D865GBF board SATA II compatible

Vertex Oczssd3-2vtx90g
November 13, 2010 at 19:15:01
Specs: Windows XP, Pentium4 3.0GHz / 1 GB
Will an SATA 2 Solid State Drive work properly if connected to the SATA 1 connector on the Intel D865GBF motherboard in my Gateway PC? This drive would be used as the boot drive.

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#1
November 13, 2010 at 20:31:56
yes it will work but at half the normal bus speed. You probably won't notice any difference though.

Pentium 4s - The processors for the rest of us.


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#2
November 14, 2010 at 07:01:27
I have seen some SATA II hard drives that were ONLY capable of working with SATA II controllers. Those are the exception and were high performance drives. Solid state drives are considered high performance so it would be wise to double check before buying. If you post the model of the drive we should be able to verify, or you can check it out at the manufacturer's site.

That said, why are you buying a premium drive for a dated computer? Your cash but I am curious about your logic.


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#3
November 14, 2010 at 09:12:59
SSD I'm looking at is OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD3-2VTX90G 3.5" 90GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive. I intend to replace the original 40GB boot drive with this SSD. Rational? It's on sale at a great price at Newegg, should be very reliable and much faster even considering other system restraints.

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Related Solutions

#4
November 14, 2010 at 10:21:41
The SATA II specs (up to and including 300mb/sec burst data speeds) themselves are backwards compatible with the original SATA specs (up to and including 150mb/sec burst data speeds),
however,
some older main chipsets that support only the original SATA specs will recognize a SATA II drive as a SATA drive and run it at up to 150mb/sec burst data speeds,

BUT some other older main chipsets that support only the original SATA specs will NOT recognize a SATA II drive AT ALL when the drive is in SATA II mode.

In the latter case, if you want to be able to run the SATA II drive in SATA (150mb/sec) mode, you need to be able to install a jumper on two pins on the SATA II drive to force it to be seen by the mboard's bios and main chipset as a SATA (150mb/sec max) drive. Some SATA II drives have the pins and the jumper for that (e.g. at least some Seagate models), some don't (e.g. at least some Samsung models).

If your drive doesn't have that capability, if you can set the SATA controllers mode in the bios Setup to an IDE compatible mode, then the operating system will (probably) see the SATA II drive as an IDE compatible drive and recognize it fine - it will then be limited to the max burst data speed of either 100mb/sec or 133mb/sec on your mboard (your main chipset supports up to and including ATA100 - max 100mb/sec data burst speed - IDE drives).
.......

I looked at the manual (Intel calls it Technical Product Specifications) for this mboard model.

This is probably how you get your SATA controller(s) to run in IDE compatible mode.

In the mboard's bios Setup......

Advanced -

Drive Configuration submenu

ATA/IDE Configuration - must be set to Legacy ( not Enhanced, the default).

When that's set to Legacy
then
Legacy IDE channels appears
"Configures PATA and SATA resources for operating systems that require legacy IDE operation."

Set that to one of:

SATA P0/P1 Only, if you have no IDE drives
or
SATA P0/P1, PATA pri, for if you have up to two IDE drives on the primary IDE header
or
SATA P0/P1, PATA sec, for if you have up to two IDE drives on the secondary IDE header
.....

When the bios has the SATA controller(s) in IDE compatible mode, when you have one or more SATA drive(s), you don't need to install SATA controller drivers in the operating system, or provide them on a floppy disk when you boot using a 2000 or XP CD CD by pressing F6 near the beginning of loading files from the CD.
......

Also there -
Harddisk pre-delay - Disabled is the default, but sometimes if the mboard will not recognize a fast hard drive while booting reliably (or at all) you may need to set a delay time there - usually it doesn't need to be any more than 5 seconds.
....

SAVE bios settings before you exit Setup.
.................

"I intend to replace the original 40GB boot drive with this SSD. Rational? It's on sale at a great price at Newegg, should be very reliable and much faster even considering other system restraints."

You may not benefit from the faster speed capabilities of a solid state hard drive when it's connected to this mboard.

I have tried installing IDE drives capable of ATA100 or ATA133 specs on several older mboards that have a main chipset that supports only ATA33 or ATA66 specs, by connecting them to a modern PCI EIDE (PATA) drive controller card that supports ATA133 specs - in all cases, the max data burst speed of the drive was limited to the max data burst speed the main chipset supported. Mind you, they all had older main chipsets than yours.


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#5
November 14, 2010 at 12:37:34
It's your cash. $180 for 90GB is a lot of cash, IMO. You are not going to notice much performance improvement other than loading programs faster.

I would spend that cash elsewhere myself.


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#6
November 14, 2010 at 13:46:35
"I intend to replace the original 40GB boot drive with this SSD. Rational?"

No, not at all. I can understand your desire for more storage space & a faster drive, but it will be bottlenecked by the outdated technology your system is based on. Even if the drive works, it's speed can't make up from the crappy CPU/board combo & just 1GB RAM.

For the $180 you're going to spend on the SSD (that may or may not work), you could buy a modern motherboard, CPU, 500GB HDD & have money left over.


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