Hard Drive not always working

Microsoft Book/cd: office outlook 2003...
December 2, 2009 at 10:53:21
Specs: XP Home, P 4 3.2 / 2GB
On occasions when I have switched on first thing in the morning one of my drives does not always fire up. My operation system is on another drive. When booting up you can hear every now and then tiny little clicks. To get over this I have to switch off completely and do a hard re start. Drives then ok.
Latter in the day when I switch on all seems to be ok…..Is my drive trying to tell me something.

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#1
December 2, 2009 at 12:28:33
Yes, it's telling you to backup anything you don't want to loose fast, before it stops working for ever. Do it now, not later!

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#2
December 2, 2009 at 12:40:58
I had an old drive that came with an HP that started clicking after about 4 year of use. I have seen this before as the first signs of failure so I ran out and over paid for a new larger drive swapped the data and all was well. About six months later I was given a bunch of old parts, just for kicks I put them all together all I was lacking was a hard drive so I put in the one I knew was failing just to see if the system would work. I had to reformat and reinstall a OS on the drive but all went well. Still clicking. It is still clicking now 5 years later.

The moral of the story: I have always been told a clicking drive is a sure bet it will be a failed drive soon. I have seen this to be true in all but one case, this one. It may not fail in the next 10 minutes or next 10 days but it may be worth it to be safe rather than sorry.


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#3
December 2, 2009 at 14:20:10
You may enable S.M.A.R.T. in your system BIOS.
If anything is wrong with the drive, S.M.A:R:T. will display a message on screen.

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Related Solutions

#4
December 2, 2009 at 14:55:53
SMART is a good first step. However, it is a general type of performance measurement. For a more precise test, download the drive fitness utility from the manufacturer of your hard drive.

Contrary to advise some other here give, I always enable SMART in the BIOS on machines I am setting up.


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#5
December 2, 2009 at 15:28:31
OtheHill

However, it is a general type of performance measurement.

It is not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.M.A....


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#6
December 2, 2009 at 15:40:43
paulsep

I know all that. Perhaps my choice of words was not good. What I mean is that each drive manufacturer tailors their fitness test to their particular drives.

For example the thresholds on a green 5400RPM drive will not be the same as a 7200RPM Raptor. For best results you should use the fitness test designed for the drive.


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#7
December 2, 2009 at 16:09:30
Yepp, ok.
What I meant with enabling S:M.A.R.T. is, that it's always a good idea to uses this, because you will be warned on the BIOS startup screen, if something went wrong with the hard drives.
Mostly, when one gets a message from the S.M.A.R.T. system, one can get a backup of the whole drive or at least the necessary data and also in most cases, the hard drive dies within a few hours or days.

But anyway, PaulPaul can figure out, whether there is a problem on the hard drives in a simple way.


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#8
December 2, 2009 at 16:15:55
paulsep

If you refer back to my #4 I stated I always enable SMART. I have heard others state that SMART gives false alerts. I personally have not had that happen to me but even if I did, so what. Once SMART alerts you need to verify your backups are current and then run the dedicated fitness test. That test is a requirement to get an RMA under warranty anyway.


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#9
December 2, 2009 at 16:41:35
I agree !

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