Faulty Hard Drive PCB?

Wd Western digital scorpio blue 250gb in...
September 8, 2009 at 03:14:44
Specs: Macintosh OS X 10.6
A friend had asked me to look at her portable hard drive, she dropped it but it was not in use at the time.

I have it here and have plugged it into the motherboard, the BIOS shows a blank name next to where the model name should be and it also beeps when it stars up (Sound clip.mp3), I have also tried putting it in a sata caddy and plugging it into my mac, it shows it as a 2.2tb drive finds the serial number as 202020202020 and says it's not S.M.A.R.T compatible.
I have a feeling she has broken the PCB is this correct?

The hard drive is a Western Digital Scorpio 250gb WD2500BEVS-11VAT0
I have found a replacement PCB on ebay http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI....
The number on the white sticker is slightly different on hers: 2061-701499-500 as apposed to the 2061-701449-600 on the ebay listing, but the number on the actual PCB is the same,2060-701499-000 REV A.
Would this PCB be compatible?



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#1
September 8, 2009 at 03:28:58
It is unlikely to be compatible, Normally when doing this kind of thing the PCB had to be identical right down to revision level. It might work, but there is a very good chance it wont.

Besides, if the hard disk was dropped there is a chance the head mechanism has been damaged and there is no recovery from that without spending a lot of money.

BTW, dint even think of omening the case to get at the disks inside. That will guarantee to make the drive unless. That sort of thing is best left to the experts if the data on disk is sufficiently important to warrant spend a couple of thousands dollars on recovery.

Stuart


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#2
September 8, 2009 at 10:22:26
I'll second Stuart's comments. And maybe you should tactfully suggest to your friend that backing up her valuable data is a good idea.

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#3
September 8, 2009 at 10:55:02
The fact that the drive is even seen at all suggests there MIGHT be a possibility of some file recovery.

Connecting to a Mac is not the ideal method because the mac may not be able to work with the file system on that drive.

Best to connect internally to a compatible PC. If that is not possible at least connect the enclosure you are currently using to a PC and use either a live version of Linux or a file recovery program to attempt reading and copying any files.

Knoppix is a live version capable of working with NTFS file system or FAT32. Get Knoppix at the link below. There are many versions and languages available on that link. Get the one that match the parameters below. Also below are links to file recovery software.

Knoppix_V5.1.1CD-2007-01-04-EN.iso
04-Jan-2007 00:58 696M

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knop...

PC Inspector (freeware)
http://www.snapfiles.com/get/pcinsp...
Zero assumption Recovery
http://www.z-a-recovery.com
The demo is limited
It will only recover 'up to' four folders per run
But you can make multiple runs
IMO the best, but not free
GetDataBack
http://www.runtime.org/


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Related Solutions

#4
September 8, 2009 at 11:13:48
If there is no data on the drive that is irreplacable, don't even bother with trying to fix it. She should buy another drive.

"...portable drive..."
The external enclesure may be damaged as well.

Apparently this is a 2.5" hard drive. They're not anywhere near as tough as a 3.5" drive, everything inside them is considerably smaller than in a 3.5" drive, and it's a lot more likely something inside it is damaged physically, perhaps even the disk(s) (platter(s) inside the drive.

"BTW, dint even think of omening the case to get at the disks inside. That will guarantee to make the drive unless"

unless should have been useless?

It's not that it's impossible - it's that most people are not careful enough to do it the right way and don't have the proper tools..

You can remove and transfer the disk(s) (platter(s)) inside the drive to another drive the disk(s) is/are physically compatible with, but it's not a job for an amatuer unless you're an extremely careful person.
You would probably require oddball tool tips to remove the oddball fasteners, and you would have to be able to hold the disk(s) without damaging it/them so it/they can't move when you're trying to break loose or final tighten the fasteners that hold down the disk(s).

You would need a drive that both the disk(s) (platter(s)) are physically compatible with, and that has a logic board that will work with the data as it is on them.
Your best chances of the disk(s) (platter(s)) working in another drive is if you install them in a new or used working drive that has exactly the same model number.


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#5
September 8, 2009 at 11:22:57
Looks like a dead end then for buying a new PCB, though I will still try and find one exactly the same.
She now realises she should have been backing up her files, all her photos from the last 6 years are on the drive and is very upset about it.

I have tried plugging it into a windows computer, Disk Management cannot find the drive, but GetDataBack does find it, but again it finds it as a 2tb drive.

Also if I try to boot the windows computer with the drive connected with either the caddy or a sata conection on the motherboard it will halt the post screen for about 30secs and then causes the computer to reboot once it tries to start windows.


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#6
September 8, 2009 at 11:28:55
I have tried replacing the caddy so that is not the problem. The WD diag tool show doesn't show the model number, serial number or capacity.

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#7
September 8, 2009 at 11:36:45
unless should have been useless?

It's not that it's impossible - it's that most people are not careful enough to do it the right way and don't have the proper tools..

It should have been useless. Physically it is not difficult, but hard drives are assembled in a clean room. That is a room clear of even the finest dust particles. In a domestic environment there is always going to be dust particles in the air. A particle of dust 5 microns wide can cause a hard disk to fail.

Stuart


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#8
September 8, 2009 at 12:06:02
I have tried replacing the caddy so that is not the problem. The WD diag tool show doesn't show the model number, serial number or capacity.
Here is the report log:

Test Option: EXTENDED TEST
Model Number:
Unit Serial Number:
Firmware Number:
Capacity: 0.00 GB
SMART Status: Not Available
Test Result: FAIL
Test Error Code: 11-Cable Test::Read diagnostics sector error!
Test Time: 20:02:08, September 08, 2009

Test Option: QUICK TEST
Model Number:
Unit Serial Number:
Firmware Number:
Capacity: 0.00 GB
SMART Status: Not Available
Test Result: FAIL
Test Error Code: 11-Cable Test::Could not open SMART or port driver on drive 2!
Test Time: 20:02:14, September 08, 2009


My friend has a mac not a pc, so it could have been formatted with HFS+, but I would have thought it would have been formatted however the drive originally came.


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#9
September 8, 2009 at 12:23:58
Well, if the original computer the external was used on read the drive then you should be able to.

Going back to your original query I agree swapping out the PCB is a crapshoot at best. If you don't see any physical damage to the PCB then what makes you think it is the problem? More likely the heads or platters, I would think.

Usually when the PCB gets zapped by a power surge the drive isn't identified at all. That is why I responded as I did. Had you mentioned the original computer was also a Mac I wouldn't have responded the same.


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#10
September 8, 2009 at 16:18:40
"Physically it is not difficult, but hard drives are assembled in a clean room. That is a room clear of even the finest dust particles. In a domestic environment there is always going to be dust particles in the air. A particle of dust 5 microns wide can cause a hard disk to fail."

If one is careful in a normal environment, and blows out the inside of the drive just before replacing the cover, all modern hard drives have internal pockets or traps that are designed to trap tiny amounts of dust and if the capacity of that is not exceeded, the drive will not be damaged. For that matter, the hard drive will certainly work for long enough, if nothing else is wrong, for you be able to get the data off of it.
Scott Mueller, the guy who wrote the "Upgrading and Repairing PCs" series, states in at least some of those that he has been running hard drives for many years with the cover removed to show people what it looks like inside when it's running when he gives lectures and none of them had failed or lost data.


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