Solved How long a failing onboard GPU can last before it dies?

November 6, 2017 at 23:50:12
Specs: Windows 10 Pro, 6 GB
So yesterday I sent my laptop to a computer technician, and he fixed the "black screen" problem I had with the laptop. I asked him what was the problem, and he said it's the graphics processor (onboard GPU).

He also said that I did not (or may have forgotten) to turn on the fan in the laptop. (You know, I cleaned the laptop while I was trying to diagnose and to fixing the problem by myself.)

The problem started during the second or third week of September this year. My laptop was idle (but not in sleep mode — yet) when suddenly the screen turned completely black without prior warnings. The system didn't shut down — only the screen turned black.

At first, I thought the LCD was damaged; but later, I suspected the HDD was physically damaged from the inside. And later, I thought there's probably something on the mobo that no longer functioning (properly).

Therefore, I sent it to that technician. And although he managed to solve the problem, he did mention that the graphics GPU is probably dying and may not be able to last until the end of 2017.

Do you think he's right? Or rather, is there anything I can do to extend the GPU's life?


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#1
November 7, 2017 at 02:31:30
Do you think he's right? Or rather, is there anything I can do to extend the GPU's life?

if hes right, lowering temp may elongate your igpu's life, in other words use some software to set a higher fan curve

i5-6600K@4.6GHz/4.2GHz cache@1.305v | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133@ 14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.34v | ASUS Z170-K | Samsung 250GB SSD 850 EVO | MSI Radeon RX 570 ARMOR 4GB@1268cc&2000mem | Corsair CX450 450W


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#2
November 7, 2017 at 05:43:36
If you're asking about an Asus K43U laptop, the GPU is integrated into the APU, it's not a separate card or part of the motherboard. According to the Asus specs, the APU is either an AMD E-350 with Radeon HD 6310, or an AMD C-50 with Radeon HD HD 6250.

https://www.asus.com/Laptops/K43U/s...

What exactly did the "computer technician" do? The black screen issue is somewhat common with certain Asus laptops. There are plenty of different fixes available: http://bfy.tw/EtaV

Hopefully you didn't pay much for the repair.


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#3
November 7, 2017 at 15:29:48
✔ Best Answer
I wonder what evidence he had for the GPU dying. It sounds rather unusual. If there is anything wrong with it there ought to be some symptoms.

Makes me wonder what, if anything, he found and whether it just started working again so he happened to think the GPU might be the problem.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
November 7, 2017 at 18:19:31
It seemed like he didn't want me to know the exact steps he did. All he said is something like "it's the graphics" and that the integrated graphics processor is probably dying or failing.

But he actually charged me quite affordable — around 6 bucks only.

So I think he simply turned on the laptop fan? Or fixed the connection of some stuff on the mobo.. Because the fan now seems better than it was. 😁


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#5
November 7, 2017 at 18:32:33
I did suspect something wrong with the graphics, long before the black screen problem occurred. You know, sometimes the screen goes really dark (but not black) while on battery mode, esp. on (very) low battery level.

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#6
November 7, 2017 at 18:43:41
I think your symptoms on a poor battery are to be expected. My best guess is that your graphics chip is not about to fail.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#7
November 7, 2017 at 19:13:53
Thanks Derek.

I actually also refused to believe that the graphics processor is dying, despite I did feel something's not right with the graphics.

I should also add that I had not been able to use the laptop since the screen turned black in Sept. I also couldn't tell whether the BIOS was still accessible during that period. And I had no idea whether the system could boot into Windows. Because the screen was black — I saw nothing but my face.. Well its shadow. 😀

Also, the guy who repaired my laptop, I believed it when he said: I tried to login, but had no luck. because all user accounts are password-protected. Well I mean, he had not accessed Windows; therefore he probably just did something with the fan and whatever else on the mobo.


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#8
November 8, 2017 at 05:23:04
"sometimes the screen goes really dark (but not black) while on battery mode, esp. on (very) low battery level"

That's what it's supposed to do. The system is trying to conserve power. Do you know which keys to press to brighten the screen (& suck up the battery power)? I think it's Fn + F5.

I found this: https://www.asus.com/us/support/FAQ...

message edited by riider


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#9
November 8, 2017 at 06:56:00
Thanks riider.

The system is trying to conserve power.
Yes, I understand that. But sometimes, I just feel unease when the screen goes really dark..

Do you know which keys to press to brighten the screen (& suck up the battery power)?
I know it now. 😀


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#10
November 8, 2017 at 07:10:53
Thanks also to you hidde663. I'd certainly keep the higher fan curve thing in mind.

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#11
January 20, 2018 at 13:06:23
Hey guys,

The exact same problem happened again: (on Jan 18th or the 17th/19th in your local time zone...)
● I think my laptop went critically/very low on power. (Which while I was asleep)
● So later (if not immediately) the laptop shut down.
● The next morning, I plugged in the power adapter, and turned on the laptop.
● Like always, the laptop did turn on; except this time, once again, I saw nothing on the screen — no AMD splash screen; no Windows splash screen.

