Daisy-chained USB hubs don't power themselves on new laptop

April 16, 2013 at 15:46:53
Specs: Windows 7 x64, i7-2760QM/8GB
I have a number of USB hubs that I daisy-chain to save ports on my laptop for other things. These USB hubs are externally powered (ie.: they draw power from a dedicated power adapter, not just from host USB source).

On my previous laptop (HP Compaq nc8430) this worked fine. But on my new laptop (Lenovo W520), I have to physically disconnect and reconnect the second and third hubs for them to power on. Only the first hub will power on without my interaction.

How can I get them to all just power up on their own like they're supposed to?


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#1
April 16, 2013 at 16:11:49
"How can I get them to all just power up on their own like they're supposed to?"

Why do you think that is suppose to work without issues? The port you are connecting to can only supply so much power. The standard may call for multiple devices in series but in practice it doesn't work that well.

Something to note. Card readers, cameras, fingerprint readers, etc. are run off one of your USB controllers. So, when you connect a hub to that controller you may get only USB 1.1 speeds because the port is already part of a hub.

Try a different USB port.

Do you leave the hub powered and connected always? If not, try leaning the USB cable connected but interrupt the power. Turn power on AFTER the laptop is fully booted.


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#2
April 18, 2013 at 17:37:05
Why do you think that is suppose to work without issues? The port you are connecting to can only supply so much power. The standard may call for multiple devices in series but in practice it doesn't work that well.

a) because it worked perfectly fine before
b) if you read further, you'll my mention that they are externally powered

Do you leave the hub powered and connected always? If not, try leaning the USB cable connected but interrupt the power. Turn power on AFTER the laptop is fully booted.
Well, yes, I imagine that would work, but how is that any better than having to unplug it and plug it back in every time?


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#3
April 19, 2013 at 06:34:26
If you need 3 hubs to connect all your external hardware then perhaps a desktop computer would serve you better. Evidently you don't move your laptop often, if at all.

The standard calls for connection of up to 127 devices. In my experience this never works as well as intended.

Your old laptop had only USB 2.0 controllers. You new laptop has a mix of USB 2.0 & 3.0.

See the links below for specs.

USB 3.0 is supposed to be fully backward compatible with older devices. This is another case where things don't always work as designed.

From helping here, I see issues sometimes with certain classes of devices being more problematic.

I don't think the specs for your laptop will show which USB ports are USB 3.0 & which are 2.0 but you may have better luck on a 2.0 port.

http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/...

http://support.lenovo.com/en_US/det...


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#4
April 19, 2013 at 09:05:27
If you need 3 hubs to connect all your external hardware then perhaps a desktop computer would serve you better. Evidently you don't move your laptop often, if at all.
That makes no sense. Yes, I do need to use my laptop for mobility purposes. I have everything on a hub so that I only one one connection point for all my peripherals.

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#5
April 19, 2013 at 13:15:05
Just to understand, you have a hub connected to a single USB port and then have 2 more hubs piggybacked to the first hub?

Out of curiosity, What is the total number of peripherals that are connected to that laptop?

Is the setup on the hubs identical to when it was used on the old laptop?



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#6
April 19, 2013 at 15:50:52
Yes, anywhere from 10-15 or more and yes.

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#7
April 19, 2013 at 19:01:58
Well, all I have for you was in #3 above.

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