Solved Help me with laptop battery charger polarity, please

Toshiba Satellite c655-s5082 laptop
June 2, 2015 at 20:16:04
Specs: Windows 7Ultimate (64 bits), Intel Core i3-2350M (2.3GHz) / Kingston 2x2gb DDR3
Hi people, I have an ASUS x200ca netbook, but I lost the charger, I got a connector already and I want to use an old Dell charger also 19v, but I dont know the polarity of the original charger connector to fix the 2 wires, maybe someone can tell me?

The original charger is this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Original-Ge...

Also: Its about 1.75a but my Dell charger is 3,5a, maybe this is a problem?

Thanks in advance!

Mobo: Intel(R) DG41RQ
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E7500 @ 2.93GHz
RAM: Kingston 2MB PC2-6400 (400 MHz)
Video: nVidia GEFORCE 8400GS 512MB
Audio: Realtek High Definition Audio

message edited by Takeru


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#1
June 3, 2015 at 01:03:47
✔ Best Answer
Look on the bottom of the laptop and of the laptop where it shows some of the specs. There's usually a polarity symbol:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...

Or you may be able to check its specs in the manual. Most laptop now are positive polarity; that is the outside metal shield of the plug is negative while the inside is positive. If the Dell charger show the same polarity as what the Asus needs then you don't have to worry about that.

But if the wires are cut then you need to use a DC voltmeter to determine which wire from the charger is positive and which is negative. For the cut off plug you'd use an ohmmeter to determine which wire goes to the shield and which connects to the inside of the plug.

OR you can just temporarily connect the plug to the charger one way and then use a DC voltmeter to determine if the polarity is correct. If it's not just switch the connections. When making the connection permanent I slide on some heat shrink tubing and then solder the wires together. let the solder cool and then slide the tubing over the solder and put a match to it so it shrinks tightly over the connection.

The difference in amperage shouldn't be a problem. As long as the voltages are the same--19 v--the additional amperage won't be 'forced' into the laptop. The laptop will take what it needs.

Hey, I just took a close look at the second picture of the charger in your link. It shows it's positive polarity.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#2
June 5, 2015 at 22:38:43
Thank you very much Daveincaps! I follow your instructions and now the new charger works like a charm!

It was definitivelly positive polarity and now everything works fine and it seems to charge the battery a little bit faster.

Thanks again Daveincaps :)

Mobo: Intel(R) DG41RQ
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E7500 @ 2.93GHz
RAM: Kingston 2MB PC2-6400 (400 MHz)
Video: nVidia GEFORCE 8400GS 512MB
Audio: Realtek High Definition Audio


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#3
June 5, 2015 at 23:37:21
You're welcome. Thanks for posting back. I'm glad it worked out.

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#4
June 6, 2015 at 02:05:25
I had to look at that photo of the charger for almost a minute
before I found the little diagram you pointed out, that shows
which part of the plug is positive and which is negative.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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