Secondly, I think what he did (i.e. the guy/technician whom repaired my laptop last year and yesterday — Jan 20th) is, he reflowed the graphics chipset on my laptop's motherboard. (Using a heat gun, maybe?)
https://www.deskdecode.com/how-to-fix-a-laptop-gpu-by-reflow-graphic-chip/

Because he still said, "it's the graphic chip". Except this time, he also said a few things that made me thought again about "reflow graphic chip", which I found out via a forum thread that I've forgotten its URL address.

And last but not least, what do you suggest me to do, in addition to using a cooler, in order to prevent the problem from happening again?

Many thanks!

message edited by Sheherazade


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#12
January 20, 2018 at 13:27:10
Firstly, going back to your original question, you said:
"My laptop was idle (but not in sleep mode — yet) when suddenly the screen turned completely black without prior warnings. The system didn't shut down — only the screen turned black."
Depending on your settings if the computer is not being used the screen will shut off first, the computer later. So that sounds pretty normal.

Back to now. I wonder if it is possible that as the battery had run right down, when you plugged in the adapter it was taking a lot of juice charging the battery leaving insufficient to properly run the machine and its display.

If I'm right, apart from trying to avoid the situation then maybe the battery is getting a bit tired. Some of the symptoms don't sound like a fault at all. If you have some suspicions about temperature than you need to check the figures. Run HWinfo32 after the computer has been on a few hours:
https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php
Let us have the CPU temperatures.
[I'm assuming the motherboard has sensors, otherwise it will show nothing]

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#13
January 20, 2018 at 14:02:24
when you plugged in the adapter it was taking a lot of juice charging the battery leaving insufficient to properly run the machine and its display

Did you mean, the battery was over-charged?

Run HWinfo32 after the computer has been on a few hours:
https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php
Let us have the CPU temperatures.

Alright, I'll do that.


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#14
January 20, 2018 at 14:09:27
But actually, my laptop has been "in use" since I brought it back home yesterday afternoon.. The laptop hasn't sleep because I'm just worried that it won't wake up normally. Or that the screen won't wake up.. 😀

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#15
January 20, 2018 at 15:23:14
Did you mean, the battery was over-charged?
No, I meant it might be nearing the end of its life requiring a higher than usual charge. Without more definite evidence though replacing it would not be justified.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
January 20, 2018 at 20:11:27
If there is a problem with the sleep mode, disable it and change the low battery status action to "shutdown" the PC.
How long do you run on a battery only use? If less than 30 mins, the battery is degraded and should be changed. Keep on charging degraded batteries can be dangerous as internal shorts will overheat the battery.

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#17
January 21, 2018 at 05:56:03
The battery can actually still hold charge for up to 2.5 hours:
https://imgur.com/8QrH0Ig

HWiNFO32 Sensor Status: (taken while the battery was charging)
https://imgur.com/U7EUyLb


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#18
January 21, 2018 at 11:05:19
Do the temperatures show? If so let us have them. Thx,

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#19
January 21, 2018 at 20:31:05
See https://imgur.com/3UGMRxL, which was taken just now.

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#20
January 22, 2018 at 05:54:21
They seem fairly high. The normal reason is that the vents and in particular the CPU heat-sink need cleaning out, although one might have thought the technician would have done that.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#21
January 22, 2018 at 08:24:23
Thanks Derek.

I doubt about the vents and CPU heat-sink being dirty (because last year, before I sent my laptop to the technician, I disassembled the laptop and cleaned pretty much everything that I could touch/reach and clean; and I'm quite sure the technician also performed a cleaning — both last year and on the January 19th); but I certainly will get a cooling fan/pad for my laptop.


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#22
January 22, 2018 at 11:12:13
Has the CPU ever been replaced because not adhering to its own laid down thermal paste procedure is another common cause of high temperatures?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#23
January 24, 2018 at 09:43:04
No, the CPU has never been replaced.

I really have no idea what causes the high temperature. Even at this moment, the temperature is 65°.

Any other ideas? Could it be the battery or whatever controls the battery? (I mean, internally on/in the motherboard)

Or due to aging? (The laptop is now 6 y/o..) 😁


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#24
January 24, 2018 at 10:03:36
I can only think of three reasons for overheating. The first two, already given, are dust and thermal fixing of the CPU. This only leaves some sort of fan issue, such as the bearings being sticky and it not running at full speed.

It is unusual but the CPU heat sink might need re-seating if it wasn't done very well in the first place.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#25
January 24, 2018 at 10:34:03
Well, I can check if it was properly seated or not. But it's just troublesome to disassemble the laptop.. And I'm worried that I may make things worse. (Remember last year, the technician told me that the fan was not "turned on"?)

So for the time being, I'm just gonna pray that the temperature will not get any higher than that. 😁

Thanks again for your help!


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#26
January 24, 2018 at 12:41:12
I suppose it is just possible that if there has been overheating in the past this might have damaged the thermal seating which can only be fixed by re-doing it.

Good luck

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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