Do you know any good horizontal desktop cases?

Apple Ibook
August 31, 2014 at 08:02:51
Specs: None, None
Do you know any good horizontal desktop cases? They look better than standard towers IMO. I thought about buying this*, do you think it's a good case? And are there any disadvantages with using a Mic-ATX motherboard bar PCI expansion slots in terms of gaming? If not, do you have any reccomendations for a Micro-ATX AM3+ motherboard?

* = http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JHME4UY...

Compaq Armada 1700
Mobile Intel Pentium II @266MHz
160 MB RAM
Windows 2000
Chips & Technologies 65555
graphics
ES 1869 audio
Designed for Windows NT, Windows 95

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#1
August 31, 2014 at 08:26:29
That one on Amazon isn't designed to be used horizontally, it has to be stood vertically as shown.

It's got cooling vents on both sides but no stand-offs, so if you laid it flat (ie horizontal) the cooling vents would be blocked by the floor or desk it's sitting on. In that configuration overheating is guaranteed unless you screw or stick your own stand-offs in each of the four corners on the side that's going to be against the floor, still risky if the clearance isn't enough.

I also used to prefer horizontal cases to vertical ones, mainly because my first PC was a horizontal one (factory-built 20 years ago). However, since I started building & upgrading computers I quickly realised how much easier tower cases are to work on, easier drive-bays access especially, plus you can fit more drives in a tower case. There's just more workspace in them compared to horizontal type.

Not only that, horizontal cases are now getting as rare as hens teeth.

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#2
August 31, 2014 at 08:42:29
"It's got cooling vents on both sides but no stand-offs, so if you laid it flat (ie horizontal) the cooling vents would be blocked by the floor or desk it's sitting on. In that configuration overheating is guaranteed unless you screw or stick your own stand-offs in each of the four corners on the side that's going to be against the floor, still risky if the clearance isn't enough."

Thanks, I honestly didn't notice that. But, would it work to take an old Pentium 3 Packard Bell and removing all the parts, then mount new ones?

Compaq Armada 1700
Mobile Intel Pentium II @266MHz
160 MB RAM
Windows 2000
Chips & Technologies 65555
graphics
ES 1869 audio
Designed for Windows NT, Windows 95


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#3
August 31, 2014 at 12:03:05
"300W Standard TFX 12V Power Supply"

Try replacing that PSU with something decent - ain't gonna happen. I suggest you focus on cases that use a standard ATX PSU.

EDIT: this case can be used as either a desktop or a tower:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

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#4
August 31, 2014 at 13:43:37
You always contribute with useful information riider, thanks very much. I am thinking about using my old Pentium 3 Packard Bell case - is that a good idea? That way I can afford a good Corsair power supply, instead off some cheap-ass sh*t that comes with the case.

Compaq Armada 1700
Mobile Intel Pentium II @266MHz
160 MB RAM
Windows 2000
Chips & Technologies 65555
graphics
ES 1869 audio
Designed for Windows NT, Windows 95


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#5
August 31, 2014 at 21:30:24
Except for compaq and IBM most full size desktop cases will take a standard motherboard. I'm using an old HP Vectra case. The questionable area is around the CPU. On some the motherboard cpu bracket is bolted to the bottom of the case so whatever motherboard you put in would have to match up or you'd need to break off the mounting studs in the case so they don't short out the new one.

Don't forget to preorder your Hatch green chili for this fall. Many vendors ship world-wide.


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