Desktop PC randomly turns off

February 22, 2013 at 22:35:46
Specs: Windows 7
My 3 months old PC suddenly turns off randomly since last few weeks.
Returned it to the shop, but found no problem. Did not crash in the shop even when playing games.

So, it was back in my home and working ok for a week when suddenly it turns off again.

I am not knowledgeable in hardwares, but software I am ok. And so I was able to monitor CPU and MB CPU and fan thru BIOS, and everything is ok before it turned off, while still in BIOS.

About the problem, the power and fans are off, but there are still lights on inside the case. It is not possible to turn on again unless i unplugged the PC from the outlet.

Could someone advice what is wrong?
Could it be electrical problem in the house?


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#1
February 23, 2013 at 03:45:40
Overheating?
Weak, crappy low-end powersupply?
How are we to tell since you have only provided symptoms without giving any details of the patient.
Is it a name-brand OEM system? Was it custom-built?
How about some make/model numbers for the major components such as motherboard, CPU, RAM and powersupply.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
February 23, 2013 at 04:28:37
custom-built
Intel i7 3770k Ivy Bridge Processor
ASUS P8Z77-M PRO Motherboard
2x 8GB Corsair Vengeance Blue LP
ASUS GTX 660TI Video Card
OCZ VERTEX 4 128GB
Western Digital 500GB Blue
ASUS DVD 24X Writer
Fractal Design Core 3000 Case
Silverstone Strider ST50F-ES 500w Power SUpply

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#3
February 23, 2013 at 05:41:47
OK. This taken from a review of the graphics card:
"ASUS used two 6-pin PCIe power connectors on the ASUS GeForce GTX 660 Ti DirectCU II TOP video card and recommends at least a 550 Watt power supply with a minimum +12V current rating of 38A" http://www.legitreviews.com/article...

Your powersupply is only 500w with only 34A maximum on the 12V rail. It does not meet the minimum requirements of the graphics card so I would begin by requesting a PSU upgrade from the system builder.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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Related Solutions

#4
February 23, 2013 at 16:19:31
Agreed. Make sure that you are offered a quality power supply as an upgrade. Make sure that it has a single 12Volt Rail, Dual PCIe 6pin connectors, 80% efficiency or better, active PFC, a quality name brand, and a decent 3-5year warranty. If they offer you an upgrade in wattage, but not in quality, see if you can add a reasonable amount of money to get a better power supply. In other words, if they offer you a relatively cheap $45.00 power supply, but they have a name brand one that they sell for $70.00, maybe they will take $20.00 additional for the better one and you are then in much better shape. Look at:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
This is probably a lot better than they will offer you, but if the only thing you need to pay is the difference between the minimum they SHOULD have given you and this one, then it is not really that much.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
February 23, 2013 at 20:50:55
Thanks for the reply but based on the article, "ASUS used two 6-pin PCIe power connectors on the ASUS GeForce GTX 660 Ti DirectCU II TOP video card and recommends at least a 550 Watt power supply",
it is for TOP model, mine is the standard one, so maybe 500W is enough?
I am also wondering why after 3 months it will fail?

Although i will try to negotiate with the system builder if it is possible to change PS with minimum cost.


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#6
February 23, 2013 at 21:00:41
Also, to eliminate the possibility of it being an overheating issue, download and install HWMonitor and let it run while you use the computer. It will show you the internal temperatures at the moment, the minimum, and the maximum. Report these for idle, normal use, and gaming in degrees C for us to review. What the temperatures as well as which ones climb, will tell us where the heat issue is originating.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
February 23, 2013 at 21:07:42
I was monitoring the temperatures while in BIOS, and although I could not recall the exact values, but I am sure the values are less than 40 degrees Celsius, and it still turns off while I was monitoring.

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#8
February 24, 2013 at 21:04:33
Monitoring while in the BIOS does not tell you if it will heat up further during stressful usage, but if it turns off while monitoring in your BIOS, then I would lean towards the power supply or a bad memory stick.
Use Memtest to test your memory.
I also noted that you have the 3770K CPU. Since it and your motherboard are overclockable, it is possible that a BIOS setting is significantly off to cause the problem also. If you understand these issues, review your settings, if not, you may wish to ask them to do this for you.
Finally, it is possible that your power in your home is not 'clean' enough, or that an electrical wiring issue such as a ground fault or a reverse between the hot and neutral. To test these last two, you can purchase a plug in tester at your electrical supply or home center. If you have either, call in a pro to fix it. If you do not have good clean consistent power (especially in some rural areas), a UPS or 'battery back up' can do wonders to help this and protect your investment.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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