Solved CPU or something else overheating

December 16, 2013 at 19:05:59
Specs: win 7, AMD FX-6300/8GB DDR3
Temp recording
I bought a AMD FX 6300 black CPU. I installed it turn it on and than it's idle temperature was a bit suspicious at 40* (Celsius). First i thought it must be hotter it has 4 more cores than my previous cpu. But than i noticed when i started a game temperature shot up to 50* instantly and then even higher. I read that on this 6-core is quite alright up to 65* but no more. While i was playing i noticed the game started working badly and then crashed so being an old amd user i reached in to the case (the side of my case is always missing due to laziness) and felt the heatwave after shutting down i everething was worm cpu, chipset, video card, ram could not tell what was overheating so i downloaded CPUIDHWMonitor to check all the temperatures and it shows all kinds of temperatures i never heard of like AUXTIN,TMPIN3,SYSTIN. Anyway im gonna upload a picture with the temperature readings since i turned the PC on and played a few minutes to see if anything is heating up. On the CPU im using an aftermarket cooler "GammaArcher DeepCool" because i bealive it's better than the stock one the cpu came with. The thermal paste was applied by the book not too much not too little. I dont know what to do please help. Thank you.

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✔ Best Answer
December 17, 2013 at 20:32:57
First get a better case. You need the air to enter low in the front of the case, flowing back and up through all components and out the top rear of the case. Without the side cover in place, you do not get this and have hot spots in the case. You need a case that has a decent front vent down low in the front (intake fan is optional) and a rear fan high up on the back of the machine that is 120mm. These come in different amounts of air movement (CFM) where some are especially quiet and others have especially high CFM's (cubic feet per minute) and the cheap ones are often both noisy and have little air movement. With a top mounted power supply, that is what you need, for a bottom mounted power supply, you would need another rear or top exhaust fan.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
December 16, 2013 at 19:24:29
The AUXTIN temp is quite high, and it is most likely a thermal sensor on the motherboard... If the case is clear of dust and the motherboard itself isn't that hot, then it may be malfunctioning.

You've been helped by a 16 year old.


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#2
December 17, 2013 at 07:39:43
1st of all, the side panel must be kept in place for the case cooling to function properly. You're not doing your system any favors by leaving the case wide open.

2nd, what type of thermal material did you use when installing the heatsink & how did you apply it? You should have used a "middle dot". As stated in the following article, a tiny dot about the size of a grain of rice works best, a dot about the size of a bean is too much. If you did it differently, I suggest you remove the heatsink, clean off all the paste, then re-apply a fresh dab as shown.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/arti...

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/arti...

EDIT: I forgot to look at your screencast. I don't see a problem? The CPU is 13C (min) & 47C (max). Actually, 13C (55F) seems awfully low, what is the room temp?

message edited by riider


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#3
December 17, 2013 at 09:53:41
Are you overclocking your system? If you are, stop NOW before you fry your motherboard .

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Related Solutions

#4
December 17, 2013 at 16:28:03
Check the temp readings in the BIOS & try a different monitoring program. Why aren't you using the ASRock Extreme Tuning Utility?

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#5
December 17, 2013 at 19:13:24
I found out finally what was overheating. It was and still is the cpu under stress only. I reapplied the thermal paste no change (it was applied properly already). If i close the case all im doing is bottlenecking the air intake which is bad in my case because it's an old casing vary well sealed and overhung inside with something resembling corkwood to keep it as silent as possible. I used the stock cooler the cpu came with tested it and reached the conclusion that i really need bigger cooling. And that auxtmp i don't have the slightest idea what it is but what i know is that it does not vary what so ever.

Anyway thank you for your help.


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#6
December 17, 2013 at 20:32:57
✔ Best Answer
First get a better case. You need the air to enter low in the front of the case, flowing back and up through all components and out the top rear of the case. Without the side cover in place, you do not get this and have hot spots in the case. You need a case that has a decent front vent down low in the front (intake fan is optional) and a rear fan high up on the back of the machine that is 120mm. These come in different amounts of air movement (CFM) where some are especially quiet and others have especially high CFM's (cubic feet per minute) and the cheap ones are often both noisy and have little air movement. With a top mounted power supply, that is what you need, for a bottom mounted power supply, you would need another rear or top exhaust fan.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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