DELL N5110 - Generating more heat

April 13, 2012 at 17:58:21
Specs: Windows XP
Today I bought Dell Inspiron(i7) 15R N5110 Laptop and it is generating more heat. Is it the problem with this laptop or with this model.

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#1
April 14, 2012 at 05:53:48
Generating more heat than what? Did you check the temps?

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#2
April 14, 2012 at 06:44:20
did you buy it new? if used maybe you need some canned air to blow out air vents,be sure to have on a flat surface when operating.if still runs hot get a cooling fan that goes underneath laptop to make it run cooler.these are usually sold whereever laptops are sold.they are called cooling pads

Davidw


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#3
June 2, 2012 at 08:59:03
I also have a DELL N5110 I bought and use in Japan. I ran diagnostics and it was reading at 78 C. The laptop sometimes makes clicking sounds thru the speakers.

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Related Solutions

#4
June 8, 2012 at 16:58:08
Might be a common problem with your laptop, does it get hot when you are doing nothing or when you do something (anything like web browsing, word processing, gaming.etc), you get a flat surface that you can put between your lap and the laptop to stop it from making you uncomfortable, you can purchase laptop fans for around £20. atleast from most shops that sell laptops ans laptop accessories.

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#5
June 8, 2012 at 19:42:08
I used to have that problem with my Dell D400. It would run around 188 degrees F in the summer. As a result I would limit how fast the SpeedStep would allow my processor to run to keep it cool. When winter came, I'd let it run full throttle. I have since found a better solution. I downloaded Notebook Hardware Control at http://www.pbus-167.com/ and then undervolted my processor for all of the speeds. Now it only runs about 127 degrees F in the summer. Be sure to run some type of a stress test software such as Prime95 while doing this as you do not want to go too low with the voltage otherwise errors will be generated by your processor. Basically you just gradually drop the voltage for all speeds and see if Prime95 reports an error. If it does not then go down to the next voltage. Just keep doing so until Prime95 reports an error in which case you just go back up a volt. You should see a noticeable drop in temperature if you choose to do this. Prime95 can be found here: http://mersenne.org/

One other thing, be sure to get i8kfan from here: http://www.diefer.de/i8kfan/i8kfan.... It will help your fans to regulate the temperature better. It is designed for use with Dell laptops and should work with your laptop as well.


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#6
June 10, 2012 at 13:02:10
Just remember tweaking CPU voltages can be dangerous for the CPU.

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#7
June 10, 2012 at 21:00:29
That's only true if you overvolt your processor as that can burn it out. That's generally done when you over clock and requires a good cooling system such as water cooling. Undervolting doesn't do anything permanent to the processor. The worst that will happen is that the processor won't work correctly and will generate errors. That's were the stress testing comes in to catch it when it does occur. It lets you know where the limits are so you don't keep taking the voltage down to unacceptable levels. See the links below:

http://www.overclock.net/t/308654/u...

http://forum.notebookreview.com/har...

http://www.notebookforums.com/t/709...


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#8
June 11, 2012 at 11:02:00
Still its good to be cautious and careful.

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