Desktop shutting down

May 28, 2009 at 21:47:28
Specs: Windows XP, 2.7 celeron
Desktop was randomly shutting down. Diagnosed and was told my motherboard was bad. Replaced the motherboard, power supply and ram. Still having the same problem. If I boot into windows safe mode, the pc will run fine for days. If I boot into normal windows, the pc either locks up or shuts down then re-boots.

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#1
May 29, 2009 at 01:09:40
Hmm.. a corrupted window's components. Did you do the replacements your self?

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#2
May 29, 2009 at 06:39:42
Yes, I replaced all components myself.

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#3
May 29, 2009 at 07:08:51
Randomly replacing components to correct a problem is a crap shoot.

I doubt the motherboard was the problem in the first place. For what you spent you could have upgraded to faster hardware for about the same cash anyway.

If you just purchased those components I suggest you try to return them.

I assume you have a custom built computer?

Why did someone think the issue was the motherboard?

I suggest you restore the hardware back to original and troubleshoot from there. If you can run in safe mode without issue using the old hardware then IMO that would eliminate the motherboard and RAM as causes.

Do you have an add in graphics card?


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Related Solutions

#4
May 29, 2009 at 07:56:02
This WAS a cheapo Emachines. When I started having the problem, I had it diagnosed and was told the motherboard was bad. I replaced the motherboard and power supply. Still had the same problem and someone suggested the ram may be suspect. I then replaced the ram. Still the same problem. I brought it back to Best Buy (Geek Squad) and thier diagnostics pointed to the motherboard again. I seriously doubt that motherboard is or ever was bad. If it runs fine in safe mode, I too feel that it eliminates motherboard and ram possibilities. Is there a component of windows xp operating system when in normal mode that could cause this problem? I can always wipe the hard drive and do a fresh install.

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#5
May 29, 2009 at 08:36:07
eMachines are notorious for crappy power supplies. If you replaced it with an identical PSU then you may not have solved a problem with insufficient power.

Have you added additional hardware to the computer? Graphics cards are sometimes power hungry. When running in Safe Mode the Graphics card will only run in generic VGA mode so it will not use the dedicated drivers OR the same amount of power.

Did this problem manifest itself gradually, or all at once?


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#6
May 29, 2009 at 09:08:18
There is no graphics card installed. The problem pretty much showed up originally after about three years of trouble free use. The problem continued after the new motherboard and was installed. What I don't understand is why it will shut down in normal windows, but not in safe mode. The system is stripped of any peripheral hardware items. The only items connected are the mouse, keyboard, monitor and wirless adapter.

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#7
May 29, 2009 at 09:21:37
When you boot to safe mode a number of thing are different.

Many processes are not started in Safe mode. Many drivers are not loaded in Safe mode. Some hardware is not configured at all.

If you use Windows auto updater then you may have received an update or hardware driver that is causing the problems.

You can try to isolate by using selective startup. There are very few processes that need to run in order for Windows to boot. By unticking most processes and then adding them back in, one by one, you may be able to identify the issue.

Another thing you can do is look in Device manager while in Safemode and see if all hardware is working properly.

One other thing I can think of to try is to unplug the computer and reseat all cards, cables and RAM. RAM especially. Snap each stick in and out 4 or 5 times. If the problem persists run memtest86 from a boot disk to test the RAM.

The reason the RAM could be an issue in standard mode and not in safe mode is the memory ranges assigned to various programs and hardware may not be in use in safe mode.

What power supply did you install? Model number?


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#8
May 29, 2009 at 09:56:40
Thanks for your replies and insight. The power supply is a Logisys PS480D2. The ram is seated fully. There are no other add ins to check. This system is running bare bones. I will try the selective startup suggestion and see where that gets me.

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#9
May 29, 2009 at 12:00:32
I have disabled everything I can in the startup and services tabs of system configuration. All but three items (they were marked as essential) have been deselected. The system is running fine now. What do you think is the best way to proceed to identify the problem?

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#10
May 29, 2009 at 13:51:09
Add back one at a time and reboot. Make note of which one you added each time.

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#11
June 1, 2009 at 01:32:38
Next time make sure you bring the machine to more professionals and more qualified technicians. Take notes of the parts that you have changed to solve the trouble and remember how did you fix the problem. You'll grow on this thing and some you won't need to get it to technician to fix this kind of computer troubles.

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#12
June 1, 2009 at 02:03:43
randomly shutting down sounds like that's a Power Supply problem, as more peripherals more "Watts" will be required to
keep the whole system running

* USB accessory draws about 5 Watts per unit.
* Typical DVD ROM drive draws about 25 Watts per unit.
* Todays processors can draw up to 140Watts of power but
most idle lower than that.
* Modern graphics card (anything above a GeForce 6800) will
draw about 100 Watts
* The motherboard, CPU fan, Keyboard and mouse’ll draw
about 40Watts minimum.
* Hard drive’ll draw about 25 Watts each.
* Your standard 19" CRT monitor will use about 100Watts. An
LCD of the same size uses about 1/3 of that! That’s 33Watts.

Check the specs of your PSU

Does your PSU give you at least 60% of that???

best of luck


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#13
June 1, 2009 at 07:55:14
Below is a link to your PSU. The specs and price reflect an inferior unit. Although rated at 480W most of the amps are provided on the 3.3V & 5V rails. The 12V rail is rated at 16A which equals 192W. This might be enough if it were clean power.

If I had to guess I would say your problems are probably due to that PSU.

Before doing anything with the PSU I suggest you download a run memtest86 from a boot disk. This utility tests your RAM. No errors are acceptable.

I doubt the motherboard is the issue. As stated above the old MBoard is probably OK too.


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#14
June 1, 2009 at 23:56:07
But have you already perform a reformat?

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