Solved Help! Problems after CMOS battery change - Partitioned HD

May 13, 2016 at 10:47:21
Specs: Windows XP, Dell XPS 420 6 RAM
Hello all,

I have a Dell XPS 420 that I have thousand of family pics and videos on that I haven't backed up in while. (I know how bad that is!) Anyway, my wife said she saw a screen that was blue and looked like something was scanning or cleaning and then later the screen went black and said "Alert: System Battery is low."

I came home to this and googled it and following a video... replaced the 3v lithium battery on the motherboard. Then when I restarted it, it booted normal without the warning and then went to the screen where I have to choose Windows Vista or XP. (I had someone partition my hard drive so I could use some expensive old programs in 32 bit xp when I got a 64 bit vista) When I select either windows operating system it starts to load windows and then flashes blue for 1/10 of a second, goes black and then starts back over again with a reboot.

I videotaped it doing this and checked the video in slow motion and found the blue screen that flashes says to run chkdsk/f.

After more research on this great site I found that I might have BIOS trouble due to the battery change. I have never done anything in BIOS but I gave it a shot and reset the date and time.

It still doesn't work. I am assuming that my partitioned drive with 2 operating systems is the problem and I need to set that back up in BIOS??? Any idea what I can do next? I hope it isn't a hard drive failure. Thanks in advance to anyone who can help!


See More: Help! Problems after CMOS battery change - Partitioned HD

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✔ Best Answer
May 14, 2016 at 14:53:26
Download and burn to DVD an ISO for ubuntu - ubuntu.com.

Boot with that DVD. It will load a linux variant into RAM only. (Do NOT) opt to install it - merely run it from the DVD.

It will present a windows style desktop; from where you can locate the hard drive. Then you simply locate your files etc. and copy/burn them to DVD.

There is also puppy linux which is simpler form of a linux variant; and allows similar options.

http://puppylinux.org/main/How%20to...

I have used ubuntu but only know of puppy linux; and those here who have used puppy linux speak well of it.



#1
May 13, 2016 at 10:56:45
Your problem is related to the battery change. Do NOT mess with any software, partitioning, etc. Removing the battery reset the BIOS to its defaults. You will have to enter the BIOS & besides changing the date/time, all the other settings need to be changed back to where they were before the reset. My guess is the SATA controller setting is the one that's causing the problems. Make sure it's set to AHCI.

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#2
May 13, 2016 at 13:16:53
i can't find the SATA controller in BIOS mode. When I go to boot sequence it shows:

1. Onboard or usb floppy drive (not present)
2. Onboard SATA Hard Drive (not present)
3. ST3750630AS
4. Onboard or USB CD-ROM

Under "Drives" it lists SATA - 0 as the drive with the id listed above (#3). It says this device is controlled by RAID BIOS

Does that help?

message edited by ohno


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#3
May 13, 2016 at 13:38:49
Look under Onboard Devices > SATA Operation.

https://timwolverson.files.wordpres...


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Related Solutions

#4
May 13, 2016 at 13:43:33
When I do that it says:

Onboard Devices:
Integrated NIC
Integrated Audio
USB Controller
Rear Quad USB
Rear Dual USB
Front USB
1394 Controller
MiniView Controller
Media Accelerator

That is all it says...


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#5
May 13, 2016 at 14:22:48
Does your BIOS screen look like the screenshot in the link I provided? If the SATA setting isn't listed under Onboard Devices, try each & every other menu option until you find it.

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#6
May 13, 2016 at 18:59:00
In BIOS under Drives; can you turn off the RAID function?

Turn on SMART reporting.

This system is about 6-7 years old? Have you replaced the hard drive before?
In not, the trouble could started because of a degrading HDD.

Manual page 179:
http://downloads.dell.com/manuals/a...

message edited by sluc


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#7
May 13, 2016 at 19:07:12
Yes. I do see an option to turn off RAID function. (under DRIVES ad then SATA operation. Should I do that?

Yes the system is 7 years old and I haven't backed it up in forever. (kicking myself now). I have not ever replaced the hard drive.

I am fine getting a new computer or new HD but I want to get my stuff off of the HD before I do. I have back up drive I just bought to do it if I can just get windows to open...


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#8
May 13, 2016 at 19:53:25
The ST3750630AS is your hard drive. It may be set up in bios in IDE mode, especially since you've got XP on it. Since it's booting at least to a blue screen and since the problem seems to have started while the computer was in use and before the battery was changed out I'm thinking the problem is not with the bios. That leaves a bad drive or corrupted OS. Can you boot to safe mode in either of the OS's using the F8 boot menu?

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#9
May 13, 2016 at 20:17:04
No. If I choose either operating system (vista and xp) and try safe mode it starts windows, flashes a blue screen for 1/10 of one second.... goes black and reboots.

But If hit f8 at the operating system choice screen... it gives me these options....

Safe Mode
Safe Mode with Networking
Safe Mode with Command Prompts

Enable Boot Logging
Enable low resolution video
Last known good configuration
Directory services restore mode
Debugging Mode
Diable Automatic Restart on System Failure
Disable Driver Signature Enforcement

Start WIndows Normally

Description: Start Windows with only the core drivers and services. Use when you cannot boot after installing a new device of driver.

------- That is what my choices are if I hit F8 at the operating system choice page...

message edited by ohno


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#10
May 13, 2016 at 20:27:31
Enabling 'Disable Automatic Restart on System Failure' will cause the boot process to stop at the blue screen and not continuously reboot. That way you can read the complete screen but since you've video taped it that might not matter anymore.

You can try the other safe mode options and see if you can get it to boot to something or maybe you can then run chkdsk. Don't use the /f option just yet. That will make permanent changes that may not be needed.


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#11
May 14, 2016 at 05:29:26
I usually try "Last Known Good Configuration" at this point as this will repair corrupted system files and registry back to prior good boot.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
May 14, 2016 at 09:41:39
As there are files (personal "stuff" assorted) on the drive in question which you wouldn't like to lose..., perhaps set about accessing and safeguarding those first...?

Can be done a couple of ways.

message edited by trvlr


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#13
May 14, 2016 at 14:19:02
Thanks everyone! You all are nice people. I will try "last known good configuration" but before i do..

trvlr, how can I safeguard my files (family pics, small business records, etc)??


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#14
May 14, 2016 at 14:53:26
✔ Best Answer
Download and burn to DVD an ISO for ubuntu - ubuntu.com.

Boot with that DVD. It will load a linux variant into RAM only. (Do NOT) opt to install it - merely run it from the DVD.

It will present a windows style desktop; from where you can locate the hard drive. Then you simply locate your files etc. and copy/burn them to DVD.

There is also puppy linux which is simpler form of a linux variant; and allows similar options.

http://puppylinux.org/main/How%20to...

I have used ubuntu but only know of puppy linux; and those here who have used puppy linux speak well of it.


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#15
May 14, 2016 at 19:50:19
Thanks so much for responding again. I will give it a try and get back to you. I will need to get to another computer to burn the DVD so it will probably be tomorrow before I can see if it will work.

THANKS YOU ALL!!!


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