external HDD that can run NTFS

March 10, 2011 at 08:13:47
Specs: Windows 7
Having problems with old Win 95 graphics progs that ran OK on XP but won't on 7. Tried HD partition ORACLE and Virtual progs but they don't do it. Could an NTFS external drive do it?

See More: external HDD that can run NTFS

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#1
March 10, 2011 at 08:56:14
You can format an external drive with NTFS but I highly doubt this would solve your problem. Have you tried compatibility mode or running the application under VirtualPC or VirtualBox?

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#2
March 10, 2011 at 10:33:32
They are probably meant to run on dos with a fat32 file system. Windows 7 does not support dos, you will need to do as larry says and find a virtual box.

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#3
March 10, 2011 at 10:52:41
If the programs ran under any version of WinXP then you should be able to get them to run in Windows 7 by installing them under a Windows Compatibility Mode.

Go to Control panel> action center. Choose Windows Program Compatibility Troubleshooter. Follow the onscreen prompts.


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#4
March 10, 2011 at 13:52:17
Then you did something wrong with the virtual machines. They do run Windows 95 exactly like a normal computer.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#5
March 11, 2011 at 07:26:15
Dear respondant
.Oh boy, did I ever. After Compatibility mode had finished thoroughly digesting the problem, Windows 7 decided the software was "incompatible".
As to the Virtual modes, I downloaded them from recognised sites that posted the answers back in 2009.
It seems that if you didn't buy the higher forms of 7 (Professional, etc.) and have some sort of hyper software, it just doesn't work.
I also tried partitioning C: to load XP. Looked great, but it relies on the main operating system to open progs which have to sit in C: instead of Program Files 86.
I really have tried it all with software. For the record, I may have to retrograde and hook up my old XP machine using a keyboard/video/mouse sharing hardware. £44 is cheaper than $300-400 for a new COREL suite.
Thanks for the info

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#6
March 11, 2011 at 07:27:44
Dear J
I did everything with VM, but there were hyper progs needed.

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#7
March 11, 2011 at 08:25:44
So then can I assume you are using a laptop?

Is your version of Windows 7 the 64 bit version?


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#8
March 12, 2011 at 07:19:47
Tried it, just ended up with Windows saying the program wouldn't work.
The trouble is, COREL 6 needs to be directly under C:, not Program Files (I tried that in varous connotations). Thanks anyway.

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#9
March 12, 2011 at 07:21:57
No, a regular desktop pc. As I don't go about much I don't need portable h/w.

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#10
March 12, 2011 at 08:10:28
Just to clarify, did you have Corel Draw 6 running in WinXP?

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#11
March 13, 2011 at 09:38:34
Yes. My other pc has XP professional on it and COREL 6 works perfectly (apart from occasional memory problems which are inherent in PHOTOPAINT). The old pc in my Office has XP HE, and there were no problems. I always filled the compat boxes as to "95".
What bugs me is: although I have MS Office 2000, I still used the 95 version. It works perfectly, under C: in Win 7. I suppose there are more demands from a graphics package. I noticed a message when Photopaint jammed: something about a printer driver.
Thanks for your interest.

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#12
March 13, 2011 at 09:56:58
If Corel 6 ran under WinXP then you should be able to get it running under Windows 7 in a compatibility mode.

How did Corel 6 come to be running on WinXP? Was XP an in place upgrade from an older version of Windows?

I am currently running Office 2000 in WIndows 7 Ultimate 32 bit with no issues.

I have Corel 5 on floppies and tried to force install it. No go if selecting to install under program files. I wasn't gutsy enough to try installing to the root directory of C.

If you try that just be sure you create a restore point in Windows 7 BEFORE installing so you can back out if things go bad.

Should you decide to try this you install under the root directory and then without rebooting, use the Windows Program Compatibility Troubleshooter. I suggest trying a Win 95 or 98 compatibility mode.

Windows 7 is very forgiving.


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#13
March 14, 2011 at 08:42:41
WIN XP was new with a new pc in 2006.
I think I covered Compatibility in my previous explanations.
Like MS Office, COREL insists on being in the Root Directory. If one installs it in Program Files, it's all over the place. If it gets put into a dir of its own therein, it doesn't work at all. Some Registry files are missing.
Believe me, I have tried every connotation of installation and use available to me. Windows 7 says it is incompatible - last advice was to talk to the s/w mf. I guess being a cheapskate is based on lack of funds.
Thanks for the info.

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#14
March 14, 2011 at 09:42:32
I have successfully gotten supposed incompatible hardware and software working on Windows 7 using the compatibility mode.

Did you try installing it to the root directory? As I warned above, be sure to have a restore point in place. After installing to the root directory, run the troubleshooter BEFORE trying to run Corel.

You could also consider a dual boot with XP & 7.


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#15
March 15, 2011 at 08:52:29
Your first para: Win 7 definitely doesn't like this installation, anywhere. And, as before stated, COREL wants to be in C:.
And, I tried all the Compatibility issues: tapped on the .exe files and ran them through the procedures. Draw and PHPt started in every case, but that was it. Any call on the Disk and wham! had to Log Off to get out of the jam.
Dual Boot... Thanks I'll try it. I recall, in my salad days, there was an NTFS procedure that did this, but only our engineers could do it.

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#16
March 15, 2011 at 09:55:31
NTFS has nothing to do with it. You need to have another partition or hard drive and then install WinXP to it.

If your computer is not to old you could install a second hard drive and use an option in the BIOS to select which hard drive to boot from. The advantage to that setup is that it is totally isolated from your current operating system. Normally when using the Windows boot option if either OS has problems you may not be able to boot to either without a repair.

I boot that way to a separate physical hard drive that was installed in this computer before upgrading to Windows 7. I installed Windows 7 on a new SATA hard drive.

Windows 7 does have some basic partitioning features which may allow you to create another partition from the existing space.

If this is a pre-assembled name brand computer with Windows pre-installed creating additional partitions may disable the restore functions built into the system.


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#17
March 16, 2011 at 09:32:50
I am about to install some software to partition the disk [it is a new computer, with inset Win 7 HE 64 bit]. I'll get back to you with the results.
Thanks again.

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#18
March 21, 2011 at 10:29:53
Well, I did it! I gave ORACLE VirtualBox another try. This time, it recognized the CD/DVD drive, and installed COREL and MS Office 95. No usage problems. It recognizes usb devices such as printers, but won't see the external hard drive or the usb hub with its flash drives No big deal. At least I'm back in biz with my graphics.
Thanks for all your help - much appreciated.
PS, I looked inside my new pc and so much has changed as to how drives are hooked up. Anyway, there was no way it could accept my old hard disk.

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