Solved HDD's & SSD's Using Installed Programs

April 2, 2018 at 00:03:16
Specs: Windows 10
As a new builder there are so many things that I need to understand but know I'll learn just during the process itself my question is this. After installing your HDD and SSD and now you have your OS running thru your SSD what happens during installations of programs like games music whatever? I've never done this before so I have no Idea how this works. I know all installations will be onto my HDD. So can I run installed programs on another Hard Disk(my HDD)while using my SSD as my OS and how does that work?

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✔ Best Answer
April 11, 2018 at 03:21:15
1.clone HDD to your SSD (if it is still empty)
2.change bios settings to your PC will boot from the SSD
3.boot from SSD (which now has all the HDD files including the OS)
4.fromat the HDD as FAT32 or NTFS
5.use HDD as bulk storage & SSD as boot-drive
6.wait for other users to go into further detail on my comment

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.5GHz@1.385v | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
ASUS Z170K | Samsung 250GB SSD 850 EVO
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1393@1.193v/1930 BiosMod



#1
April 2, 2018 at 04:50:24
Can you clarify what is on the SSD (presumably now the Primary /hard drive) and what is on the HDD (presumably now set as a slave/second drive)?

What operating system(s) etc.?

Typically one has the booted OS on the primary - and usual apps etc. too; but the latter can be on the second drive - as long as they are installed via the primary OS - and the location for the app is changed during setup to the second (HDD in your case) drive.

The default location for apps etc. is of course to the primary (booted OS) drive/partition. But it isn't written in stone that they "must" be there, and the location can be changed during the installation of the apps. etc.. The registry of the OS will record exactly where everything is once an/any application etc. is installed; and if some things are on the second drive, that will be entered in the registry.

More common is to put personal files etc on the second drive and leave OS/apps/utilities etc. on the primary drive.


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#2
April 2, 2018 at 05:59:50
All programs will install by default on your primary drive which is your C drive and your SSD drive. As mentioned, you can choose custom when installing the programs and change the drive letter to the secondary drive but unless your SSD drive is very small, it is best to install your programs (at least your utilities, important programs, games, and anything you would like to load and work quickly) on the SSD as well. Your secondary hard drive is best used for storing your personal files but can be used for running programs where speed and quicker loading is not important.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
April 2, 2018 at 08:09:42
oh I see, but I can set it that I can play games thru my HDD while on my OS/SSD. Whats the downside of doing things this way as in using installed programs that are on my HDD?

message edited by KingCeszar


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Related Solutions

#4
April 2, 2018 at 20:52:24
You cannot use programs that may already be on your hard drive from a previous installation of Windows, you must install them to your current operating system. You can choose what drive to install them on but there is no advantage to installing them to the slower hard drive unless you purchased an SSD drive that is too small for Windows and all of your programs. Many who adopted early SSD's but could not afford the price of larger drives, purchased smaller ones but it was apparent that they could only handle the operating system and if careful a few important programs or games before they would have issues. Now that the price has come done quite a bit a drive 240GB or larger is affordable and can handle quite a few programs and use the hard drive only for the space hungry files (pictures, videos, spreadsheets, Photoshop files, etc.).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
April 3, 2018 at 02:55:46
re’ running programmes already installed via an OS on a drive that is now second/slave drive. I have found from own my experience, with some versions of windows and some applications, installed as just above, that they will run fine when used that way; i.e. the system is booted by an OS on the Primary and some of those applications on the now second/slave drive, will run. But... not all can be guaranteed to. It’s a matter of trial and see...

This was certainly the situation with win-9x, W2K and XP. But it was hit ‘n miss.


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#6
April 9, 2018 at 21:02:11
@Fingers yea but I have no intentions on putting any games on my SSD. I have too many and future ones will be too big so my question is how do I install steam into my primary drive, the SSD, and ply the Steam games thru the regular HDD?

