Solved How important is a DVD player on a laptop...

Microsoft / Windows 7 enterprise sp1(...
October 14, 2020 at 08:09:11
Specs: Windows 7, 4096 D MMb
How important still is the DVD or optical drives in this day and age. I need to replace a stolen laptop but notice that most macines nowadays come without an optical drive. I still have a lot of software on a disk. Any ideas please.

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✔ Best Answer
October 14, 2020 at 20:19:29
CD drives have given way to memory sticks with much higher capacity.
Reliability of both media depends on how you use and treat it.
CD-R/RW degrade over time because of the (chemical) media layer. If you record at high speed, data may corrupt faster (my professional experience).
USB sticks can break down or loose data, but personally only had one stick broken over the many years of using a number of USB sticks.

If you have some IMPORTANT DATA, use multiple media and backup copies!!

Personally I use a variety of systems as backup; NAS and offline harddrives for important data.
Other temporary/sharing data using online-storage MS Onedrive. Can sync with mobile devices. Or USB sticks.
The external CD drive is just there in case....

message edited by sluc



#1
October 14, 2020 at 09:29:11
Optical drives are becoming outdated. If you feel you need a "built-in" one, your laptop choices will be limited. Otherwise, you can buy an external USB CD/DVD burner.

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#2
October 14, 2020 at 13:54:44
"laptops" are more like tablets these days; as many now have touch screen functionality and the display can be moved to resemble a tablet. And they're much thinner than previous.

Thus no room for rj45 ports and no DVD either. All in the name of progress and cost cutting...

rj45 ports can be added using a usb adapter, or a usb hub with an rj45 port included. External DVD units of course are all usb based anyway, so no problem attaching one when required.

Personally I feel the DVD 's reported demise is a little premature; a bit like mark Twain's alleged death? They'll be around for a lot longer yet; much as vinly is, and even making a recovery/re-appearance too

https://writingexplained.org/idiom-...

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#3
October 14, 2020 at 15:05:52
I agree with trvlr, The entire concept of a laptop is portability. Once you start adding external drives you defeat the original concept. DVDr will be useful for some time yet. IMO the manufacturers are scaling down for cost reasons. I have loads of software that came on CD or DVD that I may want to install sometime in the future. I hate laptop keyboards so I will not be migrating to them any time soon. My copy of Windows 10 came on DVD.

When building a new desktop I will attempt to use a full featured MBoard. I may not need every feature but if a model sells well the manufacturers will continue to provide those features. Most chip sets ate capable of many more features than the manufacturer includes for cost reasons.


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Related Solutions

#4
October 14, 2020 at 18:39:36
Virtually every laptop comes with USB ports (and few with a DVD drive) now. 4.7GB (and even 22.5GB for Blue-ray) just isn't very much space for storing data anymore (though I'd consider optical storage still more reliable than flash drives)

If someone were in need of a DVD drive, there's plenty of USB DVD drives still available:

https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?d=Usb+d...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#5
October 14, 2020 at 20:19:29
✔ Best Answer
CD drives have given way to memory sticks with much higher capacity.
Reliability of both media depends on how you use and treat it.
CD-R/RW degrade over time because of the (chemical) media layer. If you record at high speed, data may corrupt faster (my professional experience).
USB sticks can break down or loose data, but personally only had one stick broken over the many years of using a number of USB sticks.

If you have some IMPORTANT DATA, use multiple media and backup copies!!

Personally I use a variety of systems as backup; NAS and offline harddrives for important data.
Other temporary/sharing data using online-storage MS Onedrive. Can sync with mobile devices. Or USB sticks.
The external CD drive is just there in case....

message edited by sluc


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#6
October 15, 2020 at 00:48:49
If you have some IMPORTANT DATA, use multiple media and backup copies!!

Agree fully with that approach, Sadly so many seem to rely on just one type of storage media’s, and many on flash drives especially.

Optical media is allegedly more reliable (better long term life) than in the early days; and there is the M-disk which has a greater capacity than DVD+DL, but it’s not widely used, or promoted.


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#7
October 15, 2020 at 01:44:45
Guys thanks you have provided me with a wealth of info. Questions: So Built in optical drive no necessity. Should I go for SSD or HDD? Poking your finger at a screen or keyboard? Minimum RAM? What new tech should I go for? For example usb 3 ports or is there newer technology? I'm not into mobility as we don't travel much so lastly should it really be a laptop or should I go for a standalone box with separate screen and keyboard.

When was the last time you did something for the first time?


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#8
October 15, 2020 at 01:50:12
A very important question. In my limited opinion I'm thinking Dell or HP. In Dell is it Lattitude or Experion. In HP I don't really know the different models. I'm not into gaming or other fancy stuff. Just looking at your middle of the range package with SSD, lots of RAM good quality graphics, etc.

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#9
October 15, 2020 at 02:01:38
If pennies allow... a desktop (tower or flat box) with spare internal slots, bay(s) for dvd drive(s), separate monitor, external keyboard, and a plug-in mouse. SSD is faster than mechanical HDD.

And then for occasional portable option... a “smart” phone, or a cheap tablet.

If you really feel a need for touch screen functionality on a monitor then be prepared to pay for it.

Or...

A laptop, external monitor and usb or plugin (my preference) keyboard, usb hub(s) with rj45 port included, external DVD unit(s). Laptops usually have 3 USB ports, so at least one usb hub will be more than essential... I also prefer external mouse - touch pads don’t do it for me.

Others here will have their, ideas, preferences of course, and it’s a matter of deciding which are most suited to you (and your bank account)?


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#10
October 15, 2020 at 02:06:44
I’ve been happy overall with Dell - towers and laptops; but I’ve also been OK with Acer (laptops).

They all come with bloatware... and there are routines to get rid of much of it. Some of the chaps here can advise more fully on that.

Nowadays I run Mac systems... (MacBook and Mac Mini, and an a iPad & iPhone).


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#11
October 15, 2020 at 02:32:56
Trvir when you say laptop with external monitor...do you mean a laptop WITHOUT it's own physically connected monitor? Or do you mean to attach a separate external monitor. Won't the built-in monitor be in the way? Pardon if I sound stupid as someone suggested.

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#12
October 15, 2020 at 04:47:29
External monitor attached to a typical laptop.

I’ve done that many times and it hasn’t been in the way.


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#13
October 16, 2020 at 06:18:22
Go to the Laptop/Notebook section at newegg.com. On the left side, check off on the things that you want to have - CPU type, screen size, amount of RAM, optical drive, manufacturer, etc. & then click Apply. You will then have a bunch of choices that fit your criteria. You can then sort them by price, popularity, best selling, etc. From there, you can narrow it down to the ones that interest you most & then search for reviews to see if there are any that should be avoided. That will narrow down your list even further. You don't necessarily have to buy from newegg, you can see if the laptop you decided on is available elsewhere - BestBuy, Amazon, etc. Wherever you feel most comfortable spending your money.

https://www.newegg.com/Laptops-Note...
http://www.notebookreview.com/
https://www.notebookcheck.net/

Personally, I would avoid a laptop with an internal battery, especially if you're the type of person that uses a laptop more like a desktop & constantly leaves it connected to the AC adapter. Overcharging can cause internal lithium-ion batteries to swell. I recently worked on an Asus laptop with an internal battery so swollen that it put pressure under the touchpad area making the left/right buttons unusable so a wireless mouse was needed.


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#14
October 17, 2020 at 09:42:12
Thanks guys. You're all winners. I really learnt a lot

When was the last time you did something for the first time?


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