Solved Help recalibrate battery pulled out from working laptop

October 26, 2014 at 20:12:13
Specs: Windows 7, 6 GB
The problems:

1. The battery "won't" charge to 100% (The battery meter is stuck at 99% and the fully charged icon never appears)

2. Windows will automagically TURN OFF the laptop once the battery level is 20% or so (sometimes higher, sometimes lower, but never the correct one)

3. Once #2 above happens, I can no longer starts the system without plugging in the charger - the AC adapter. I click the power button, the laptop turns on for just a few seconds and then it turns itself off automatically. I tried pressing F2, F8.. but the laptop simply doesn't give me a chance to enter those sections (F8 - Safe Mode, F2 - BIOS settings?).

From what I have read, I think the system "sees" the 20% as the battery's 0% level??

I HAVE TRIED CALIBRATING THE BATTERY - but either the battery won't calibrate itself or the system won't let the battery calibrate (discharge to 0%). I even tried this in Safe Mode but same thing happens - unexpected, automatic and annoying shut down once the battery level reaches or is about to reach 20%.

Can someone explains what's happening and what should I do? Maybe another way to discharge the battery such as USB/CD boot? Is it even possible in my case?

The battery and everything (the Windows icon, notification, etc.) were working just good until early THIS month.

Your help is very much appreciated!

- Coming Soon -


See More: Help recalibrate battery pulled out from working laptop

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✔ Best Answer
October 29, 2014 at 18:58:50
Seems to be running quite hot. Were you able to check whether vents, fans, or CPU heat-sink were fluffed up - I know it can be tricky with a laptop? I assume you were running it on a flat surface that didn't interfere with ventilation.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
October 27, 2014 at 05:13:46
You could try booting to a CD/DVD with Linux on it like Puppy Linux or Ubuntu (not install, just run off RAM). If the same happens, it may be a BIOS setting that can be changed or disabled (even if temporarily).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
October 27, 2014 at 08:32:06
Hey thanks for your response, very much appreciated.

Now if I may add these:

1. The problems started after I pulled the battery out from the laptop while it was running and possibly plugged in - but I really don't remember. I HAD to pull out the battery because I couldn't shut down the laptop by any other means and unfortunately I couldn't wait for the laptop to shut down by itself.

2. A few hours ago the unexpected shut down happened again (I was doing another troubleshooting and was hoping it would work, so I left the laptop turned on despite the problematic battery level - around 30%). So I restarted the laptop and went to the BIOS setup, and waited with hope the battery would be fully discharged. But no, that didn't happen. The laptop was simply turned off just like what happens when I tried calibrating in Safe Mode.

So do you think pulling out the battery weakened the battery cells? I previously asked ASUS but their reply, although recommends against pulling out the battery like that, suggested that it wasn't the cause.

Secondly, Windows is not yet started if we went to the BIOS setup, right? So.. I doubt that CD boot can help the calibration. But please don't get me wrong - I would have tried if I had a boot CD.

Third, I read it could also be overheating esp. that my laptop is 2 years, 8 months old since I purchased it. But then, the CPU temperature was just around 74% when the last automatic shut down occured. I'm using Battery Care and that's how I get the numbers. Is thar considered overheating?

And last but not least, one more possible solution I haven't tried is BIOS update - there is an updated BIOS on the ASUS site - but I'm not sure if it's necessary, or maybe I'm just afraid of flashing the motherboard.. not that I have never done so before but that time the battery/power was still in perfect condition, you know.

If you or anyone has any (other) suggestions or thoughts, please kindly let me know.


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#3
October 27, 2014 at 08:42:58
Might just be the battery failing.

" CPU temperature was just around 74%"
Not sure what that means - temperatures are usually given in degrees (C or F).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
October 27, 2014 at 08:55:22
Whoops.. sorry, I meant 74°C!

Maybe you're right :/, but I am really hoping it's not.

And I might have to try the BIOS update. Or go to ASUS and hopefully they can repair it for a few bucks..


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#5
October 27, 2014 at 09:41:31
Do you constantly leave your laptop on the charger?

http://www.wired.com/2013/09/laptop...


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#6
October 27, 2014 at 10:17:38
The BIOS doesn't normally suddenly need updating, if it was working in the past. BIOS updates are usually for some very specific purpose, such as accommodating a different processor etc. As you say, there are risks - best avoided unless you have some evidence that the symptoms you are getting are the subject of a BIOS update.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
October 27, 2014 at 10:26:49
I hate to admit it, but yes I do.. often times I forgot to unplug the charger, other times because I'm asleep when the battery is fully charged, and there are times when I'm just too lazy to unplug the charger..

