Graphic Card Fan Noise and Changing it

Custom / CUSTOM
August 13, 2011 at 16:59:11
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate x64, 2.793 GHz / 2047 MB
Hi!

My Graphic Card started making noises and I removed it and took off the heat sink and fan and gave everything a good cleaning and I gave the fan some oil. The noise stopped and after 4 months it came back yesterday and I did the same and it stopped again. Now should I replace the graphic card fan or not. It is working and the noise has stopped. Also the Thermal Paste on the GPU when I removed it was rock hard and I have heard that it should be gooey to do its job so should I put new thermal paste on it. Will a normal low price thermal paste do the job?

Please respond.

Tek Ideas Unlimited


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#1
August 13, 2011 at 17:20:08
You should NOT have removed the heatsink, all you needed to do was remove the fan. There are different types of thermal material. Most manufacturers use a thermal pad which softens when the GPU heats up but hardens again when it cools. You destroyed the integrity of the pad when you removed the heatsink. All of the old material needs to be completely removed from both the heatsink & GPU, then a small dab of thermal paste applied to the GPU core. Any brand will do.

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#2
August 13, 2011 at 18:57:44
The fans on graphics cards often have cheap "oilite" sleeve bearings that have oil impregnated into the pores of the bearings. Eventually the interior hole of the bearing gets glazed and doesn't allow the impregnated oil to reach the shaft, then the bearings wear to the point that the bearings produce too much friction on the fan shaft, and you hear screeching or rattling noises, more likely to be noticed when the computer has sat for a while and has had a chance to cool down, when you then start up the computer, and after that the fan shaft often seizes in the bearings and the fan blade won't move, or at least, there's too much friction for the fan to start spinning.
Oiling the bearings may work temporarily, but they were not intended to be oiled, and the only lasting solution is to replace the fan.

Measure the diameter of the fan blade and the distance between the centers of the holes for the mounting pins or mounting screws in millimeters, or convert to millimeters.
If you live in a reasonably large place, there are probably local places that have lots of computer related parts that may have a replacement fan that will mount on the heatsink, though it may not look the same as the original one.
If not, you will probably be able to find such a fan you can buy on a web site.
E.g. manufacturers that make custom (aftermarket) or replacement cpu fans often also make custom or replacement graphics card fans.
If you can find one that has one ball bearing, one sleeve bearing, or better still two ball bearings or two ceramic bearings, the bearings will last longer. (If the description or the label says ball bearing without an s, it probably has one ball bearing, one sleeve bearing.)
The replacement fan should have the same cfm (cubic feet per minute) rating or better - if that's not stated, if it looks similar and has the same diameter and depth of fan blade, it should spin at close to the same max speed or faster (see the specs of the graphics card if you need to) and draw close to the same amount of current - ma - or more.
......

If you use thermal grease - pure silicon grease with no additives - whitish, translucent, nearly clear when in a thin layer - between the heat sink and the graphics chip (or cpu), it never hardens
.


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#3
August 14, 2011 at 07:32:30
Well I can't afford a new fan right now. I am getting one which is a bit expensive. I am located in Pakistan and you know how expensive it can get when getting computer equipment. So will just a thermal paste do for now and can I wait for a while with the fan. And how do I get the current thermal paste off the gpu and heatsink.

Tek Ideas Unlimited


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Related Solutions

#4
August 14, 2011 at 08:25:00
"I can't afford a new fan right now"

How much is a fan in your country? more than 450 rupees (approx $5 US)?


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#5
August 14, 2011 at 09:20:02
"And how do I get the current thermal paste off the gpu and heatsink"

Search the web using something such as remove hardened thermal paste, without quotes around the words.

e.g.
- for the stuff on the heat sink, boil some water and place the heat sink in it until the paste softens
- if that works, for the stuff on the graphics chip, breifly run your computer with the graphics card installed to soften the thermal paste
- avoid scratching the heat sink or cpu surface - use something made of wood or stiff plastic, or a soft cloth, or a cotton pad, or Q tips (cotton on the ends of a wooden stick)
- best choice - use isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol), the greater the percentage of alcohol in the mixture the better.
- use methyl alcohol (wood alcohol) but it won't work as well as isopropyl alcohol
- use acetone (a major ingredient in nail polish remover) or mineral spirits (paint thinner, turpentine) but make sure you wipe off all oily residue


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#6
August 14, 2011 at 15:20:17
The Fan costs around 15USD and I just bought a Samsung LED monitor. It cost me 12100 Rupees (140USD) and I had to borrow 50USD from a friend. I am done for the month and have to wait till next month untill I get my pay...

So that is why I was wondering that can I wait to get a replacement fan or should I get it now.

Tek Ideas Unlimited


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#7
August 14, 2011 at 17:21:33
Does your motherboard have onboard video ?

If yes, remove the AC power to the computer, unplug the card, and plug your monitor into the onboard video port. If you need to, install the specific drivers/software for the onboard video. When you get the fan, install the graphics card again.

If no, or in any case, you could leave the side panel off of the case and use whatever spare fan you have to blow on the graphics card, but the heat sink must be re-installed along with thermal paste or thermal grease.


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