Creating First Partition on a Disk

Hitachi Hts541612j9sa00 120gb hard drive
December 30, 2010 at 11:10:52
Specs: Windows XP Sp3, AMD Sempron 3000+/ 512MB
I installed a 120GB Hitachi SATA hard drive into my desktop. Then windows would not recognize it so I went into the Bios and changed the SATA setting from RAID to IDE and then Windows could see it. Then I go into the Computer Management and then Disk Management and I can see the disk and it says 120GB unallocated and that the disk is NOT Initialized. Then I do not get a wizard to initialize the disk so then I can not right click it and create a new partition.
I have tried the drive on both Sata ports and with different Sata cables and both of the Sata power ports from my PSU. In the bios if I go into the bios where I can see all the disk drives on my computer and choose the problem one and then choose "IDE Auto-Detection" I get the correct disk size.

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#1
December 30, 2010 at 11:19:28
How is the drive listed in Device Manager? As IDE 3, 5 what?

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#2
December 30, 2010 at 12:13:00
Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
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The mboard's bios must be recognizing the SATA drive properly, when the bios has the SATA controller(s) in SATA a.k.a. AHCI mode (if it is not recognized in that mode, see the part of this post below the long dotted line).
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When you boot the computer from a Windows XP (or 2000) CD, if the mboard's bios Setup has the SATA controller(s) in SATA a.k.a. AHCI mode, the initial files loaded from the CD , by default, cannot recognize SATA drives because there are no SATA controller drivers on the CD.
The easiest way of getting around that is to set the mboard's bios so the SATA controller(s) are in an IDE compatible mode of some sort, Save bios settings, then the initial files loaded from the CD will detect SATA drives, as IDE compatible drives. When the SATA controller drivers have been installed in the operating system, then you can set the setting in the bios for the SATA controllers to SATA a.k. a. AHCI mode, Save bios settings.
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In order for a SATA drive to be recognized when you already have an existing Windows installation, in that operating system....

- if the mboard's bios Setup has the SATA controller(s) in SATA a.k.a. AHCI mode, the SATA controller drivers for the mboard must have been installed in Windows in order for the operating system to recognize the drive in Device Manager and in Disk Management. (If the drive you have an existing Windows installation on is IDE, those SATA controller drivers may not have been installed yet.)

Once the drive is being recognized properly, a blank drive will not show up in My Computer or Windows Explorer - you must software partition it (e.g. using the NTFS) and format it in Disk Management. Sometimes the Wizard to do that does not pop up. You should have no problem RIGHT clicking on the un-allocated space in Disk Management, and choosing to software partition and format it, if the drive is truly blank of data (the drive space is labelled un-allocated or similar) .
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Your mboard's bios should detect your probably SATA II drive model fine, if the mboard hardware supports SATA II specs, whether the SATA controller mode in the bios is set to a SATA or an IDE compatible mode. .

HOWEVER......

If you have an older mboard, if the mboard hardware (main chipset) supports only the original SATA specs (burst data transfer speeds up to and including 150mbytes/sec) , all new and fairly recent used SATA drives are SATA II drives - drives that support SATA II specs - (burst data transfer speeds up to and including 300mbytes/sec). Some mboards that support only the original SATA specs will recognize a SATA II drive fine anyway, and use the the original SATA specs with it (burst data transfer speeds up to and including 150mbytes/sec), HOWEVER, some other mboards that support only the original SATA specs will NOT recognize a SATA II drive properly, and in that case, you need to install a jumper on two pins on the drive to force the mboard to see it as a drive that conforms to the original SATA specs ( that limit it to burst data transfer speeds up to and including 150mbytes/sec). Some desktop hard drive models have the pins for that (e.g. most Seagate drive models), some do not (e.g. at least some Samsung models).
e.g.
All the Seagate SATA II desktop drive models I've bought so far have the pins for that and the jumper was already installed that limits it to the original SATA specs ( that limits it to burst data transfer speeds up to and including 150mbytes/sec).

If your hard drive model does NOT have the pins to force it to use the original SATA specs
- if the drive is new, if you got it locally, return the drive and get a different model that dies have the pins and the jumper

- best alternative choice - buy yourself a PCI SATA drive controller card and connect the SATA drive to that.
Don't use the last PCI slot, of the PCI slots, closest to the center of the mboard for anything but a PCI video card.
OR - buy a PCI-E X1 SATA controller card , if your mboard has a spare PCI-E X1 or PCI-E X4 slot, or a PCI-E X8 or PCI-E X16 slot that you're not using for a video card.
All new and fairly recent SATA controller cards have chipsets that support SATA II specs, any size of hard drive, and support ATAPI specs for optical (CD and DVD) drives.

