Solved Finding the MAC Address of a computer

Toshiba / Satellite a100
September 13, 2014 at 12:21:21
Specs: Windows XP, x86 1995 MHz
I know every hardware has a MAC address. how to find out that address of a computer or a cell phone or any other network device?

See More: Finding the MAC Address of a computer

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✔ Best Answer
September 14, 2014 at 09:41:19
My router shows the device MAC address along with whatever "name" the device has been given. For example it shows "wills iphone", "Brett's iphone", "wills tablet" and so on. There's a mix of Windows, Apple and Android operating systems.

However if you have physical access to all of the devices on your network and don't mind drilling through their settings to find out their MAC addresses it's not too difficult to find.

Iphone IOS 7.1.2: Tap on the "Settings" icon > "General" > "About" scroll towards the bottom of the screen and you will see "Wi-Fi Address" and it will look something like: A1:B2:CD:E3:F4:56. A mixture of 6 pairs of numerals and/or letters.

Android 4.2.2: Tap on the "Settings" icon > "About Device" > "Status" and the information is at Wi-Fi MAC address.

For Windows PC's you can open a command window by holding the Windows key + R key. When the run window opens type in
cmd.exe
When the command window opens type in
ipconfig /all
(take note there is a space between ipconfig and /all). The MAC address is listed next to each "physical address". It's up to you to determine which network adaptor is being used to connect to your network.

message edited by btk1w1



#1
September 13, 2014 at 13:05:49
Every hardware does not have a MAC address. The only hardware that does is network hardware like Network Interface card, Wi-fi, adaptors, routers and modems. The computer itself does not have a MAC address.

To find the MAC address of the particular hardware look in the configuration of the particular hardware you are interested in. Where you find it varies on the type of device you are interested in.

Stuart


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#2
September 13, 2014 at 14:17:43
If you want to find the MAC address of all devices on the LAN, you can use the nmap scanner.

For example, if your network address is 192.168.0.0 the nmap command would be:
nmap -sP 192.168.0.0/24


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#3
September 14, 2014 at 01:07:04
If you have a router, all IP addresses and associated MAC address can be seen in the router configuration webpage. Usually the "status" overview.

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Related Solutions

#4
September 14, 2014 at 08:55:08
I am not sure how to look in configuration of a computer or a smart phone!

The problem is not in scanning my network to find out. I already have a program called network magic which gives those MAC addresses but it doesnt tell me WHICH device has which address. I need to know which address belongs to the computer A and which one belongs to computer B and to smart phone A and B etc. Does that nMap do that??

I think the router configuration wont show that either


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#5
September 14, 2014 at 09:20:57
For a given computer - from a command prompt) you can run this command

ipconfig /all

Obviously press Enter/Return after typing the above.

It will produce a dos style screen listing the details of all network device installed in the computer.

Start\run - and then type the above command. Note the space before /all.

Phones will invariably have MAC details within the setup area; depending on the make./model of phone depends where it is is and how to find it. What make/model phone(s) are involved here?

Some other kit often has the MAC info on a sticker on the base or similar... Often in "very"small characters too.. Just to make it really easy to find and read..!


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#6
September 14, 2014 at 09:29:57
If the hostname can be resolved then nmap will return it. However, it does not show the MAC of the host that is running the command.

Here's the output from scanning my network. Note that I'm passing the output to a perl command to filter/reformat the data. The nmap command has several different formatting options which you can read about in its documentation.

D:\test>nmap -sP 192.168.0.0/24 | perl -pe "s/\n/ / if /^Host/; chomp if /^Nmap scan/"

Starting Nmap 5.21 ( nmap.org ) at 2014-09-14 09:18 Pacific Daylight Time
Nmap scan report for dslrouter.westell.com (192.168.0.1)Host is up (0.0010s latency). MAC Address: 00:23:97:A5:94:2C (Westell Technologies)
Nmap scan report for 192.168.0.2Host is up (0.0020s latency). MAC Address: C0:3F:0E:D4:63:B8 (Unknown)
Nmap scan report for fishmonger.westell.com (192.168.0.22)Host is up. Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (3 hosts up) scanned in 16.73 seconds


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#7
September 14, 2014 at 09:30:19
I am puzzled as to why you need to know a particular MAC address. The MAC address is part of the Ethernet protocol and only Ethernet uses it.

In all the years i have been using networked computers the only time I have ever needed to know the the MAC address of anything is when setting up network security on Wi-fi. In all other instances it is just there and it has worked.

Stuart

message edited by StuartS


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#8
September 14, 2014 at 09:41:19
✔ Best Answer
My router shows the device MAC address along with whatever "name" the device has been given. For example it shows "wills iphone", "Brett's iphone", "wills tablet" and so on. There's a mix of Windows, Apple and Android operating systems.

However if you have physical access to all of the devices on your network and don't mind drilling through their settings to find out their MAC addresses it's not too difficult to find.

Iphone IOS 7.1.2: Tap on the "Settings" icon > "General" > "About" scroll towards the bottom of the screen and you will see "Wi-Fi Address" and it will look something like: A1:B2:CD:E3:F4:56. A mixture of 6 pairs of numerals and/or letters.

Android 4.2.2: Tap on the "Settings" icon > "About Device" > "Status" and the information is at Wi-Fi MAC address.

For Windows PC's you can open a command window by holding the Windows key + R key. When the run window opens type in
cmd.exe
When the command window opens type in
ipconfig /all
(take note there is a space between ipconfig and /all). The MAC address is listed next to each "physical address". It's up to you to determine which network adaptor is being used to connect to your network.

message edited by btk1w1


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#9
September 14, 2014 at 10:15:10
btk1w1 did the best job. It was necessary to type cmd.exe first because typing ipconfig /all from the beginning produced a window that disappeared immediately and didnt stop for me to read it. But with cmd.exe first the window stayed there. It gave all MAC addresses in the network with their names.

I use Samsung S4 phone and sure enough I found that info in the status--->wifi MAC address.

My linksys router also showed all addresses and their names under Status like sluc said

As for Stuart's question, the reason is also security. Network magic shows how many devices are connected to my network. When I identify all my devices I make sure there are no intruders in that network. I think it is better to answer the questions on this forum instead of asking whey they are asked....


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#10
September 14, 2014 at 10:32:50
I think it is better to answer the questions on this forum instead of asking whey they are asked....

You do do you. When you have been answering questions on this forum as long as I have to will come to realise that asking why someone wants to do something will often reveal a lack understanding on the problem and consequently is asking the wrong question.

I questions were only answered as asked there would be a lot of misleading answers that solve nothing.

Stuart

message edited by StuartS


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#11
September 14, 2014 at 10:39:53
Now it is clear.

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#12
September 14, 2014 at 13:16:51
Sorry about the mislead in my post above. I edited it before posting and somehow dropped out the essential type cmd info for the start\run section. That of command "cmd" of course opens up the "dos style" - command prompt window...; which is where, as "bkt1w1" correctly posted, is the ipcong /all goes...

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