Solved How can I calibrate replacement 6 cell Li Ion battery?

Acer / Aspire 5738-6969
October 5, 2017 at 15:39:07
Specs: Windows 10, 4 GB
How can I calibrate replacement 6 cell Li Ion battery for my laptop using its power adapter w/cord?

Please write right steps. I know it should be fully charged and fully discharged THREE times before using, for battery's 100% performance.


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✔ Best Answer
October 7, 2017 at 22:52:45
With all due respect Fingers, I've always respected your posts but the last paragraph of your post is false.

With modern day lithium ion technology batteries and chargers, there is no way you can overcharge, nor is leaving batteries on the charger after they are fully charged going to damage them.

There is also no reason to wait until they are below 20-30% to charge them.

This may have been true in the past with NiCad or nickel metal hydride batteries but battery technology as well as charging circuits make overcharging impossible, they shut off when the battery is at its peak, then trickle charge as needed if they are left on the charger to keep them at their peak performance.

In the old days, battery chargers would use a delta algorithm of current draw to determine when rechargeable batteries were done charging. These days they use a different metering system to determine when a battery is charged. Also most charging systems are matched to internal circuitry of the battery pack itself. They never charge the battery to 100% nor let it drain below 10-15%. When a battery pack says its at 0%, it's really only discharged to about 10%, and when it says it's charged to 100%, it's really only charged to approx. 90% of battery capacity. This assures that battery life is maximized.

message edited by THX 1138



#1
October 5, 2017 at 18:40:02
Are you serious?





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#2
October 5, 2017 at 21:08:30
Plug it in and charge it overnight, do not unplug during that time.
Always try to run the battery down most of the way when ever possible before charging. This Might be slightly more important during the first few charge cycles but not by much, it is always important to get the most out of your batteries. That s not to say that if you need to have the laptop ready for an important meeting, project, etc. the next day, you need to stay up until 3 AM just to make sure it was run down enough to charge. Of course charge it whenever you will need it but avoid charging it all of the time when it will not be needed unless it is run down. I hope that this is clear, just don't stress over it.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
October 5, 2017 at 21:51:08
Li-Ion is not NiCd; its electrolyte solution is not prone to the crystallization issues that plagued rechargeable batteries 20 years ago. There is no calibration required. However, excessive heat can damage the cells and destroy the battery's ability to hold a charge, so avoid that.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#4
October 6, 2017 at 02:41:44
Hindamar wrote:

> I know it should be fully charged and fully discharged THREE times
> before using, for battery's 100% performance.

Where did you get this idea?

How would you discharge the battery without using it?

I think that contradiction is why THX asked the question he asked.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
October 6, 2017 at 07:15:37
There are ways a battery can be discharged without using it - with a load resistor for instance. Whether it is a good idea is another matter:
http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/fi...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
October 7, 2017 at 09:16:28
#2Fingers October 5, 2017 at 21:08:30

I received a Fully Charged Li Ion battery (11.1V, 5200mAh).

Please read below reply that I received from Razor2.3 on October 5, 2017 at 21:51:08.

Li-Ion is not NiCd; its electrolyte solution is not prone to the crystallization issues that plagued rechargeable batteries 20 years ago. There is no calibration required. However, excessive heat can damage the cells and destroy the battery's ability to hold a charge, so avoid that.

In the light of both replies whose instructions should I follow. I'm really confused!


