How can I stress test my pc?

Microsoft Windows 7 home premium
October 15, 2020 at 05:08:33
Specs: Windows 10, i7 9700K
So, I've tried passmark and prime95 but they seem to only stress one resource at a time. Where can I find a program that will put all my resources to 100% at the same time? Id like to test system stability.

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#1
October 15, 2020 at 06:48:55
I will suggest using the Prime95 torture and Valley benchmark test running together. It would help if you have both running since your GPU's temperature will raise your CPU's temp and vice versa. Most people recommend a Twenty-four hours test.

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#2
October 15, 2020 at 08:21:44

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#3
October 15, 2020 at 09:25:56
The "ultimate" stress test is whether or not it will survive and continue to work perfectly if dropped from a height of say 10-12 ft; or off the back of a speeding truck...

The latter is how Tetronix allegedly tested their broadcast/hi-tech industry standard oscilloscopes (single and dual-trace versions) way back in the '60-70s... I can confirm that if one was knocked over on it's custom designed mobile trolly - onto its side - it still worked perfectly afterwards; although one of the white ceramic mounting frames for (then discreet) components was cracked... And they were valve/tube systems in those days as well (obviously) as the crt display itself.

I seriously doubt any domestic (at least) kit would survive that well today; although likely a lot of military spec'd might...

message edited by trvlr


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#4
October 15, 2020 at 17:13:09
So, I ran OCCT. That maxed out my cpu continuously. It shows errors. Over about 20 minutes, I got 1573 Errors!!! What does this mean? My mobo and CPU are at stock clockrates. Not overclocked at all.

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#5
October 15, 2020 at 17:37:14

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#6
October 15, 2020 at 17:52:41
Only thing I really got out of that link was maybe it's a bug with the test and my CPU. But nothing really confirms that. Some reason I doubt that. I just ordered a water cooler for the CPU to see if I can get it to run cooler. Right now it's running in the 60s Celsius. I wouldn't think that's too hot... TJ max is 100.

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#7
October 15, 2020 at 17:54:30
Also, the app doesn't tell me what the error is in. Is it for sure in the CPU or is it in memory?

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#8
October 15, 2020 at 23:19:02
CPU at 60 on Idle?? I think you should check your cooling system!
Water cooling you say? Did you connect pump and sensors to the right MB headers?
Applied thermal compound correctly?

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#9
October 16, 2020 at 04:28:29
Normally is runs 30-40c idle. I don't remember what I was doing when I wrote that post. I might have been running a few vms.

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#10
October 16, 2020 at 04:51:15
So, I ran Intel's Extreme Tuning Utility's stress test all last night. My computer did not freeze over the night (like it did the night before when I wasn't running a stress test.) So, the CPU has been 100% for about11 hours. Currently the CPU is between 58-67C.

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#11
October 16, 2020 at 04:53:23
As soon as I stopped the stress test, within seconds it was down between 30-37 C (sometimes dipping into the high 20s)

message edited by dorlow


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#12
October 17, 2020 at 22:06:46
So, I just installed a water cooler. That was an interesting experience. Now my CPU at idle seems to hover mid 20s C.

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#13
October 17, 2020 at 22:30:38
So, I just ran prime95 stress test on it. There were a few times it hit in the 80s! That made me nervous a little bit. When I first installed the water cooler on the CPU, I saw it had preinstalled thermal grease. I put it on and turned the PC on later. I then kept having doubts about the preinstalled thermal grease. It just seemed like such a small layer of thermal grease. So, I shut it back down and took the cooler off the cpu, removed the thermal grease from the cpu and the cooler. I then put on about a pea size amount of the Corsair TM30 thermal paste and then put the cooler back on the processor. That's the way I have it running right now.

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#14
October 17, 2020 at 22:43:41
Oh, and if anyone cares, I installed the Gigabyte Aorus Liquid Cooler 360.

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#15
October 18, 2020 at 00:06:10
One thing I'm wondering too though... right now, my cpu is running high 30s to low 40s. There has been a backup running for a few hours. It seems to be using some cpu which is causing this. But, these CPUs run faster than they're rated. I'm not overclocking my CPU. But, it's a 3.6 GHz CPU and currently, according to the MSI tool, my CPU is running at 4.6 GHz. The CPU shouldn't be running faster than what it's rated unless the conditions are right... so the CPU must think it's running OK to be running a gigahertz higher than it's rated.

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#16
October 18, 2020 at 05:13:18
I’m at a loss to understand why pholks use water coolers on a domestic computer, especially as most systems are usually designed (motherboard, cpu, and graphics card) for simple air fan driven flow through the case/housing?

And in this current situation the OP states the cpu is not being overclocked - another habit some seem to fancy which has me puzzled as to why. Surely if you want a faster cpu, replace the current one designed to run thus natively - sans H2O plumbing...?


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#17
October 18, 2020 at 09:56:00
I installed a water cooler, one, to make it run cooler. I want it to run as cool as possible... and two, the coolness factor. 30 years ago, I saw a show on Tech TV where they took, I think, around a 500 MHz computer and overclocked it to 1 GHz. At the time, 1 GHz was an unheard of speed. But, they had this system where it looked like a waterfall going over the CPU to keep it cool. So, that image has always stuck with me. I think it's neat now that my PC has fans and a radiator cooling down the CPU. So, for one, to keep the CPU running as cool as possible, and two, the coolness factor. I've built a lot of computers in my day, but I never built one to look cool as well as run fast. This one, with the glass on the side of the case, I had to make it look cool as well. My CPU now has an LCD screen on top of it that shows me the cpu make and model as well as the temp which looks cool through the glass. Maybe I just have too much money and don't know what to do with it. But, I still look at this as pretty cheap. My first computer was a 486 33 and that computer cost $2,000+ at the time. Now I have this computer I built. I spent around $1,000 for all the parts. Way cooler and half the cost of what was the best at that time.

Specs of this computer...

Intel i7 9700K
MSI MPG Z390 motherboard
64 GB of Corsair RAM
1 TB SSD
4 TB HDD
MSI GeForce GTX 1650 Video card

The only components I'm reusing from my old PC are my hard drives. I'm trying to figure out if it's worth the cost to upgrade my hard drives to the NVMe drives... if I'd notice a difference. About 5 years ago, I put the first 1 TB SSD drive in. At the time, the 1 TB SSD drive cost me $1,000! That drive failed about a year ago and I bought a replacement 1 TB SSD SATA drive for around $200. Amazing how much price came down. But, I never had heard of NVMe drives until recently. My new mobo supports two NVMe drives. So, trying to decide if I want to spend the money on that last component to make this PC the best it can be.

message edited by dorlow


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#18
October 18, 2020 at 21:06:02
"The CPU shouldn't be running faster than what it's rated unless the conditions are right..."

The turbo boost of the CPU can go to 4.9Ghz. It kicks in when the OS is requesting the highest performance state of the used core CPU. The CPU has 8 cores and all can have different speeds at the same time, depending of the processes running specific core(s).

The LCD display on your box may show average speed of all 8 cores.

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/u...

Use HWiNFO64 app to see how dynamic your CPU is.


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