Help with HP/Asus Laptop choice

December 8, 2009 at 15:08:08
Specs: Windows Vista
Trying to choose between Asus & HP Laptop for everyday use..
Asus U50A RBBML05
HP DV6 2066DX
Any advice?
New to laptops, with no idea which is the better of the two. Same price range...

edited by moderator: Moved from Windows 7 Forum


See More: Help with HP/Asus Laptop choice

Report •


#1
December 8, 2009 at 15:25:11
Acer was recently cited as having less repairs than HP. That said, both were near the bottom. Look at the link below.

Why did you post this in the Windows 7 forum? This is a hardware question and you currently are running Vista. Would like to find out why users are posting in the wrong forums? I am not being critical but would like an answer, whatever it is.

http://www.ditii.com/2009/11/18/asu...


Report •

#2
December 10, 2009 at 15:14:48
I work with laptops and can tell you that the vast majority of breakdowns are caused by abuse of the computer! Most common is drink spillage, dropping the laptop and simply not treating it properly. The link supplied above which mentions HP with 16% failure rate wasn't all HP's fault, unfortunately one of their most popular models used the nVidia graphics chip that was prone to failure.
One make that was good, was Packard Bell, now part of Acer. Battery life on their computers was amazing compared to some.
Whichever make/model you choose, I would recommend you take out insurance to cover breakdown and accidental damage. Make sure you don't allow the ventilation to be hindered, and try not to move it when you are using it, this is a common cause of hard disk failure.
For what its worth I have an HP dv9000, it is perfectly ok, never given me trouble, my daughter has one sold by Novatech, its used every day almost all day, the only thing I've had to do is to fit new hard disk. Very reliable machine!
If you want to see their current range visit
http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/...

Computers... designed to entertain,help with work but most of all to frustrate you!


Report •

#3
December 10, 2009 at 15:28:50
To comment on the above points about HP. I agree they have no control over the GPU they used. That said, even after nVidia admitted they shipped defective chips HP still will not do the honorable thing. They are involved in class action lawsuits over that.

Also, HP has the shortest driver support of the printer manufacturers. They have even pulled previously written drivers off their site. IMHO they are not consumer friendly.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 26, 2010 at 16:07:39
I have to agree with you OtheHill, HP are not the consumer friendly people they like to think they are!

Computers... designed to entertain,help with work but most of all to frustrate you!


Report •

#5
January 26, 2010 at 20:34:39
Asus has a much higher chance of still running at the end of three years then HP. As far as being people friendly having worked there it is mostly bad customers causing bad customer support if they get a us tech. However most of the time you get india and then your screwed. I am a huge fan of most hp desktops but their laptops break more often then most brands besides gateway. So if you do get an hp laptop make sure to at some point buy an extended warrenty directly from hp so if it does break and you don't get india it will be fixed. also do all repairs through hp itself. If your pc breaks three times and you send it back to the repair shop in a year you maybe eligible to get a new laptop but you must send it back to hp one of those times and all of the trouble shooting and part replacement has to be done through hp.

Report •

#6
January 26, 2010 at 20:46:05
"I would recommend you take out insurance to cover breakdown and accidental damage. Make sure you don't allow the ventilation to be hindered, and try not to move it when you are using it, this is a common cause of hard disk failure."

bazzab,

Isn't mobility the whole idea behind a user acquiring a notebook instead of a desktop? -- *shrugs*

One the one hand, while I would agree with you that no laptop or even desktop is idiot-proof or immune to wanton abuse & that some form of extended warranty may be a good investment, depending on how expensive the notebook is & the type of user. One the other hand, it would be nice if you have some reliable statistics that you can link us to, to support your above claim that moving a notebook is a common cause of hard disk failures.

I can understand the risks associated with accidental dropping of notebooks, but I fail to see how simply moving a notebook is more likely to cause its internal disk to fail. Even the risk associated with accidental dropping is not as severe as it used to be, with more notebooks coming equipped with the drop-proof technology that causes the drop sensor within the notebook -- upon detecting a drop -- to shut down critical components in the machine (specifically the HDD) so as to prevent disk damage or failure.

PatriciaC,

Although, you did not actually include the specific component details for the two machines, nor the actual price of the either systems or warranty details. From what I can gather regarding the two machines, I would go with the U50A-RBBML05 from ASUS: it is the better one out of the two. Unfortunately, neither is a gaming machine, but you'd be fine with using the notebook for general everyday computing.

