Solved hard drive at 100%

November 20, 2013 at 13:46:01
Specs: Windows Vista, Intel core due P8600 / 8GB RAM
Lately, my hard drive seems to be treading at 100% capacity almost constantly. I have tried defragging but didn’t help much. Any suggestions?

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✔ Best Answer
November 21, 2013 at 11:00:56
Run MalwareBytes freebie on it just to see what it finds and fixes. Green icon top right here:
http://www.filehippo.com/download_m...

It often finds and fixes what AV's can miss.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
November 20, 2013 at 15:10:55
If the HDD is full, it's full. Start deleting, uninstalling, copying files to other media, etc.

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#2
November 20, 2013 at 19:15:49
Sorry for not making it clear. It's far from being full (~60% full), it's just keeps grinding 100% almost all the time. I already tried stopping the auto defrag but it didn't help.

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#3
November 20, 2013 at 19:58:01
Defragging won't free up much hard drive space and if you've got some auto defrag going, yeah, turn that off. You don't need a lot of crap running in the background.

Are you sure it's the hard drive showing full and not cpu usasge? If it is the drive, does it actually fill up and then drop back down or is it a false message? If it's a false message there's some malware called 'system fix' that can generate those messages:

http://www.uninstall-spyware.com/un...

What size hard drive is it? If it is really filling up then it must be the swap file which means your system must not be using all that 8 gig of ram very efficiently.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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Related Solutions

#4
November 20, 2013 at 20:18:56
If the hard drive is constantly running, usually it's due to
1. Virus or malware
2. Bad/unreadable sectors on your hard drive
Windows gets really fussy when it can't read data on your hard drive and will search forever to read the data.

I would start with going to the drive manufactures website and downloading their diagnostic tools for the drive.
It would also be a good idea to download some antivirus tools to scan your drive. Malwarebytes is highly recommended by most techs in here and I'm sure others in here can recommend good AV software tools.

message edited by THX 1138


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#5
November 21, 2013 at 09:32:20
Many thanks for all the answers guys,

Please note the following:
1. I have a Dell Studio XPS 1340 laptop
2. My hard drive is a 300GB Ricoh SD/MMC, with 183GB used
3. My antivirus / malware protection is the latest Norton Internet Security

So, I guess my next step is to try getting manufacturer diagnostic tools and see if I’m losing my drive :-((

Any suggestion on a better place to get drive diag tools will be greatly appreciated.


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#6
November 21, 2013 at 11:00:56
✔ Best Answer
Run MalwareBytes freebie on it just to see what it finds and fixes. Green icon top right here:
http://www.filehippo.com/download_m...

It often finds and fixes what AV's can miss.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
November 21, 2013 at 15:43:53
Derek,
Per your recommendation, I installed the free version and run 2 scans (quick and full) and nothing was found.
BTW, as these sort of softwares "love" to collect all your info, should I now uninstall it, like I've done with Spybot?
Thanks again for your continuous assistance,
Giddon.

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#8
November 21, 2013 at 16:13:44
"should I now uninstall it, like I've done with Spybot?"
If you wish, although it could be useful if you run into any problems. I should have said that the quick scan is usually quite good enough and it probably means that Malware is not your issue. It's years since I used SpyBot so I don't know how it has changed but MalwareBytes collects no information. Bogus scanners found on the net can do this sort of thing and are best avoided.

If I'm reading you correctly your issue is continuous activity from the hard drive. This often means that some program (or programs) is keeping it going but probably not Malware. Task manager (Ctrl-Alt-Del keys) should pinpoint what is causing most activity, although there are other programs that give more information.

It could be that some unnecessary programs are starting. If you type msconfig in the search then go to the Startup tab you might find some that you don't need (Google will usually tell you what any are that you don't recognise).

I would suggest you run chkdsk which can fix minor HD issues:
http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/6...

If that doesn't help then Seagate's SeaTools is an example of a program that can fully check your drive out. Get the download for Windows from here:
http://www.seagate.com/gb/en/suppor...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#9
November 22, 2013 at 01:06:27
I'm still curious, when you get the 'hard drive full' message do you check to see how much is actually used?

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#10
November 22, 2013 at 09:08:59
He never said his hard drive was full.

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#11
November 22, 2013 at 10:06:13
Many thanks Friends,

Please let me try answering all your comments:
1. First and most thankful to Derek for all of his suggestions, especially to install a malware package (which I now run on "Pro" mode)
2. I also downloaded Dell System Detect and run their PC diag in a full check (drive, memory, video, etc.) and they all passed
3. I then used the Defragger by Piriform to correct whatever it found
4. I then modified my indexing scheme to eliminate unnecessary indexes
5. Seems like the drive is now much “quitter”, somewhere around the 30% mark

Many thanks for all you folks for great help.
Have a great weekend and happy Thanksgiving.
Giddon,
Stamford CT


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#12
November 22, 2013 at 12:42:25
Not too sure exactly which activity (or maybe several) fixed the issue but I'm glad to hear it and thanks for popping back to let us know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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