Graphics card not booting

June 9, 2015 at 12:48:47
Specs: Windows 7
I turned my pc off in the normal way, When i booted it back up the following day my graphics card fan runs but no longer boots my screen up, i took the pci card out and then used the onboard graphics which works perfectly, Any ideas what might of gone on? Short circuit possibly???

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#1
June 9, 2015 at 13:19:48
Sounds like the pci card has failed. Take it out, clean the edge connectors with a soft pencil eraser then pop it in and out of the socket a few times (to clear any oxide off the socket itself) before pushing it firmly back.

See if that helps - you might be lucky.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
June 9, 2015 at 13:33:03
will give that a try thanks :)

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#3
June 9, 2015 at 13:43:07
Is it a PCI card or a PCI-express card? Make/model would be helpful. How long have you had it? If it's a gaming card, the problem might be due to an underpowered power supply.

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#4
June 9, 2015 at 13:50:39
Derek nope it didnt work,

Riider i have had it some years with no problems and nothing to do with power supply. Its a pci-e card.


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#5
June 9, 2015 at 14:11:20
I guess it could be a software glitch. You could try System Restore (type it in search) then choose a date before the problem came along. You won't lose your own files.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
June 9, 2015 at 14:14:01
doubtful though aint it, more likely its failed.

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#7
June 9, 2015 at 14:52:45
Yes, on balance, I agree that it points to the card itself, although there is a vague possibility that its software has screwed up. My feeling is that there is not much lost by doing System Restore and it that doesn't help then it's new card time.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
June 9, 2015 at 15:00:27
I cant really afford to replace the card i have as i got it of a friend on the cheap, its ddr3 256bit card cost a few quid to replace :(

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#9
June 9, 2015 at 16:32:49
Well, unless you are skilled at repairing faults on modern circuit boards then the chances of fixing it yourself are minimal. If a component has died you are unlikely to be able to obtain a replacement. Even if it is due to a poor connection then first you have to find which one, then you have to tackle trying to solder on a board which was produced by a machine using a solder bath. Even with a very small soldering iron you risk damaging something or bridging connections.

Video cards, however expensive, are intended to be throw away items.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
June 9, 2015 at 16:51:47
"its ddr3 256bit card"
"i have had it some years with no problems and nothing to do with power supply"

If it's an older card with 256-bit memory, it's probably a power hog. I'm still throwing the underpowered/overloaded power supply out there as a possibility. I'm not saying the PSU is bad, but it may have deteriorated to the point that it can no longer produce the necessary amount of power required by the card.

Make/model of both the card & PSU would be helpful.


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#11
June 10, 2015 at 00:04:11
The power supply is 750w like 6 months old more power if anything than needed. Thats why i am thinking its shorted out too much power going to the g card

message edited by azza2015


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#12
June 10, 2015 at 09:26:41
Why is it so difficult to post the make/model of the card & the PSU? And why did you withhold the fact that the PSU was recently replaced? And while we're on the topic, why was it replaced?

PSU wattage rating means very little. Some manufacturer's fudge the numbers. Does yours have a single +12v rail with high amperage or is it a multi +12v rail design? Does it have an 80 plus efficiency rating? Are the +3.3v & +5v rails limited to approx 25A each or are they rated considerably higher? Did you pay a good buck for your PSU? A decent 750W generally is not cheap. Price doesn't necessarily dictate quality, but there's usually a good reason why some sell for $25 & others for $100.

message edited by riider


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#13
June 10, 2015 at 09:43:51
am i a computer whiz kid no im not, how am i supposed to know everything about what information you want or needed,

it was replaced because the psu that came with the pc wasnt powerful enough to run the graphics card and other items i have in it.

Anyway im just going to see my mate when he comes back off holiday who is a computer engineer see if he can do anything or if it deffo needs replacing, I for one dont know alot about pc;s which is why i asked the question on here. My mate knows more as he builds them for businesses.

Derek i found your responses helpful thanks :)


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#14
June 10, 2015 at 13:42:20
And how are we supposed to know what you know or don't know? We can't help you if you don't respond to our follow-up questions. All it does is lead to frustration on both ends.

If you're capable, open the case & get the model numbers off the card & PSU. If that's too difficult, download Speccy so we'll at least know which graphics card you're dealing with.

https://www.piriform.com/speccy/builds


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#15
June 10, 2015 at 13:48:22
Its a sapphire x1900 xt

I didnt see you asking, i have been looking at these on my phone so a tiny screen, my appologies if i missed things.

message edited by azza2015


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#16
June 11, 2015 at 05:17:53
"Its a sapphire x1900 xt"

Almost 10 yrs old. It used to be a high end gaming card, now it's barely a match for low end cards. It's rated at over 100W so it would require 9-10A from the +12v rail. Do you have the 6-pin PCIe plug connected on the end of the card?

http://images.hardwarezone.com/uplo...


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#17
June 11, 2015 at 05:55:12
yes i did mate

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