Solved How can I find the correct BIOS files?

September 22, 2014 at 07:26:10
Specs: Windows 8, 4gb
I have an Asus x502c laptop motherboard which is showing the classic symptoms of a corrupted bios. I want to try to flash the bios with a USB flash drive. Have checked Asus support page for the laptop and found 2 different bios headings in the downloads section. Here is a link:
http://www.asus.com/uk/Notebooks_Ul...

I am not sure if the files available are for upgrading the bios using windows or if they are for flashing. One of the files has a 208 prefix. Could this be the correct file type to be used to flash the bios?
The other files are 'winflash'.


See More: How can I find the correct BIOS files?

Report •


✔ Best Answer
September 23, 2014 at 19:04:31
Bad RAM
Bad screen or cable
Bad graphics chip if distinct graphics
Bad (shorted) main battery (remove the battery and try powering up with the power cord only)
More...
Typically BIOS is required for flashing. Incorrect flashing or severe errors including power failures are well known to permanently make a motherboard useless. Typically only the factory can push a BIOS into a badly corrupted BIOS chip (if they are willing) as well as replacing the chip itself.
Your experience flashing apparently dead/corrupted BIOS is the exception and may have been minor internal issue.
If I had more than one machine that had a BIOS issue, I would go with a different brand for future purchases. I have never had a BIOS 'go bad' and have only needed to flash a BIOS personally twice and the last one was probably 12 or 15 years ago. These were for updates to fix an issue (first) and was required to upgrade the CPU to latest available option (second).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
September 22, 2014 at 07:40:43
Go back into your BIOS & look for some indication if it's 209, 208 or whatever. You might even see it if you pause the boot.

The world is full of rats, Republicans & Democrats.


Report •

#2
September 22, 2014 at 07:45:09
One of the files has a 208 prefix.

This is the actual BIOS data file

Winflash is the software to do the flash.

You need both

What are these classic symptoms of a corrupted bios that you mention.

It is very rare to get a corrupted BIOS, so much so that a corrupted BIOS is the very last thing on the list of possibilities when there is a problem - an act a desperation almost when everything else, and I mean everything else, has failed. Unless you are trying to fix one of the problems, not of which are serious, it is unlikely a BIOS flash will help you.

Stuart


Report •

#3
September 22, 2014 at 07:51:54
The laptop has a completely blank screen and the same on an external monitor. The fan runs and two LED's illuminate.

I also suspect faulty RAM as that has a similar symptom. The problem is that I cannot change the RAM as it is integrated into the motherboard (soldered in).


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 22, 2014 at 07:54:14
I can't go back into the bios as the motherboard won't boot into bios. That is my problem and the reason for considering flashing the bios to recover it using a USB flash drive.

Thanks for response.


Report •

#5
September 22, 2014 at 08:49:41
If you cannot boot into the BIOS then you have an expensive paper weight.

In order to use a USB flash drive, you first need a working BIOS. Without a working BIOS, nothing else works. You need a working BIOS in order to flash it.

The same goes for RAM. If there is no working RAM in the machine, nothing works and flashing the BIOS will not fix that even if you could. As the RAM is soldered onto the motherboard, replacing it could be an expensive repair.

Stuart


Report •

#6
September 22, 2014 at 11:21:22
Am not sure that that is true. If the bios has become corrupted you won't be able to get a bios screen. I have repaired 2 different acer netbooks which showed exactly these symptoms. I was unable to get a bios screen with either of them . My diagnosis was correct on both of them, and I flashed the bios with a fat 32 formatted flash drive with the correct bios files obtained from the Acer website . After about 30 seconds of flashing both of these laptops booted up normally and have been working perfectly ever since.
I suspect that the same thing is wrong with this Asus motherboard. Just because , I cannot get a bios screen at present, doesnt mean that the board is toast. If the bios has failed, it may be recoverable. All manufacturers have a bios recovery procedure.

If it is the Ram that is defective, I cannot repair it.
Another possible cause is maybe the graphics chip.


