Have to constantly remove+replace CMOS, very slow OS

September 6, 2012 at 03:18:28
Specs: Windows 7
So last week my techie cousin decided to clean out my computer because I found out my CPU temps were dangerously high and found that the poor CPU was caked with dust. We used one of those super powerful air blowers to clean out the case (stupid idea btw) and after that, my computer refused to start. We ended up having to take everything out and reseat everything and it started to work again. He also decided to replace the CMOS battery with a new one, flash my BIOS and update it, but ever since then I've had this problem where my os (Windows 7) would eventually start to slow down and become unusable. When I turn off the computer and turn it back on, all the fans and what not in the case would run, but the computer itself won't start until I take out the CMOS battery and put it back in after a couple of minutes.

What's weird is that I looked at the event viewer in windows 7, and it said one of my hard drive's had bad sectors. I ran chkdsk and it seemed to fix it temporarily, but after that it went back to the same problem and I still have to remove+replace the CMOS battery on startup. I've already tried several different batteries but the problem still persists.

Could I have maybe damaged the mobo when I was cleaning out the case? :(


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#1
September 6, 2012 at 03:37:41
Motherboard damage is possible if you don't use one of those compressed air aerosols that are designed specially for blowing dust out of a computer case. These aerosols emit only dry air at a safe pressure, whereas any other type of blower can emit water vapour & damage delicate components if the pressure is too high.

If the bad sectors being reported are on your system drive (the drive on which Windows is installed) you should test it with the drive manufacture's diagnostic software for DOS which runs from a bootable CD. The links are here: http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...


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#2
September 6, 2012 at 03:57:09
In addition to the above very good advice:
Whenever you reset your CMOS by jumper or by removing the battery, you then need to reenter your BIOS set up and first reset defaults (or if available, reset to optimal settings) and then go back and fine tune those settings to run your system properly. These might include SATA settings to ACHI mode, PCIe video mode, boot order, hard drive selection, memory settings, CPU settings, power settings, and more. This, your tech friend should have done and showed you when her reset it the first time. I am not sure why he felt it necessary to flash the BIOS for this since it would have been an unnecessary risk. He sounds like a good friend, but not as good a tech.
Also run Memtest86 from a bootable CD the same way to test your memory for problems.
Install HWMonitor to check what your temperatures are now to make sure that he did not disturb the CPU's heat sink and to be sure that it does not need to be reset properly.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
September 6, 2012 at 10:29:21
Ran the diagnostic (not the DOS version) and it failed the drive self test, but it passed the SMART check and short generic test. I'm backing up all my files now and will probably try a reformat to see if that fixes anything. I have not yet turned off my computer nor has windows started acting sluggish like it usually does, so I'll see if the CMOS problem still persists after backing up my stuff.

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#4
September 6, 2012 at 21:44:26
The DOS version run from a bootable CD means that your test is not by the sector the program or windows is on and you will get a true test.
Run the Long Test for a more thorough test.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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