message edited by Hindamar


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#7
October 7, 2017 at 22:33:24
All rechargeable battery devices recommend an overnight charge before using.
I have seen many devices with rechargeable batteries including laptops, cell phones, and many others that when tended carefully continue to have long battery use many years after purchase. I have seen same and similar products that people have charges when not needed (often), left uncharged without using, left plugged in when charging is not needed, and these users have complained of shortened battery life after only a few years. (Some people need to charge their cell phones more than once a day where others once a day or even once every other day. Some people have laptop batteries that barely get a half days use after only 2 or 3 years and others who can get the entire day on a charge after 5 years of regular use)
It is true that Lithium Ion batteries do not have the problems of Nicad batteries (at least not anywhere near the same degree) but careful battery management most of the time does lead to better product and battery life overall.
Do the full charge initially and then just be careful to avoid overcharging, unnecessary charging, leaving it plugged in after it is charged for many hours or days. Allow the battery to cool after a long time using it whenever possible before plugging in to charge it. Of course if you have to continue working then plug it in and continue working but if the battery level is at 60% then do not plug it in when using unless it gets low (say 30% or lower, maybe even below 20% if practical). When done put it to sleep and continue charging if practical or sleep and unplug if you need to transport it and charge it later when convenient.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
October 7, 2017 at 22:52:45
✔ Best Answer
With all due respect Fingers, I've always respected your posts but the last paragraph of your post is false.

With modern day lithium ion technology batteries and chargers, there is no way you can overcharge, nor is leaving batteries on the charger after they are fully charged going to damage them.

There is also no reason to wait until they are below 20-30% to charge them.

This may have been true in the past with NiCad or nickel metal hydride batteries but battery technology as well as charging circuits make overcharging impossible, they shut off when the battery is at its peak, then trickle charge as needed if they are left on the charger to keep them at their peak performance.

In the old days, battery chargers would use a delta algorithm of current draw to determine when rechargeable batteries were done charging. These days they use a different metering system to determine when a battery is charged. Also most charging systems are matched to internal circuitry of the battery pack itself. They never charge the battery to 100% nor let it drain below 10-15%. When a battery pack says its at 0%, it's really only discharged to about 10%, and when it says it's charged to 100%, it's really only charged to approx. 90% of battery capacity. This assures that battery life is maximized.

message edited by THX 1138


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#9
October 8, 2017 at 04:27:32
... and even in the old days batteries should not have been discharged until they were absolutely flat.
History lesson LOL:
http://www.solar-facts.com/batterie...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
October 8, 2017 at 10:29:45
Just to add that some folk (but not all) say you should never leave anything charging overnight in case something goes wrong:

http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/new...

EDIT:
So it seems this topic can be quite controversial and result in conflictions.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#11
October 8, 2017 at 11:40:05
The oldest lithium-ion battery I have is from a Dell laptop
made in 1997.

The Dell System User's Guide that was on the laptop when
I got it (it is the correct guide for that specific model) says:

> How to Conserve Battery Power
>
> You automatically conserve battery power each time you
> attach an AC power source to the computer. When the AC
> adapter is attached, the battery is being charged while the
> computer uses AC power. The life expectancy of your battery
> is determined largely by the number of charges it receives,
> so use an AC power source to run the computer if one is
> available.

> Charging the Battery
>
> Each time you connect the computer to AC power or install
> a battery in a computer that is connected to AC power, the
> computer checks the battery's charge and temperature.
> The AC adapter then charges the battery (if necessary) and
> maintains the battery's charge.
> ...
> NOTE: You can leave the battery in the computer as long as
> you like. The battery's built-in circuitry prevents the battery
> from overcharging.

> AC Adapter
>
> ...
> NOTE: If you are running your computer on AC power with a
> battery installed, the AC adapter charges the battery (if needed)
> and then maintains the battery's charge.

It doesn't explicitly say so, but it is clearly implied that the
charger can be left plugged in constantly.

