Solved Create image of 5 TB HD?

February 23, 2017 at 15:28:20
Specs: Linux , i7 6700/12 GB RAM
I have a desktop that took me many tries and attempts to get it running right. It's running opensuse 42.2 and now is running everything flawlessly. I did create documentation because I ran into a lot of hiccups getting it working having to make manual config files and custom scripts to get all my hardware working. I have a 1 TB SSD drive and a 4 TB hard drive that is full of files linked by the 1 TB SSD. if it were to crash, restoring the 1 TB SSD in itself doesn't guarantee I won't spend days trying to set everything back up again. The 1 TB HD is about 25 percent full and the 4 TB drive is about 50 percent full. I know if I use clonezilla, I will need a 5 TB HD because it needs the destination hard drive to be at least how large the source drive is. I've used both acronis and ghost in enterprise setups with pxe boot and server imaging over the network. I'd reimage sometime 50 PC's at a time.

Both of those products compressed whitespace and I was able to image a larger HD to a smaller HD. And the image file wasnt the size of the HD... But the size of the data only. But everything I've found for consumers doesnt allow this. Unless someone knows something I don't... Hence this post.

Also, I need this software not to copy HD to HD... I need it to make an image that only contains data in the image without whitespace. So I can store the image files in HDS for when my PC messes up.

message edited by dorlow


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✔ Best Answer
February 24, 2017 at 10:44:40
I guess my question is the following. Why do you care if the image is the same size as the original? The advantage of not using compression is that you can easily access the files on the imaged drive.

I am guessing the files on the 4TB drive are movies, music, photos, etc. Those types of files are already compressed by the nature of the file type. So you can't get much more out of them anyway.

I don't see that it is critical to have the above mentioned files linked to your OS. They can be accessed by any OS that can read the file type.

If it were me, I would create an backup of the 1TB on a 1TB second drive and regularly perform a incremental backup of the 1TB. The 4TB will require much backups created on a different frequency than the boot drive.

A newer version of Acronis should be able to work for your purposes.



#1
February 24, 2017 at 03:51:29
I assume you really mean "free space" when you say "whitespace"?

Whitespace is the wrong term as that applies only to a screen or sheet of text.

Clonezilla can create disk images as well as disk-to-disk cloning.

However, even with disk imaging you cannot avoid the free space being included unless that free space is on a separate partition.

Disk images create images of partitions so if that partition contains some free space, that is unavoidably included.

You seem to show a poor understanding of what the process actually does.

To avoid copying the free space you need to do a file backup.

message edited by phil22


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#2
February 24, 2017 at 06:12:34
When I used ghost and acronis, it didn't backup Freespace and therefore allowed me to image a larger HD to a smaller HD. I'd assume the image would be imaging Freespace on the hard drive as whitespace in the image. Im an exchange admin. Free space in a database is whitespace because the database size includes that space and so does my image...

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#3
February 24, 2017 at 09:44:36
To backup the free space with Ghost (not sure about other cloning software) in the options section, choose sector to sector copying. This will truly mirror the original drive and it's structure.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 24, 2017 at 10:44:40
✔ Best Answer
I guess my question is the following. Why do you care if the image is the same size as the original? The advantage of not using compression is that you can easily access the files on the imaged drive.

I am guessing the files on the 4TB drive are movies, music, photos, etc. Those types of files are already compressed by the nature of the file type. So you can't get much more out of them anyway.

I don't see that it is critical to have the above mentioned files linked to your OS. They can be accessed by any OS that can read the file type.

If it were me, I would create an backup of the 1TB on a 1TB second drive and regularly perform a incremental backup of the 1TB. The 4TB will require much backups created on a different frequency than the boot drive.

A newer version of Acronis should be able to work for your purposes.


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#5
February 24, 2017 at 16:44:15
I need to compress the Freespace, not the videos.

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#6
February 25, 2017 at 04:50:16
I just tried Acronis to backup everything. It backed up about 3/4 of the 5 TB to the 3 TB HD and ran out of space even though there isn't 3 TB worth of data. So, Acronis True Image must be making a complete image also including free space.

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#7
February 25, 2017 at 05:24:11
There isn't as much free space when storing files that are already in an efficient package like MPEG or JPEG. That is the point I was making.

How is your 4 TB drive formatted?


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#8
February 25, 2017 at 06:49:27
My 4 TB HD is formatted in ext4.

So, I did as a previous post recommended... just imaged my 1 TB HD. I used Acronis True Image. My 1 TB HD only created a 81.2 GB image file. I've used Crashplan for years for backups of all my files. So, I'll probably just stick to this backup plan of backing up my files using Crashplan and creating a periodic image of my SSD 1 TB HD. I know that's the right way to do things. I just thought if my PC crashed and I screwed up all partitions (which I have done messing around in the past), that I could just restore my whole image in a few hours instead of almost a week of restoring Crashplan. Then maybe I could've done an incremental restore of some sort using Crashplan to restore the changes since the image... but I guess it won't work.


Still don't understand why, if my 1 TB HD created only an 81 GB image file and my 4 TB is half full, why didn't it fit on a 3 TB HD...

message edited by dorlow


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#9
February 25, 2017 at 14:07:59
Because the files are already compressed. Your OS drive had more slack space.

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#10
February 26, 2017 at 19:38:36
So, just a follow up. This morning, I installed pending updates the OS was prompting to install. After the updates finished, I received an error from the desktop. I rebooted and the PC failed to boot back up. So, I figured, no better time to test the image than now. I popped in the Acronis boot CD and restored the image from the external HD. After about an hour, my PC was restored and able to boot back up. Worked as slick as could be.

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#11
February 26, 2017 at 21:27:26
Good to hear.

If you think the issue is solved then choose a best answer so the thread can be marked as solved.


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