Report •

#7
September 23, 2014 at 19:04:31
✔ Best Answer
Bad RAM
Bad screen or cable
Bad graphics chip if distinct graphics
Bad (shorted) main battery (remove the battery and try powering up with the power cord only)
More...
Typically BIOS is required for flashing. Incorrect flashing or severe errors including power failures are well known to permanently make a motherboard useless. Typically only the factory can push a BIOS into a badly corrupted BIOS chip (if they are willing) as well as replacing the chip itself.
Your experience flashing apparently dead/corrupted BIOS is the exception and may have been minor internal issue.
If I had more than one machine that had a BIOS issue, I would go with a different brand for future purchases. I have never had a BIOS 'go bad' and have only needed to flash a BIOS personally twice and the last one was probably 12 or 15 years ago. These were for updates to fix an issue (first) and was required to upgrade the CPU to latest available option (second).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#8
September 23, 2014 at 20:35:09
If it is a buggy bios and not some other hardware fault you'd need a dos flasher that works with that particular bios chip. As you noticed both flasher downloads are for use in a windows session

You may need to contact asus for that or try a universal flasher. (I guess you have nothing to lose by experimenting.)

If you do find a flasher I'd try to install the most recent bios--209. You may need to change the bios file extension to something the flasher understands.


Report •

#9
September 24, 2014 at 02:00:26
Thanks for your answers.
I am aware that flashing the bios has its risks. Fingers: you are right to remind me of the risks. The motherboards that I flashed were Acer and Acer are known to have issues with the bios . I am not definately going to flash the bios. I may try soldering a pre-programmed bios chip in to replace the existing one. I have located the bios chip on the board. Another possibility is to replace the graphics chip as a process of elimination.

I am aware that this could be a graphics issue, RAm etc. I don't have the skills to test for this and the RAM is integrated into the motherboard and cannot be replaced


Report •

#10
September 24, 2014 at 07:14:09
Isn't flashing the BIOS first safer than soldering?

The world is full of rats, Republicans & Democrats.


Report •

#11
September 24, 2014 at 15:59:55
I saw this video on youtube about a gpu re-flow:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6yb...

Who knows, I may be on the wrong track with the bios theory.


Report •

#12
September 24, 2014 at 19:03:01
"I saw this video on youtube about a gpu re-flow..."

Question there would be how comfortable are you taking apart the machine and using a heat-gun. The guy in that video obviously has some experience with one...it's not a first-timer's choice. And if you're wondering, I've got over 25 years of industrial-soldering experience...and still occasionally have problems with heat-guns.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Report •

#13
September 24, 2014 at 19:03:29
Most bios' have a beep code to alert you of hardware (other than bios) failure. I assume your laptop does too. Since you're now considering it may not be a bad bios you should check to see what the beep codes are for your model. Ram and video problems will have a destinct beep sequence.

Report •

#14
September 25, 2014 at 04:02:25
Thanks for responses (TRA, Davincaps).
The heat gun does have its risks.
With regard to beep codes, there dont seem to be any beeps. You just hear the fan noise.
I will maybe try connecting some headphones to the audio jack.

Report •

#15
September 25, 2014 at 08:06:27
Found this on a another forum: Bios recovery procedure for Asus:

http://forums.mydigitallife.info/th...

1.) Plug in in the FAT32 USB Stick
2.) make sure your battery and the powercord is unplugged
3.) hold FN (=Function Key/left from Windows Key) plus B Key at once
4.) (still hold and) plugin in the AC powercord.

Keep holding one of those key-combos until the Laptop starts to read from USB.
It's important to hold the key-combo from powered-off state until powered-on state
with only AC-power connected to force the recovery mode starting.
Just imagine the FN+B combo is triggering ACPI functions like
vol up/vol down, touchpad on/touchpad off but in this case it should trigger the
recovery mode.

You should see the activity leds on your stick blink while the ROM is read.


Report •

Ask Question