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#7
April 10, 2018 at 20:58:40
When you install a program you select the Custom option that is available on 95% of all programs and games. Then you choose the drive you want to install it on. To make the program save to a different drive or folder you may need to go to the forums for that game and see if it is possible, most games typically save games as far as I know to a folder within the programs folder which is on the drive you installed it on. You can try identifying the correct folder, moving it to the other drive and placing a short cut to it in its place, naming it the same as the folder (without the words 'short cut') and that might work.
The advantage of the SSD drive is its read and write speeds. The advantage of saving files to a different drive than the programs is that when the one drive is tied up saving files the other is free to load components that may be needed for future steps or processes (especially with the limits of a mechanical drive).
If you have too many games your choice is to either opt for a 500GB SSD or choose the most important games to include on the SSD drive. I do not game a lot but typically my SSD drive is about half used with over 100GB free. That is still a lot of programs and games to fill it up. Now Pictures, Videos, Music, Photoshop files, even Excel files can take up a lot of room which is why most of us have 1TB or larger hard drives for storage.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
April 10, 2018 at 22:21:25
hmmm, I see. Well i"m going to have to figure out how to play Steam games that are stored on a different drive because I can't, or I just wont, load them into my Solid State Disk.

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#9
April 11, 2018 at 03:21:15
✔ Best Answer
1.clone HDD to your SSD (if it is still empty)
2.change bios settings to your PC will boot from the SSD
3.boot from SSD (which now has all the HDD files including the OS)
4.fromat the HDD as FAT32 or NTFS
5.use HDD as bulk storage & SSD as boot-drive
6.wait for other users to go into further detail on my comment

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.5GHz@1.385v | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
ASUS Z170K | Samsung 250GB SSD 850 EVO
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1393@1.193v/1930 BiosMod


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#10
April 11, 2018 at 12:24:41
ok thx. I hope I can follow all that and it works for me. only question is how would it work cloning a 4tb disk into a 250gb disk? like I totally can't see that happening but then again I don't know how cloning in pc terms work. the SSD would obviously be to small the way I'm seeing the process right now.

message edited by KingCeszar


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#11
April 11, 2018 at 13:30:49
also, after looking this up it seems I have to have windows already installed and that won't be the case since all of this will happen after I finish building the PC.

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#12
April 11, 2018 at 14:01:18
re’#10... you can’t put a quart into a pint pot; and certainly not several gallons...

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#13
April 11, 2018 at 14:15:56
yea I realize that now after looking this up but his solution requires me having an OS running to begin with and that would not be the case. after I'm finished building I'll boot up the system to see which drive I want as my start up drive, I'll pick the SSD. The larger drive will have all the other stuff right, like my steam games. My questions are AGAIN does that set up work? How does it work? If my Steam Client is in the SSD will the games run when they're in another drive and then how does modding those games work? obviously I'd have to put the mod into the game file I'd figure but will that work when that game file is not in the main Steam Client Folder?

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#14
April 11, 2018 at 15:26:32
Generally... one puts the OS and applications etc. on the primary (boot) drive, and data, even some downloades too..., on the second drive if exists.

Likewise it is generally possible to have the OS on on the primary drive, anti-virus etc. there too; and applications - most games included - on the secondary. Possibly there are still some games which insist on being installed in the primary partition (or whichever partition has the booted OS); but not being a gamer (apart from one or two basic games...) I can’t speculate further in that regard.

There were someb games in the days of dos and early dos based windows (but not win 9x and later) that insisted on being installed in the primary partition (or the partition holding the booted OS); and it took a little know how to edit the file contents to change that. There were two utilities that allowed that: Norton and PC Tools.