But I read an article on Battery University that Li-ion batteries will stop charging itself once it's fully charged, so well I thought it's alright.

However, I was thinking of setting the critical battery level to 35% so that the automatic shut down could be avoided, and I also planned to not charging the battery to 100% after reading a similar article to the one you've just shared.

But then,

1. Why the fully charged icon is no longer showing up when it is indeed set to show up? (You know, right-click the taskbar, then properties and customize notification icons)

I think it's definitely an issue.


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#8
October 27, 2014 at 10:33:00
Thank you Derek. I do agree with you, but well these problems really annoys me. I couldn't even focus on my work!

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#9
October 27, 2014 at 15:00:30
Could be battery going.
You could charge the laptop with it fully off, this might top off the battery if it is not fully charging.
You could try Linux because although BIOS is active, Windows is not.
If issue still happens, look in BIOS for anything pertaining to autoshut off or battery level settings.
Leaving the laptop plugged in a few extra hours after fully charged will not harm modern laptops but it is less positive that you are not doing harm leving it plugged in for many hours extra. Then also note that a possible cause for early charger failure is leaving them plugged in all of the time after the devices have been unplugged. Here is a power strip with a switch for each outlet so you can turn off each of your charges individually if you do not want to unplug them, also note that the outlets are turned so typical chargers do not block each other: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
October 27, 2014 at 17:49:09
1. The battery does fully charging. It's just that, Windows still displays "100% available (plugged in, charging)" once and after the battery is fully charged. Secondly, the fully charged icon is not displayed. And third, it (the power notification) normally reports "99% available (plugged in, charging)", but when I unplug the charger, it says this: "100% available".

2. Yes, Windows might not be active, but I have already tried going to the BIOS setup and if it was a Windows problem (e.g. driver misconfiguration or faulty driver), I believe I could calibrate the battery (discharge it to 0% or a higher value) right from within the BIOS setup - I mean, just let the laptop running in BIOS mode and wait until the laptop shuts down. But that didn't and won't happen. And like I said, I would have tried anyway if I had a Linux boot CD.

3. I don't see anything pertaining to autoshut off or battery level settings anywhere in the BIOS setup screens. Is there such a setting in your laptop's BIOS?.. (just curious)

4. Thank you for sharing that, it looks nice and I had no idea there was such a very nifty power strip!

And just now I read this article: http://support2.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-US;2028504 - take a look at "Scenario 3: The system randomly restarts and no Stop error BugcheckCode is listed, or the computer is completely unresponsive (hard hang)", which is what was reported into the Event log every time the auto shutdown occurs. Here is the best scenario in my case:

"The Stop error BugcheckCode value is listed as zero. Circumstances can prevent writing the Stop error BugcheckCode information before the computer restarts or shuts down. In this case, a BugcheckCode value of zero is logged. Also, perhaps no Stop error occurred, and the shutdown resulted from a power loss. For example, on a portable computer, this could mean that the battery is removed or completely drained. Or, on a desktop computer, this could mean that the computer was unplugged, or a power outage occurred."

So I guess I better off send the battery to ASUS and have them check it for me.. I still don't want to believe that the battery is dying/malfunction, but if it is, then it is. I'll just have to accept it.

One thing though, is 74°C a possible overheating value? It is ~60°C at the moment.

Thanks for your help guys, I really appreciate it.


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#11
October 27, 2014 at 18:33:12
One more thing.

If this is a problem with the ACPI of the battery (or Windows, I don't know) (which is not reporting the accurate level of charge in the battery or the battery status), can a BIOS update/flash solve the problem?


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#12
October 27, 2014 at 18:52:18
BIOS updates will only solve an issue if it is specifically listed to do so. Mostly there is no need to do these during the life of a computer.

I would regard 74C as a bit cosy.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
October 27, 2014 at 19:20:07
Then I guess I have made my decision: send the battery to be serviced at ASUS.

I'm just hoping they could simply calibrate the battery and that's it. I'm not quite ready to replace the battery but I don't want to keep using it if it continues shutting down the laptop at a random interval (battery level).

I'll keep you guys posted, and if there are any other thoughts, please do let me know.


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#14
October 27, 2014 at 19:43:07
Wait.. actually I think it is or is also a overheating problem.

