Solved eMachines W3653 won't boot

May 4, 2012 at 10:45:00
Specs: Windows Vista
bios settings will not save on my emachine w3653...keeps trying to boot from cd and not hard drive

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#1
May 4, 2012 at 12:32:33
✔ Best Answer
The computer will NOT boot from a bootable Windows CD or DVD in an optical drive automatically UNLESS the bios detects no operating system is installed on the first hard drive the bios detects, or unless the bios isn't detecting the bootable hard drive at all.

The first hard drive the bios detects is not detected as bootable by the bios unless it has an operating system installed on it.

(SEE BELOW)


Did you select Save bios settings, press Y, press Enter, or similar, in the bios after you changed the settings ?

The Cmos battery may be too weak or dead or be installed upside down in it's socket, but default bios settings are always set to boot an operating system from the first hard drive the bios detects. However, the first hard drive it detects may NOT be bootable (see below).

If the Cmos battery is too weak or dead or is installed upside down in it's socket (the + on the top of it must be visible after it's been installed), then you will get a "Cmos Checksum Error" or similar message when you boot the computer, and the Date and Time in the bios will be set to default settings. You can change default settings in that situation, you should set at least the Date and Time, Save the settings, they will be retained as long as the computer is still running, but you will lose those settings after the computer has been shut off, at the very least after the AC power to the case has been removed and then restored.

If you're NOT getting a "Cmos Checksum Error" or similar message when you boot the computer, then the bios settings WERE saved, if you selected Save bios settings, pressed Y, pressed Enter, or similar, in the bios after you changed the settings.

If you DO get a "Cmos Checksum Error" or similar message when you boot the computer, you may need to replace the Cmos battery, and/or make sure the + on the top of it is visible after it's been installed.
"Button" cell batteries used in computers usually have enough voltage to retain custom bios settings including the Date and Time for three to five years or so.
....

Are you SURE your hard drive(s) is (are) being detected properly by the bios ? Does it (they) show up in the bios ?
If it (they) is (are) not being detected by the bios, you probably have something wrong with the data cable connection, or the jumper setting on the back of the drive(s) if it's an IDE drive.

The computer will NOT boot from a bootable Windows CD or DVD in an optical drive automatically UNLESS the bios detects no operating system is installed on the first hard drive the bios detects.
A new hard drive, or a used hard drive that has it's Windows installation deleted or that has no operating system installation on it, or a Windows installation on a hard drive that is NOT the first hard drive the bios detects, will NOT be detected as bootable.
If the first hard drive the bios detects is NOT detected as bootable, the bios will NOT try to boot from anything else.

Some other bootable CDs or DVDs, such as that came with a retail desktop mboard model, or an anti-malware CD or DVD, will load automatically regardless of whether the bios detects that the first hard drive it detects has a bootable partition.

If the bios detects a bootable partition on the first hard drive it detects, if the bios Boot order or similar settings have CD drive or similar listed before any hard drive, you will see a line "Press any key to boot from CD " or similar while booting the computer, and to boot from the Windows CD or DVD you must press a key while that line is on the screen. DO NOT press that key when Windows Setup restarts the computer during Setup, otherwise you'll be starting loading the CD or DVD from the beginning again.

The first hard drive the bios detects is not detected as bootable by the bios unless it has an operating system installed on it.

If you have more than one hard drive, if the first hard drive the bios detects is NOT detected as bootable, the bios may not be detecting the hard drive that IS bootable with default bios settings.
In that case, you need to....

- find the list of hard drives in the bios - the hard drive you want to load an operating system from must be listed first

- or - some bioses have more than one hard drive listed in the Boot Order or similar list - the hard drive you want to load an operating system from must be listed first

- or - you must change which data header the hard drive you want to load an operating system from is connected to on the mboard, and/or possibly how it's jumpered on the back of the hard drive if it's an IDE drive, so that the bios detects that hard drive first by default.


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#2
May 4, 2012 at 13:25:08
Thanks for the quick reply........I will check all the item you mentioned and give it a try....Thank You again!!!!

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#3
May 11, 2012 at 11:48:24
Did as you said and it worked..........Thank You so much for the Help!!

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#4
May 11, 2012 at 19:27:23
Thanks for the Thank yous.

We're glad to hear you solved your problem !

However, you haven't said what was wrong.

For whoever comes across this topic in the future's information, what was it that wasn't right ?


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#5
May 14, 2012 at 06:13:59
Going into BIOS and saving settings will do the job!
Thank You!

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