Solved Getting photos from corrupted hard drive

Hewlett-packard Hp 15 notebook pc
September 6, 2015 at 14:10:26
Specs: Windows 8.1, Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU N2840 @ 2.16GHz
I finally had to replace the hard drive on my mother in laws laptop. It has a lot of bad sectors and will not run windows well at all. I replaced the drive. I had saved the photos the last time I had her computer, but I do not remember where I saved them to. I know that they are online, but I cannot remember where. I also am 99% positive that I put them back onto the hard drive before it crashed, and now I am running into the issue of trying to get them off, if they are there and able to be recovered. I have the old drive in another computer, trying to get it to boot to windows, but it is not working all that well.

What suggestions do you have? The original computer is an eMachines laptop, 3g ram....Not really sure what info more you may need. I have tried to use Hirem's Boot CD, and that didn't work. It did allow me to browse the drive (using minixp), but told me that I did not have administrator privileges to be able to open the pictures directory.

Any suggestions/help would be greatly appreciated!

OMG don't judge me!


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✔ Best Answer
September 8, 2015 at 12:37:39
"Usually" a CFH (Call For Help) is dealt with in the open forum; as that way "everyone" benefits from the input.

PM (Private Message) responses are not "usually" encouraged here?

I would suggest to leave the hard drive alone without trying any type of trial software or booting from recovery discs since the hard drive already has reallocation crc errors.

That the drive does have bad sectors may not prevent data access/recovery by various methods - all mentioned in the above responses. True it may not happily run windows but I have known one or two drives that wouldn't run the installed OS - a failing drive in each case; and yet data access/recovery was achieved in both cases via a simple usb connection approach (and not using recovery software).

Recovery software as advised in earlier responses here does "not" write to the drive; nor do they affect the drive in any physical manner.

Attaching the drive to another (working) computer via a usb adapter cable set (or in a usb enclosure) will not affect the drive in any way that will do further damage to it.

If the drive spins up OK (as mooted above) then access to it "ought" to be possible... If it won't spin up then there is at least one routine that may allow it albeit briefly (the freezer approach) - but long enough to allow data access/recovery by at least two methods. One is simply directly (reading it - "not" writing to it) - via usb from another host computer; the other via recovery software installed on a host computer which then access the drive via usb - as described in other responses above.

And on at least one occasion I found the "freezer" method of rescuing a failing drive to work "rather well" too. "All" critical data was recovered by simply attaching to a host system via usb. This drive had bad sectors - and also was "clicking at times too...!

message edited by trvlr



#1
September 6, 2015 at 15:27:34
Don't try to boot from the HDD, you may loose more data.
Do you have an external (USB) drive casing? Or put it in a desktop as slave drive.

I had good results recovering data from damaged drives with Recuva
https://www.piriform.com/recuva.

Select what you want to recover (pix?) at the start of the program. Depending on the size of the drive and data stored it may take hour(s) to scan the drive.


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#2
September 6, 2015 at 16:43:22
Along the lines of sluc... Connect the drive to working computer via a usb adapter or enclosure. If the drive spins up and thus appears in disk management (within windows) then you may be able access the drive contents etc. that way. Hopefully you won't need to run recuva (or similar) on the host computer in order to recover files from the usb connected drive,

Definitely do NOT write anything to the problem drive.

Presuming you manage to gain access to the files etc., copy them to dvd at least and veify the copies are ok. Then duplicate those dvds, and keep safe. Never really wise to leave photos etc. on a hard drive only. Copying to dvd is a safer storage medium, although often useful (if possible) to have them on another external hard drive too. Thus one hss two different storage media protecting those precious photos etc.

Anf then there are free versions of cloud storage too. But don't rely on that/those as sole/safe storage either; again have dvd copies too.


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#3
September 6, 2015 at 19:55:44
Here's some additional file recovery software that worked for someone with a similar problem:

http://www.z-a-recovery.com/downloa...

As already mentioned, the problem drive should be set up as an external or secondary drive and not have anything written to it.


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Related Solutions

#4
September 8, 2015 at 06:48:33
I would suggest to leave the hard drive alone without trying any type of trial software or booting from recovery discs since the hard drive already has reallocation crc errors.

If you are interested in data recovery, please e-mail me at datarecoveryparts@gmail.com There are different approaches that can be taken to recover the data from your hard drive using proper equipment.

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#5
September 8, 2015 at 12:37:39
✔ Best Answer
"Usually" a CFH (Call For Help) is dealt with in the open forum; as that way "everyone" benefits from the input.

PM (Private Message) responses are not "usually" encouraged here?

I would suggest to leave the hard drive alone without trying any type of trial software or booting from recovery discs since the hard drive already has reallocation crc errors.

That the drive does have bad sectors may not prevent data access/recovery by various methods - all mentioned in the above responses. True it may not happily run windows but I have known one or two drives that wouldn't run the installed OS - a failing drive in each case; and yet data access/recovery was achieved in both cases via a simple usb connection approach (and not using recovery software).

Recovery software as advised in earlier responses here does "not" write to the drive; nor do they affect the drive in any physical manner.

Attaching the drive to another (working) computer via a usb adapter cable set (or in a usb enclosure) will not affect the drive in any way that will do further damage to it.

If the drive spins up OK (as mooted above) then access to it "ought" to be possible... If it won't spin up then there is at least one routine that may allow it albeit briefly (the freezer approach) - but long enough to allow data access/recovery by at least two methods. One is simply directly (reading it - "not" writing to it) - via usb from another host computer; the other via recovery software installed on a host computer which then access the drive via usb - as described in other responses above.

And on at least one occasion I found the "freezer" method of rescuing a failing drive to work "rather well" too. "All" critical data was recovered by simply attaching to a host system via usb. This drive had bad sectors - and also was "clicking at times too...!

message edited by trvlr


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#6
September 10, 2015 at 11:43:45
Purchase a USB to SATA or IDE Hard Drive adapter kit. Connect the adapter to the hard drive, and the usb end to your usb port. If the hard drive is not physically damaged, it will spin up, and in windows explorer, you will see it as another drive. Just search that drive for the files you are looking for, or copy them to another location. Usually these adapter kits also have connections for laptop hard drives. Also, some hard drives require a power supply, and the adapter kit comes with a power cable to plug in from the outlet (120v) to the power connection on the hard drive. This is much better than recovery software.

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#7
September 10, 2015 at 12:28:02
If the drive in question is SATA then this adapter will work fine (to connect the drive to any computer via sub).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...

I have one of these,and as long as you connect it drivectly via its rather short cable it will work fine. Many of these adapters (which draw power from the usb port - not via an additional power adapter) will not work if a long(er) usb extension cord is applied...

If you're in Canada/USA then likely the same (or similar) are available via Amazon.ca or Amazon.com

message edited by trvlr


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#8
October 16, 2015 at 17:52:36
Wow, I forgot I opened this thread. I ended up replacing the HDD, as we found the photos on dvds. Whew! Thanks for the help :)

OMG don't judge me!


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