My charger is plugged in now (there was still 50% charge in the battery but rather than guessing when would the laptop shut down, I chose to plug in the charger) and the CPU temperature is ~65°C. It was 75°C right before I plugged in the charger!

Why is that happening? Or is it normal for aging laptops/batteries? Or is it normal for the battery to heat up when the charger is not plugged in?

[edit] BatteryCare screenshot: http://i59.tinypic.com/2cx6oes.png

message edited by Sheherazade


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#15
October 27, 2014 at 19:57:54
The CPU temperature is not much to do with battery temperature.

As often or not it is fluff in the vents or maybe inside (fans and CPU heat-sink).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
October 27, 2014 at 20:05:48
So how can I check the battery temperature?

And a side question: Will anything inside the laptop explode if the CPU (or whatever else) temperature exceeds 80°C, 90°C..? Heh.


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#17
October 27, 2014 at 20:30:54
You don't usually check battery temperature - if it feels very hot then start worrying.

CPU is Central Processing Unit. Unlikely to "explode" but could cause other issues.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#18
October 27, 2014 at 21:32:51
Thank you. I will pop back once I know the outcome.

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#19
October 28, 2014 at 19:50:27
Overheating (CPU or motherboard chipset) could cause shut down. It does sound a bit on the warm side.
Battery could be going.
Blowing out vents with a can of compressed air may help cooling.
Making sure the laptop is on a hard surface to ensure that the bottom and side vents are clear to allow cooler air to flow properly.
Ubuntu and Puppy Linux are downloadable (free) and you can burn the disk yourself. I believe that Puppy can still fit on a CD but Ubuntu I am pretty sure will need a DVD to fit on.
CPU's cannot explode. Batteries in theory can but it takes a dead short and a lot more heat than the plastic case can handle and a short that bad would burn through the battery's thin internal wires first, thereby breaking the short long before it could get that hot. In other words, do not worry about it.
You are not really calibrating the battery, you are calibrating the software to know when the battery is at it's actual levels. This is done though the output voltage of the battery and the software 'learning' how the battery's state is through history and other factors. Usually getting it to a full charge and running it down as low as it will let you is enough to do this.
Since the shutdown is at a relatively high % charge and you experienced one with the power cord attached, it is beginning to sound more like a heating issue than a battery issue unless there is a weak battery cell in the pack that is discharging faster than the rest of the pack (more likely to occur on cheap replacements than on a factory battery) and becoming a resistance to the power going through it from the other cells (sudden voltage drop).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#20
October 28, 2014 at 20:28:54
Wow thank you.

I'm still going to have the battery checked (and no it's not a replacement battery, it's the original battery that came with the laptop) and quite possibly, have someone at ASUS clean up the laptop's fans and other things need cleaning.

And secondly, I'm gonna purchase a cooler.. I never wanted to purchase it because this overheating thing has never happened..

Thanks again!


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#21
October 29, 2014 at 06:33:53
One way to test the overheating theory is to run the laptop with the battery removed. Run some labour intensive software for a short period or a freeware stress tool like this:

http://www.snapfiles.com/get/heavyl...

It won't be long before you know whether you can rule out overheating or not.


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#22
October 29, 2014 at 16:05:08
I don't think I'm brave enough to try that.. the battery is already giving me troubles and if I intentionally burden the laptop like that, then other things might go wrong, too.

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#23
October 29, 2014 at 16:53:14
Nothing bad can happen by doing this if the battery is removed whilst running the laptop.

Have the laptop on a hard flat surface, such as a dining room table or desk.

Run the software and wait to see what happens. If the laptop powers off the issue will rule out the battery and could be a big chance that overheating needs to be dealt with.

If you are still unsure though, let the experts take a look at it. It will give you peace of mind.

message edited by btk1w1


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#24
October 29, 2014 at 17:59:56
The percentage which triggers the automatic shutdown is now getting higher. I created "Power Saver 2", a duplicate of the "Power Saver" plan - but with the low battery level set to 40%, and it worked once (I mean, the low battery notification appeared) before I noticed the percentage has increased to about 45% and obviously the notification no longer appears. The percentage is not consistent, though.

Can you do me a favor? If you look at this screenshot: http://i62.tinypic.com/negjn6.png or http://i58.tinypic.com/2zylb0n.png - which ones that can tell if the laptop is overheating or is about to overheat?

