How do I change my external hard drive from FAT32 to NTFS??

May 29, 2016 at 08:54:57
Specs: Windows NT based, SDDR 1GB
Hi there,

I have an external hard drive that is in the FAT32 format, and it wont allow me to transfer a file that is over 1GB.

Therefore, I desire to change it to NTFS. I searched on Google, and came across basic instructions on how to change it on command prompt. After numerous attempts, it still did not change the format to NTFS.

I do not want to have the risk of not having this 1GB file on the external hard drive.

I apologize if this is in the incorrect section.

PLease advise,

PC_Darkie


See More: How do I change my external hard drive from FAT32 to NTFS??

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#1
May 29, 2016 at 09:24:25
Yes, it is posted in the wrong section. Why would you choose CPU/overclocking? The moderator will most likely move it.

A FAT32 partition will accept a single file up to 4GB (minus 1 byte) in size. If you can't copy a 1GB file, my guess is you have a problem not related to formatting. To convert to NTFS, you will have to reformat the drive which means you will lose all the data that's currently on it, are you OK with that?

BTW, what is "Windows NT based, SDDR 1GB"?

message edited by riider


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#2
May 29, 2016 at 12:58:01
Any change of the file system risks any data on that drive. If there is something on the drive you wish to preserve, back it up to something before trying to attempt to convert. Also, riider is correct about FAT32 file sizes. Is the file larger than 4GB? If so, then you need to look at this:

http://www.howtogeek.com/226992/htg...

Also, never move files. Copy them first then delete from the source once you've verified they successfully copied. If something were to happen during the move, you'd lose it completely.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#3
May 29, 2016 at 13:26:44
Most definitely copy/duplicate anything important to external media - DVD at least; and if possible (another) hard drive. Verify the copies (DVD or whatever) are truly accessible before proceeding with the ntfs aspect...

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Related Solutions

#4
May 29, 2016 at 17:03:01
"external hard drive that is in the FAT32 format"
Leave the drive connected.

"I desire to change it to NTFS"
In Windows Explorer, right click on the drive, select Format.
File System: Make sure it is on NTFS.

Another way.

Convert Partition
http://www.extend-partition.com/hel...
This function will convert FAT partition to NTFS partition. To do this, you can improve the partition performance.

message edited by Johnw


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#5
May 29, 2016 at 18:28:25
No I have like 100GB of important data that I can not lose!!

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#6
May 29, 2016 at 18:53:40
"No I have like 100GB of important data that I can not lose!!"

Then you had better be backing it up on more than just a single drive.


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#7
May 31, 2016 at 08:39:34

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#8
May 31, 2016 at 15:38:28
I still don't think the FAT32 formatting is what's preventing a 1GB file from being copied to the ext HDD. But before even trying the NTFS converting software suggested above, the 100GB of data should be backed up 1st, just in case.

Got a couple dozen DVDs laying around? lol

message edited by riider


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#9
May 31, 2016 at 19:09:55
Re: #8
Yes it can. FAT32 is a boss of errors, it even sometimes shows "Out of space" when you have like, 30GB free? (was in my case)

message edited by jaysarma987


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#10
June 2, 2016 at 02:03:23
It is possible for you to convert FAT32 to NTFS without losing data.
http://www.disk-partition.com/resou...
But as riider said, FAT32 file system supports to transfer files up to 4 GB. If you failed to, it might be somewhere else wrong.
Did you get any error message when it failed?

message edited by Ingrid_C


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#11
June 2, 2016 at 02:38:56
It is possible for you to convert FAT32 to NTFS without losing data.

True... BUT it is seldom (never I suggest) wise to make changes to a system without first securing/safeguarding critical files; personal stuff and the like...


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#12
June 2, 2016 at 18:21:52
My apology.
It is true, and if you want to give it shot. I would also suggest you to backup these crucial files before hand in case something bad happens.

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#13
June 3, 2016 at 04:57:19
"Ingrid_C"

No need to apologise... You're info/suggestion was correct... The linked utility does claim it can be done - but doesn't seem to suggest that it might be wise to safeguard critical files at least. Sadly more than a few utilities like to claim 100% safe to use etc.; and then one or two (sometimes more...) cases appear where it clearly wasn't so.

Any operation which "might" threaten critical/personal files and their integrity it's wise to ensure they are safe elsewhere beforehand. Sadly not all do of course...


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