fans spin for a sec processor or motherboard fault

September 3, 2012 at 04:47:54
Specs: Windows 7
Hi,
my computer suddenly gave a blue screen and then when i try to power it up just fan spins for a sec. so i thought of faulty power supply so i measured it with multimeter its fine. so i turned my head to be the motherboard or processor fault. so i unplugged the ATX power of the processor and the motherboard power is running and all fans keep running. so either its the processor or the condensers that supply power to the processor.
Thanks,

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#1
September 3, 2012 at 05:35:33
If you remove the memory do you get BIOS Beeps when switched on ?

ARM Devices are the future, great British Design !


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#2
September 3, 2012 at 05:42:45
no i does not get any sounds because it just gets on for a second and i got another cpu and the same happens i think its one of the condensers of the motherboard.

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#3
September 3, 2012 at 06:26:26
You didn't list any specs or any info about the PSU so any responses you get will be only be guesses.

"i thought of faulty power supply so i measured it with multimeter its fine"

All you did was measure voltages, it doesn't mean that the PSU is capable of delivering the required amperages.


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#4
September 3, 2012 at 06:33:28
yeah only measured voltage because it was already working before for 4 years so it fits the requirements. and i dont know how to measure something else. the PSU is 230v/6A 530 W with max load 36A all i know. also at my knowledge if the voltage is good then the amp is good as well.

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#5
September 3, 2012 at 08:21:10
"at my knowledge if the voltage is good then the amp is good as well"

If your PSU is only capable of delivering 12V @ 2A (due to some sort of internal failure) & your system needs at least 12V @ 20A, the system will not boot. Using a mutimeter will show the voltage to be within spec. Unfortunately, there is no simple home method for checking amperage & the test equipment costs thousands of dollars. I'm not 100% sure the PSU is the problem, but that's what I'd be looking into if it was my system. Of course, if it was my system, I would have posted the complete system & PSU specs to make it easier for people to help, but that's just me.


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