And even if this is an overheating issue, it is still weird that the fully charged icon/notification is no longer showing up.

message edited by Sheherazade


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#25
October 29, 2014 at 18:58:50
✔ Best Answer
Seems to be running quite hot. Were you able to check whether vents, fans, or CPU heat-sink were fluffed up - I know it can be tricky with a laptop? I assume you were running it on a flat surface that didn't interfere with ventilation.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#26
October 30, 2014 at 03:21:07
No, I haven't had a chance to do so and because it's pretty tricky, tomorrow I'm going to get a computer technician to clean the vents, fans and CPU heat-sink.

I would also ask him to check the battery condition and hopefully it doesn't need to be replaced/repaired..


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#27
October 30, 2014 at 10:09:33
OK, keep us posted - thanks

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#28
November 13, 2014 at 03:56:48
Hey guys,

Sorry for the delay in my response, I didn't mean to keep you in wonder.

So I ended up doing the cleaning myself because I'd rather disassemble the laptop myself than letting someone else do it for me. But I did consult a technician and he suggested me to get a new battery, and I guess I have to agree, because:

1. The battery is actually no longer charging to full - that's why Windows never shows the "fully charged" notification anymore. It's just that I didn't realize it's the battery that indeed not charging to full, so I blamed Windows (ACPI management).

2. Like I have told you before, the battery won't discharge to 0% or the lowest possible it could be. And that's why the "low battery" notification no longer shown by Windows.

3. Two or three days ago, the battery stopped charging itself - Windows now displays "plugged in, not charging" notification in the system tray and even when the laptop is not running/turned-on, I could see the charging indicator blinking (in orange) and never stops (which would change the color to yellow); so I removed the battery and for the time being, my laptop is running plugged in all the time and without any problems - no automatic shutdown except when there is a power outage.

So I'm going to get a new battery soon, hopefully..

Last but not least, here are some screen captures which shows my laptop was pretty dirty..

http://i58.tinypic.com/2s7hw5k.jpg
http://i61.tinypic.com/4r2bgp.jpg
http://i62.tinypic.com/35k94d2.jpg
http://i61.tinypic.com/30c8zgp.png
http://i59.tinypic.com/syt280.png

As you can tell from the last screen capture, there was about 20% decrease in the THRM temperatures after I cleaned my laptop. So maybe there was a slight overheating, which probably damaged my battery (all of sudden).


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#29
November 13, 2014 at 04:30:36
The cleaned heat sink: http://i60.tinypic.com/sc6d06.jpg (or direct link, if this works: http://oi60.tinypic.com/sc6d06.jpg)

I think I would buy a vacuum for cleaning the heat sink and the vents because cleaning them manually is a real pain in the a$$.

So I guess that's all and thank you to all of you who have helped me troubleshooting the battery problems!


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#30
November 13, 2014 at 06:36:58
Just to add that many helpers suggest avoiding a vacuum cleaner for this as there is a risk of it causing static and zapping something.

I've found a small paint brush and a can of compressed air works well with precious little risk.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#31
November 14, 2014 at 00:47:18
Alright thank you, I'll keep that in mind.

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#32
November 16, 2014 at 00:35:19
As much as I hate to bump an old thread, I noticed something:

On the links where you supply the temperature info, you can see the battery's designed capacity, current capacity and full capacity (in watt-hours). Just by looking at those numbers I can tell you it's time for this battery to be replaced. Being worn to 58% could quite possibly be a factor in having a bad cell like someone mentioned earlier.

However, keeping your computer clean of dust and junk can be a big help. I personally clean all my PC's weekly, considering the massive dustbowl I live in.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#33
November 16, 2014 at 16:30:38
Thank you for your help.

I'm not actually too sure about the wear level there because it is not consistent and what's weird to me is, the wear level shown by HWMonitor normally starts at about 40% and the last time I checked (when the battery was still usable), the wear level suddenly increased to over 60%. This had happened before and I'm just saying the value was so not consistent. But maybe that's also an indication of a dying battery, I don't know. And there is another software called BatteryInfoView, which gives a more consistent (but not necessarily accurate) battery wear level info - see this screenshot:

http://i62.tinypic.com/240yfea.png (Or direct link: http://oi62.tinypic.com/240yfea.jpg)

I have no intention to extend this thread, though. :)

- Sher


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#34
November 16, 2014 at 18:08:21
Can't say I'm at all convinced about any of those battery condition programs, other than using them as a rough guide. You either put batteries through a proper charge/discharge load test and compare the results with manufacturers parameters or do what most folk do and just change them when it looks as if they are starting to give trouble.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#35
November 16, 2014 at 20:44:05
That would be the second best answer. Thank you.

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