The actual question of this thread was how to calibrate the
battery. That hasn't been addressed yet. My Dell System
User's Guide says:

> Recalibrating the Main Battery
>
> Recalibrating the battery maintains the accuracy of the
> main-battery indicator on the status display panel, the charge
> gauge on the main battery, and the battery meter. The following
> message prompts you when it is time to recalibrate the battery:
>
> You must recalibrate the battery to maintain the accuracy of
> the battery status indicators.
>
> NOTE: You do not have to recalibrate the battery immediately.
> However, the longer you delay, the less accurate the battery
> status indicators become. The message appears each time you
> boot the computer until you have recalibrated the main battery.
>
> To recalibrate the main battery, attach the AC adapter to the
> computer and leave the computer on. You may continue working
> while the recalibration process goes on. Or, it may be more
> convenient to let the battery recalibrate overnight.
>
> During recalibration, the computer completely discharges the
> main battery. The main battery activity indicator in the status
> display panel blinks and the bars on the battery status indicator
> change to show the changes in the battery charge. When
> recalibration is completed, the main-battery activity indicator
> stops blinking and the AC adapter recharges the battery.

So if Hindamar's laptop works anything like the Dell, there is
nothing to it. Just plug it in for several hours after it complains
that it wants to recalibrate.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#12
October 8, 2017 at 14:54:03
I know a lot of folk leave batteries on all night. However, for example, a charger could suddenly start overcharging so there is a safety risk. The counter argument (as I see it) is that if you never risked anything then you would never do anything - planes bolted to the runway with no engines, etc.

What can often influence folk most is some personal experience. A couple of non-battery examples that affected me:

1. Woman in an upstairs flat came downstairs "blazing" with fire one day. I managed to put the fire out but she died a month later. Since then I have had strong feelings about anyone with an unguarded gas heater.

2. When I moved to a new three storey house I was concerned that my youngest child might fall out of her bedroom window so I fitted guard rails across it. She then went to another room and fell 30ft out of that bedroom window instead. It's amazing she came round and survived. Window safety is now something I keep an eye on (grandchildren) and wonder why I didn't take this possibility into account at the time.

The clever trick is to not have to learn in these ways but unfortunately that's not always the way of life.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#13
October 8, 2017 at 20:30:33
THX: OK, I was trying to simplify and I should have not used the term overcharging related to newer battery types but I have found that unnecessary charging does shorten battery life as I have observed in actual use. My daughter's HP laptop battery going very strong after 5 years and many people who I consider their treating of the charging process as careless and begin losing run time after only a few years My daughter just told me that she still gets a full day of graphic design program work out of her 'larger' battery and more than half a day on her smaller 'light' battery. Her new boss keeps her laptop plugged in all day in the office because she cannot get long out of her battery on a much newer machine. My old cell phone still ran for 2-3 days on a charge after 4 years for me and I have seen many people getting a half day or less and borrowing chargers everywhere (at friends houses, at stores, etc.) for a 10 or 20 minute charge. I use my newer cell phone more than back then but still get 2 days use after almost 2 years.
While charge technology has improved greatly as has the batteries, I still feel that unnecessary charging even with that technology does shorten battery life and run time. I am not referring to 'deep cycle' like NiCads essentially required once in a while but always charging them may be almost as bad as leaving them in a run down condition and not charging them. Yes, some of my choice of words were probably influenced by a long history with NiCads but recent experience with Lithium batteries has shown this to me to be true in the real world and the way you treat the charging of the batteries does matter in spite of all of the improvements. I cannot tell you if it is the number of charge cycles, loss of any internal component (metal to gas loss or an electrolyte if they actually use a gas, liquid, or paste one), or another process but I have found that it does apparently make a difference.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
October 9, 2017 at 19:14:55
Fair enough. Just out of curiosity, when you compare battery life of laptops, are you comparing same brands and models?

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#15
October 9, 2017 at 20:53:04
"... when you compare battery life of laptops, are you comparing same brands and models?"
No, that would take a lot of time and money to do a direct and serious study, but I do pay attention when I hear of battery problems and older machines lasting beyond average.
With cell phones it is a little bit easier because there are less options on the better phones but there are major differences in how they are used so conclusions are quite that easy. I do see more people charging iPhones mid-day than say Samsung Androids and apps like Waze, Google Maps, Pokemon Go, and others can run batteries down quickly. But overall I do see a difference when batteries are cared for rather than being abused.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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