How to convert RAW HDD into NTFS format

April 13, 2012 at 13:39:08
Specs: Windows 7
I have a terabyte HDD that is currently in RAW format because I dropped it whilst it was plugged into my laptop. I'm trying to convert it into NTFS format but have not been able to so far.

First and foremost, I do not care about losing the data on it. It was mostly pictures that I have backed up elsewhere. I would just like it to function again.

I tried formatting it when Windows prompted me to but it said that it could not complete the format; from other posts I assume it's because of the RAW format.

I'm a total beginner when it comes to these sort of things so may be unfamiliar with some terminology you use. Any help would be very much appreciated.


See More: How to convert RAW HDD into NTFS format

Report •


#1
April 13, 2012 at 13:59:30
It may have suffered physical damage when it was dropped.
You should obtain a drive diagnostic tool from the manufacturer and scan the drive to see whether it can be recovered.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


Report •

#2
April 13, 2012 at 14:05:52
No visible physical damage. Ran it through a few programs including chkdsk and it simply said it was in RAW format.

*EDIT* I've also partially ran it through EaseUS and have been able to recover files from it, so I'm assuming I am able to convert it somehow?


Report •

#3
April 13, 2012 at 14:23:10
The possible physical damage is not to the external enclosure but rather to the platters inside when the read/write head impacted the disk surface. There is no way to check visibly for this kind of damage without dismantling it and checking with an electron microscope. Get hold of a drive diagnostic tool downloadable from the maker and run a full test.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
April 13, 2012 at 16:21:00
"The possible physical damage is not to the external enclosure but rather to the platters inside when the read/write head impacted the disk surface."

Agreed. The fact that it is in RAW format and that Windows can't format it indicates that it's probably suffered a head-crash (which is usually terminal for almost all hard-drives). If you can read some files, it doesn't necessarily mean that you should trust the drive, even if you were able to format it.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Report •

#5
April 13, 2012 at 17:23:10
I'd test it with the OEM diags or get some generic hard drive diags first.

Text, talk, drive...CRASH.

Hang up and drive @#$%^^


Report •


Ask Question