The only way I think you’ll know for sure re’ games various being installed on the secndary and happy there with the OS in the primary - is to test the hypothesis?

message edited by trvlr


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#15
April 11, 2018 at 17:20:50
Note: when building a system with two or more drives plug in only the primary boot drive (in this case the SSD drive) during the Windows install. Once Windows is installed, updates done, AV program installed, then you plug in the secondary hard drive and format it from Disk Manager. This prevents Windows installer from accidentally placing any boot required components onto the second drive which would make the boot drive dependent on the secondary drive to always be available (bad if it fails, taking both down). The same is true if you have multiple partitions on a single drive (not done as often now), you create only the first partition before the install, leaving the rest of the drive unallocated) as the only way to be sure that Windows is installed on the first partition (I had one system where the primary partition was the second one physically because of that for like nine years).
Windows will happily install on a 120GB SSD drive but for nearly the same price, a 240/250GB SSD should be able to contain all of your programs.
Your games primarily run in RAM once loaded and details are probably brought up periodically depending on the progress of the game. This part will feel snappier if the game resides on the SSD drive entirely. Saved game progress should not matter where it is saved because it needs to be loaded one at the beginning of the session but the gaming software needs to be able to find it. This is where you may need persons familiar with the particular game to help you with it for their experiences, possibly on forums dedicated to that particular game.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
April 11, 2018 at 21:48:09
how do either of you feel about a Hybrid Disk? because I've decided to go that route and get a 2tb hybrid drive paired with my 4tb HDD. from what I've read up I think that's the best way for me to go.

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#17
April 12, 2018 at 01:20:30
re #16

HDD vs SSHD vs SSD:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iB...

as for re #10

i did not even feel like mentioning it as it seemed quite obvious you cannot put something big into something smaller

here is a free tool for cloning storage drives:
https://www.easeus.com/backup-utili...

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.5GHz@1.385v | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
ASUS Z170K | Samsung 250GB SSD 850 EVO
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1395@1.193v/1930 BiosMod


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#18
April 12, 2018 at 21:19:16
"how do either of you feel about a Hybrid Disk? "

https://www.lifewire.com/solid-stat...

I know I have stated that I am against these hybrid drive (SSHD) drives. They use a tiny solid state drive (8GB roughly) mounted inside of a hard drive that works like a large cache so things like booting and some often used programs might load faster. They do not have the speed of an SSD drive. They do not use the SSD component to save anything really. Most are apparently being promoted by Seagate which I have found over many years to be less reliable than any Western Digital drive or SSD drive I have owned. You can use a flash drive and activate Intel's smart drive tech and use the flash drive for the same purpose. In fact, you might have a 16GB or 32GB Flash drive lying around since purchasing a larger one and your cost would be Zero.
In my opinion, either stay with a good fast hard drive or use your old hard drive for storage and go with a 240 to 250GB SSD drive for real speed. If your motherboard supports M2 PCIe drive technology then your SSD drive can be more than 3 times faster than even a SATA SSD drive (though it probably still is more expensive but less than last year already).
A Hybrid drive make some sense in a thin or small laptop with only one drive bay where larger SSD drive are still expensive but for desktop computers, not really at all. My opinion of course.

"I've decided to go that route and get a 2tb hybrid drive paired with my 4tb HDD."
The guide I use to determine future drive size is: How full was the drive on your old computer? If you store a lot of stuff and your 4TB drive was more than half full then maybe a 4TB or larger drive makes sense. If your 4TB drive has only 500GB filled then why do you need that plus another 2TB drive? Windows 7 takes up 40GB roughly and bloats to maybe 60GB total. This means that a 100GB drive is enough to run even Windows 10 if that is all that is on it. If you add Office and a bunch more larger programs for 2GB to maybe 10GB each that means that the drive would need 100GBto 120GB used so for safety and margin for the future, a 240GB drive is plenty using my guide above assuming that most of the storage is going to be on the larger hard drive you already own. That is the sweet spot and the best price range right now for SSD drives. If you can afford it, getting a 480GB/500GB model has some advantages in speed and even efficiency, but not a lot. With that size SSD drive you can use it for most current storage and use the larger drive for moving older, bulkier, and less often accessed files onto. SSD drives even more so than hard drives are best when they have at least 15% free space and 20% or more is best for performance and efficiency.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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