Windows 7 News!


Report •

#7
January 26, 2010 at 22:16:33
"To comment on the above points about HP. I agree they have no control over the GPU they used. That said, even after nVidia admitted they shipped defective chips HP still will not do the honorable thing. They are involved in class action lawsuits over that."


HP isn't the only one affected by that.

Visiontek used to use NVidia video chipset cards, until they got a huge number of defective chips from Nvidia some years back. Nvidia offered to replace the chips after the problem was discovered and huge numbers of Visiontek (and other) cards were being returned, but of course that meant Visiontek would have to make new cards again for the ones that were RMAed. They nearly went bankrupt because of that. Probably a similar situation for HP. It's easy to replace chipsets that haven't been installed yet. Eventually Visiontek decided to use ATI's/ AMD's chips exclusively, and still do.

I don't use customer support over the phone, except once in a blue moon for my ISP, so I can't comment on that. I've heard it's gone downhill over the years in general.
We used to have a new Dell call center for business computers in my city a few years back, but they vanished from here before their promised minimum 5 years had elapsed.Cheaper to do it elsewhere. They haven't repaid the city for the large subsidy they received yet, so far as I've heard.

One thing HP has is extensive online support, in comparison to some others such as Acer. Someone said they don't support printers for a long time, but they seem to support desktops and laptops for a long time. Service manuals are available for downloading on their site for most if not all of their laptops - you don't have that for some other laptop brands. Does Asus have downloadable service manuals for their laptops? They support their mboards well, but I've found they don't support some of their other products well, over time.


Report •

#8
January 27, 2010 at 05:33:30
HP is a big customer for nVidia. If HP had handled the issue correctly they would have stopped production of models that were failing and solved the problem, which I understand was overheating of the GPU.

Once HP knew of the issue why did they simply send the laptops back to the customers with the same GPU in it when they knew it would fail again. They made a lame effort to increase the cooling by adjusting the parameters for the fan.

Evidently many customers feel the same way or their wouldn't be class action lawsuits.

As far as support for legacy products goes what reason would HP have for removing drivers from their website after only three years or so? IMO if you can't get something to work anymore you will need to replace it. HP has a vested interest in forcing the purchase of new hardware when they pull existing drivers off their site.

It isn't like server space is so expensive. If that were the case then companies like Yahoo wouldn't allow you to save an unlimited amount of email.


Report •

#9
January 27, 2010 at 12:26:21
"HP is a big customer for nVidia. If HP had handled the issue correctly they would have stopped production of models that were failing and solved the problem, which I understand was overheating of the GPU."

Replacing chips or chipsets that haven't been installed in video cards or mboard yet is easy.
Replacing a few already made video cards or mboards is not big problem , but when it's thousands of them or more that have the problem that have already been made, that's a huge thing to overcome.

The class action suit should be primarily against NVidia, not whoever was stuck with installed defective NVidia chips/chipsets in their products.

"As far as support for legacy products goes what reason would HP have for removing drivers from their website after only three years or so?"

I haven't found that to be the case for , but I haven't had an HP printer myself, and I've only looked for "drivers" for a few friends and others who had old models and had no problem finding them.
Whether Windows 7 or Vista drivers are available for an old printer model is another matter - they can't be expected to provide drivers for operating system that came out long after the printer model was initially released, forever - lots of other printer makers do the same thing.


Report •

#10
January 27, 2010 at 12:35:12
tubes

We can agree to disagree. I think HP has shorter driver support across the board.


Report •

#11
February 8, 2010 at 15:43:25
OtheHill, although I own an HP laptop, and am very happy
with it, I have to agree that HP are terrible regarding any sort
of support or upgrades. The DV9000 series is not particularly
old, and is perfectly capable of running Windows 7, but HP
will not issue any driver support for it. As for customer
support, take the recent nVidia fiasco with the faulty graphics
chips, HP were totally uninterested. nVidia weren't any better
though, considering it was their lousy product that caused so
many laptops to fail, not just HP, but any unfortunate
company that used the chips they knew were flawed!!

Computers... designed to entertain,help with work but most of all to frustrate you!


Report •


Ask Question