You must supply SATA controller drivers for the card's SATA chipset on a floppy disk in a legacy floppy drive if you boot the computer from from an XP CD, or boot the computer using a "slipstreamed" XP CD that has had the SATA controller drivers you need integrated into it - if you make that, if your XP CD does not have SP3 updates, you are wise to integrate SP3 updates into the CD contents as well at the same time .

If you want to be able to boot an operating system from a drive connected to the card, you must be able to select SCSI in the Boot Order or similar list in the bios Setup, and SCSI must be listed before hard drive in the Boot Order or similar list.

- not as good an alternative choice - buy and use another type of adapter that allows the mboard to recognize the SATA drive connected to it as an IDE drive. No SATA controller drivers need to be installed, they support any size of hard drive, and support ATAPI specs for optical (CD and DVD) drives, BUT all such adapters I've seen the specs of so far either limit the drive to burst data transfer speeds up to and including 133 or 150mbytes/sec, or limit the drive to the USB max burst data transfer speed, which is much slower (it's rated in bits/sec, not bytes/sec - divide the rate in bits/second by 10 to get the approximate max rate in bytes/sec - 8 bits per byte, plus about 2 bits per byte for "overhead").


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#3
December 31, 2010 at 10:35:12
The drive is listed in Device manager under disk drives as a Hitachi hard drive then it lists the model number. In the bios the drive is listed as IDE 2.
The SATA connects to the mother board and the power supply are fine and they click and fit snugly.
If I go into the disk manager and RIGHT click on the drive to create a new partition the New partition choice is grayed out and the only choices are properties where i can look at drivers.
I have tried to upgrade drivers for the controllers and the hard disk it self they were all up to date.
Also if i try to install windows on the drive it tells me that I am unable to create a partition.

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#4
December 31, 2010 at 10:39:28
Are you connecting the SATA drive to a SATA port using a red SATA cable?

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#5
December 31, 2010 at 11:23:40
Yes the Sata cable i am using is red Sata cable.

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#6
December 31, 2010 at 11:38:52
If the drive does not show up in the bios when the bios has the SATA controller(s) in SATA mode, the only thing that can cause that is the main chipset on the mboard can't detect SATA II drives properly.In that case, you need to install a jumper on the drive to limit it to the original SATA specs, or get yourself a controller card or another adapter to connect it to.

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#7
January 1, 2011 at 11:32:09
So i put the hard drive using my sata cables in a friends computer and there i was able to format the drive and it functioned well on that computer. Then i put it back in my machine and i received the same problems. Also because this drive is from a laptop and therefore smaller i can not find any jumpers on the drive to limit the connection. So i guess i will have to look into one of those sata connection cards.
Thank You for all your help

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#8
January 1, 2011 at 12:30:20
"So i put the hard drive using my sata cables in a friends computer and there i was able to format the drive and it functioned well on that computer. Then i put it back in my machine and i received the same problems."

You're not getting it. That cannot work if your mboard bios cannot detect the drive when it has the SATA controller(s) in SATA mode. The hard drive does not have to have any data on it in order to be detected by the mboard's bios.

AND
If you install Windows on a hard drive when it was connected to one mboard, then move that hard drive and try to boot from it with the same Windows installation on it, if the hardware on the two mboards is more than a little different, Windows will often NOT load properly - that's normal. That can be fixed by running a Repair installation of the operating system without you losing the data you have added to the Windows partition after Setup was finished, if you have a Windows XP CD of the same version, Home or Pro, and a suitable Product Key.
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"this drive is from a laptop"

Regarding the info in response 2.

I haven't looked for a PCI or PCI-E X1 SATA drive controller card that you can use to connect a laptop drive to a desktop computer, but I suspect they don't exist, at least not ones that you connect a laptop directly to.

There's the lesser choice....

" - not as good an alternative choice - buy and use another type of adapter that allows the mboard to recognize the SATA drive connected to it as an IDE drive. No SATA controller drivers need to be installed, they support any size of hard drive, and support ATAPI specs for optical (CD and DVD) drives, BUT all such adapters I've seen the specs of so far either limit the drive to burst data transfer speeds up to and including 133 or 150mbytes/sec, or limit the drive to the USB max burst data transfer speed, which is much slower (it's rated in bits/sec, not bytes/sec - divide the rate in bits/second by 10 to get the approximate max rate in bytes/sec - 8 bits per byte, plus about 2 bits per byte for "overhead")."

OR there may be an inexpensive wiring adapter you can use that allows you to connect a laptop SATA drive to a desktop SATA drive data and power connector, in which case you could connect the laptop drive to a PCI or PCI-E X1 SATA drive controller card, which would yield you the full SATA II specs (burst data transfer speeds up to and including 300mbytes/sec).


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