Solved Fix RTC clock problem & Sound error

May 15, 2015 at 04:11:57
Specs: Windows 10 Tech Preview, 4gb Ram, Amd E1
recently, near Christmas of 2014, I had received a Toshiba Satellite C50d b 120, and...

Silly me for not reading the manual to notice that it already had a recovery partition, but this aside I had the intention of creating a recovery medium for my laptop via an external CD-Drive, laptop does not have an on board drive, nor didn't allow me to create a usb medium.

Furthermore, I had made the mistake of plugging my laptop power source into the input of the cd drive, Immediately upon contact my PC shut off, as if it was forced. So, yes, I shall subject it to an unexpected power surge.

Upon turning it on, it was asking for a Hdd password, this was irrelevant and remains irrelevant as I have changed hard drive with a previous hard drive I have owned.

Upon changing hard drive, this has allowed me to get to boot and Bios, post ect.
I get reminded that RTC battery is low when I leave my laptop off Ac for a day, as if It can hold a charge but not for long.
Which I know these are small, but I expect them to hold enough to last longer than a day.
If I recall the same battery type is used in Gameboy cartridges, and can last for five years if I remember.

Anyway, upon any sound expecting to come out of the speakers, even at POST, it sounds crackled, which drops in and out of crackling and silence.
Earphone port is affected with this. But not as bad, it can act as if it has not been affected at times, playing sounds and music perfectly, but over time, it progressively deteriorates in volume. And the crackling becomes more prominent as time passes.

HDMI is not affected in any way. Problem is recurring no matter what operating system I use.

I can live with the problems, I do like perfection so it just momentarily irritates me to experiences these problems. Just happy that my laptop is somewhat in a great working state, but would be ecstatic if these two were corrected and would love some tips.

I somehow think these two problems are related, as if RTC battery is causing sound problems.


See More: Fix RTC clock problem & Sound error

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✔ Best Answer
May 15, 2015 at 09:48:19
My volume suggestion was to get a handle on whether it was some sort of overload - seems like it wasn't.

By module I mean the sound chip itself. This fits with riider's suggestion that you zapped the board and it messed up the chip. Not much more I can say.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
May 15, 2015 at 06:22:29
Hard to see how the CMOS battery (RTC battery) relates in any way to sound issues. If that gives trouble the symptoms are usually that the computer clock loses time or that BIOS fails to keep its settings.

Poor sound can be due to a various things but the sound module itself is a likely culprit. You could always update the sound drivers but somehow the symptoms don't really fit. It doesn't appear to be a common symptom on that model. Try dropping the volume level to see if that makes any difference.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
May 15, 2015 at 06:25:07
Connecting the power to the external CD drive port most likely caused some damage. The RTC (Real Time Clock) battery has nothing to do with audio.

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#3
May 15, 2015 at 07:26:04
@Riidler, do you believe it irreversible or reversible?
I'm a novice so I've no idea where to start, hardware wise,

@Derek I have tried updating the Sound Driver, if by Module is what you mean. I'd like to be on the same page as you. I always use the drivers from the manufacturers website, I don't use those "driver updaters".

In the past I have dropped the volume a few times, enough to remember.
When I drop the volume:
GREEN BAR = ACTIVE VOLUME
GREY BAR = POTENTIAL VOLUME?

On board speakers: The volume will just crackle/static, and lowering the volume will lower the volume of the crackling, but will not make it less frequent, just lowers the dB(Decibel) of it. And is always like this, not random.

Earphone port: The audio may or may not act as intended, or may return to 'crackling'.
When it returns to crackling, it will have the occasional crackling when the problem starts, and over time, despite what volume it is at, will deteriorate in quality and crackling will become more prominent. The volume will lower automatically following this, and I have noticed on the sound BAR hud, the grey bar is always the same if volume is 100%, and green bar(Active sound if I recall) will be lower than the grey(Remember that I said that when the sound deteriorates the volume decreases), if I lower it as it is deteriorating the crackling is less frequent until it gets worse.

I assume if I left the sound running for about an hour, the volume will be insanely low and the crackling will be common.

I gave no programs any permissions to lower the volume.

And also noticed that, when I do the L & R speaker test, it will hang for several seconds until the sound has completed(In this case, crackles).


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#4
May 15, 2015 at 09:48:19
✔ Best Answer
My volume suggestion was to get a handle on whether it was some sort of overload - seems like it wasn't.

By module I mean the sound chip itself. This fits with riider's suggestion that you zapped the board and it messed up the chip. Not much more I can say.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
May 15, 2015 at 20:10:49
About the cmos battery; it's not rechargeable so it doesn't hold a charge. The capacitors in the cmos circuitry can hold a charge for awhile but that's not really their function. You should consult the manual or a Toshiba help site for info on changing the battery. Some like their C855 series are easy to get to. With others you practically have to take apart the entire laptop to get to it.

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#6
May 16, 2015 at 10:03:04
Actually I think CMOS batteries are rechargeable but "only to an extent". I experimented with charging that "type" of battery once but batteries that would normally run for about a year without charge only lasted a few months - I was careful to get the charge rate right.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
May 16, 2015 at 22:36:31
I don't think the cr2032 batteries are supposed to be recharged but then back in the days when portable radios were called 'transistor' radios and used 9 volt batteries I used to recharge the carbon batteries I powered my radio with. And they weren't supposed to be recharged either. And of course the charged battery wouldn't work nearly as long as a new one.

I did notice there's a rechargeable replacement for the cr2032--the LIR2032. They're 3.6 volt like the rechargeable ones that a lot of the 486 motherboards came with but are made to replace the cr2032. Unfortunately to charge it you have to remove the battery:

https://www.tindie.com/products/bob...

which is going to be a problem in a laptop where you may be spending hours just trying to get to the thing.


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#8
May 17, 2015 at 08:45:41
Interesting gadget. Maybe the ordinary CR2032's just refresh a little from the applied voltage when in the computer. They seem to last for years, which even lightly loaded surprises me. That's why I suspect there is a "little something" going on but not intended as rechargeable in the generally accepted way.

The batteries I was playing about with in the past were watch batteries. After charge you would get about 3 months even though they were dead when first removed. Not worth the hassle these days as they are so cheap online. Possible explosion risk too if you overdid it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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