Help troubleshooting powering problem

November 30, 2011 at 09:40:07
Specs: Windows 7, Core i5 3.4GHz / 8gb
Hi,

Thanks for taking a moment to read my question.

I recently built a computer and attempted to power on the first time. I do already think I know what the problem is but I want to verify.

When powered on, for 2-3 seconds the fans/lights turned on and then off with a temporary period of time where I couldn't power again. If I waited 30-60 seconds I could try to power again with the same result.

I have a Zalman heatsink with an Intel Core i5 2400k on a Gigabyte motherboard. I don't think I applied the thermal grease well enough and the connection between the mobo, cpu, and heatsink is not the best.

Am I right that the faulty connection with the CPU is what causes this exact problem? Everything is connected properly, and the only other reason I think is possible is that I shorted a component.

Any thoughts are welcome.


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#1
November 30, 2011 at 10:48:51
Exact Model MOBO?
Type of RAM you have?
Any beep codes at power on?
Are you using all NEW/USED components?
Your experience level?

Lack of themal paste won't cause a PC to NOT start, but, if you start it w/o proper paste, it can cause the CPU to overheat & burn out. If the mobo is healthy the overheating CPU should trigger a sensor to shut the system down though.

It's possible some hardware is bad, even with new components, but morel likely it's a configuration/setup issue. Search for "building a PC" in this forum.

MOOOOooove! OH and you're welcome!


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#2
November 30, 2011 at 11:20:25
"Lack of themal paste won't cause a PC to NOT start, but, if you start it w/o proper paste, it can cause the CPU to overheat & burn out"

Wrong. All modern CPUs have built-in thermal protection circuitry & can NOT be overheated to death. However, if no paste is used or the paste is applied incorrectly, it can prevent the system from booting.

"I don't think I applied the thermal grease well enough"

The i5 requires the "vertical line" method:

http://www.elitekiller.com/pics/AS5...

http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...


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#3
November 30, 2011 at 11:57:30
I had no idea certain CPU's had different methods to applying the thermal paste, thanks.

I think I mistakenly forgot to place the CPU power plug into the mobo.

All new parts:

Gigabyte P67X-UD3-B3 ATX
Patriot Viper Xtreme 8GB 2X4GB DDR3 1866MHZ
No beeps, never was supplied with a system speaker...know if it's built into the board?
First build, advanced experience in electronics and troubleshooting however. Thought I'd check online while at work until I can get back home and double check everything again...and if I have to start removing parts until I isolate the issue.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 30, 2011 at 12:22:33
U can check if onboard speaker is intergrated(near CMOS battery area) and if u can't find it u can purchase one and install it(speaker headers).

No video card?

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#5
November 30, 2011 at 13:13:38

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#6
November 30, 2011 at 15:30:57
"Modern" ... CPUs don't burn out? Sure...sure....(make sure you look at this pics on this link a little more than half way down the page):

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/3...

http://pubs.logicalexpressions.com/...

...just because an engineer tells you that there is thermal overload protection in the CPU circuitry...DOESN'T mean that it's FOOLPROOF. And Why take that chance?

Try running your car into a brick wall w/o wearing your seat belts and rely on the air bags to trigger...they're guaranteed to work, right?
http://defectiveairbags.legalview.com/

MOOOOooove! OH and you're welcome!


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#7
December 7, 2011 at 10:06:57
There was a single broken pin on the CPU socket unfortunately, computer runs fine now. Thanks for all the help.

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