsoft's) WAV or (Apple's) AAIF format; and then shared (sent) as that?

CD quality isn't as good as say LP (analogue)... and mp3 is really way down in terms of quality...

message edited by trvlr


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Related Solutions

#4
July 4, 2020 at 00:34:12
There is no difference in copying photos, MP3s or video files from a CD or DVD to any other type of storage to a hard drive - although depending on the age of your optical drive, it can be a bit slow.

Start by opening an Explorer window on the Windows desktop and browsing to the Documents folder. Select the document on the left side of the window, then on the right, right-click an empty area and select New> Folder. Type a name for the folder and press the return key.

create a new folder

Insert the disk you want to copy from the files and, after Windows opens a new Explorer window for it, simply drag the files from its window to one of the windows with the folder you created on your hard drive.


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#5
July 5, 2020 at 18:16:10
If it's a 'store bought' music cd then as already mentioned, you need to 'rip' the song from the cd and it'll save as .mp3 or .wav. If it's a home-made burned cd I think the songs on it will show as regular files and you can copy them as you would any other files. As I understand it, cda files aren't actual music files but small index/text files to show where the songs are. That's why if you just copy the cda files you end up with nothing worthwhile.

If you burn them back on to a cd it needs to be recorded as a 'music'--not 'data'--cd else the songs won't play continuously. If you keep them on your hard drive to play or share then nothing more needs to be done to them.

There's lots of free ripping software if you're uncomfortable with the bulky and confusing (in my opinion) WMP or other windows-supplied tools.


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#6
July 13, 2020 at 01:55:32
The essence of an audio CD is that all you see in My Computer or Windows Explorer are a few (very) small files like track01.cda, track02.cda and so on. But you don't see the music files, so you can't copy them. To get music from an audio CD on your hard disk you have to "rip" it using your favorite "ripping program".

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#7
July 13, 2020 at 03:19:19
I've just done a test... on a Mac system (running OS X Catalina)

I copied an audio track from a commercial CD - one the tracks from the 2Cellos "Score" CD. I used track 14. The CD shows the tracks all to be AAIF format.

Simply copied that track to the desktop for this test.

Double clicked on it and it plays perfectly through iTunes; and also plays perfectly in VLC...

The copy shows as still being AAIF.

I recall I used to copy a lot CD to my windows systems in the past; and did it exactly the same way. I don't ever recall having to rip an audio CD.... To copy it one can use an iTunes routine, or other similar apps.; and also of course one of many free or paid for copying apps.


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#8
July 13, 2020 at 07:02:56
Audio CD's do not have files, the audio is one long data stream. Well ok, I guess you could call it one big file. The files you see in Explorer and I believe it's called Finder on Macs is not the audio file, it is a bookmark to the location of the song in the data stream on the disc. That is why they show up as small 1k file sizes. The data stream itself is a pulse code modulation format or pcm for short.

Your Mac has a built in ripping program that converts it to the AAIF format when you copy it to your computer. An AAIF file is a pcm file with header information such as bitrate and sample rate. The data stream on the disc doesn't have a header because an audio CD is always going to be 16 bit 44.1kHz sample rate. CD players and computers know this is a constant so no need to add that info to the data stream.

If you try to copy the file you see in Windows Explorer to your hard drive then play the file on your hard drive, it will play as long as the CD is still in the drive. If you remove the CD and try to play the file on the hard drive, it won't work. That is why you need a ripping program.

You can rip it as a wave file which is Windows equivalent to Apple's AAIF files. It's an uncompressed pcm file with a header. These files are rather large though so you can also rip them in a compressed format such as mp3 which will be a much smaller file size. You will lose quality though in an mp3, there is a trade off between audio quality and file size.

message edited by THX 1138


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#9
July 13, 2020 at 07:33:28
Ach-zo.. To get it clear in my head... there is more than just the AAIF file I copied to my Mac desktop? When I "play" that file there is actually other data "somewhere" on my Mac drive and that 's what is actually playing - when I use iTunes/VLC etc.? In the case of iTunes it starts automatically when I double click on it; but with VLC I drag the AAIF file into VLC and then "play" it.

Where might this data be located?


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#10
July 13, 2020 at 07:55:47
No extra files, your Mac is smart. When you copy the "track 1.cda, track 2.cda, etc" files to your hard drive, your Mac knows you want to really copy the song information data so it reads the information in the cda file for the location of the data on the disc, then copies that part of the disc over to your hard drive and creates the header information that tells your Mac what the file is. What you end up with is the AAIF file.

Windows isn't as smart, it will just copy the cda file over to your hard drive, not the actual audio. That's why you need a third party ripping program if you are using Windows. You might be able to do it in Media Player but I despise that program so I never use it.

message edited by THX 1138


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#11
July 13, 2020 at 12:47:38
re’#10

I follow that ok, but what happens when one simply views the contents of the CD and shows the files a AAIF.


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#12
July 14, 2020 at 08:42:53
I'm not sure why Macs do that, probably just how they choose to display the information.

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#13
July 14, 2020 at 09:14:35
I wonder if they (behind the scenes as it were) emulate a copy to the drive operation and thus show the file(s) as AAIF?

Meanwhile - many thanks for the edukational experience; I dun learned sumat I never gnu before. So the day has been a success!.


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#14
July 14, 2020 at 15:01:20
It could be, I'm just not that familliar with the Mac world.

You're most welcome.


message edited by THX 1138


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