cpu host frequency

Intel / Pentium 4 ht
April 5, 2010 at 14:45:57
Specs: Windows Vista
Hey, I have a P4 3.00 Ghz HT cpu. I recently installed more RAM to bring it up to 2 gigs because i was expieriencing some delay problems with common tasks and a lot of delay with gaming and video. The RAM increase did not make a noticable difference, all though i seem to be able to have HT enabled now without random blue screens.

I have self taught myself what little I know of PCs through trial and error, but don't have a lot of experience with bios settings. I noticed that my cpu host frequency setting in bios is set to 200 mhz-- this does not strike me as correct after researching what other people's settings were with similar systems. I know this can harm my cpu if wrongly adjusted, so i was wondering if anyone had any input on what a more appropriate setting might be, or if not, why mine is so low.


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#1
April 5, 2010 at 15:09:03
If your host frequency is 100MHz, your CPU is NOT running at 3.0GHz....it's probably running at 1.5GHz. The host frequency should be 200MHz (800MHz FSB) & depending on what your board supports, you should be running either DDR400 or DDR2-533 RAM.

The CPU running at 1/2 speed would explain part of your gaming problems but you also need a decent video card. Unfortunately, you didn't state which video you're using. If you're using the onboard, it wouldn't matter how fast your CPU is or how much RAM you have, gaming performance will still suck.

Try running CPUZ to check your CPU & memory settings & report back what you find:

http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php


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#2
April 5, 2010 at 15:30:57
I don't know exactly what you mean to check on so I'll post the processor info n memory info. Oh and I have a radeon 9600 pro video card. I also believe both sticks of ram are 400 mhz, though the report lists their maximum bandwidth as 200 mhz. Hmmm... so much i don't know.


Edit: the host frequency is at 200 mhz, i typo'd the first post and you must have read it as 100 before i edited it.

Processors Information
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Processor 1 ID = 0
Number of cores 1 (max 1)
Number of threads 2 (max 2)
Name Intel Pentium 4
Codename Northwood
Specification Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz
Package (platform ID) Socket 478 mPGA (0x2)
CPUID F.2.9
Extended CPUID F.2
Brand ID 9
Core Stepping D1
Technology 0.13 um
Core Speed 3006.5 MHz
Multiplier x FSB 15.0 x 200.4 MHz
Rated Bus speed 801.7 MHz
Stock frequency 3000 MHz
Instructions sets MMX, SSE, SSE2
L1 Data cache 8 KBytes, 4-way set associative, 64-byte line size
Trace cache 12 Kuops, 8-way set associative
L2 cache 512 KBytes, 8-way set associative, 64-byte line size
FID/VID Control no


Memory SPD
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

DIMM # 1
SMBus address 0x50
Memory type DDR
Manufacturer (ID) Wintec Industries (7F61000000000000)
Size 1024 MBytes
Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)
Part number
Number of banks 2
Data width 64 bits
Correction None
Registered no
Buffered no
Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts
EPP no
XMP no
JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
JEDEC #1 2.0-2-2-6-n.a. @ 133 MHz
JEDEC #2 2.5-3-3-7-n.a. @ 166 MHz
JEDEC #3 3.0-3-3-8-n.a. @ 200 MHz

DIMM # 2
SMBus address 0x51
Memory type DDR
Manufacturer (ID) OCZ (7F7F7F7FB0000000)
Size 1024 MBytes
Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)
Part number OCZ4001024V3
Number of banks 2
Data width 64 bits
Correction None
Registered no
Buffered no
Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts
EPP no
XMP no
JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
JEDEC #1 2.5-3-3-7-n.a. @ 166 MHz
JEDEC #2 3.0-4-4-8-n.a. @ 200 MHz



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#3
April 5, 2010 at 15:37:33
(I started typing this when there were no responses, and your first post said 200mhz, not 100mhz)

There are lots of different P4 3.0 ghz cpus.
We need to know your model in order to determine which possible 3.0ghz cpus you could have, and what the appropriate host frequency should be.

Tell us the make and model of your brand name system, or if you have a generic desktop system, the make and model of the mboard.
The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere, or it can often be determined by going to the brand name's web site.
The model, sometimes the make, of a mboard in a generic desktop system is usually printed on the mboard's surface in obvious larger characters, often between the slots.

The model is often also displayed on a logo (graphical) screen early in the boot, but it's often not as specific as the specific model number.

For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.
........

It does no harm to the cpu when the host frequency is lower than it should be, but it's probably running slower overall than it should be if the host frequency is lower than it should be. If the host frequency is right, the overall speed of the cpu will be what it should be. If it's too high, if that's even possible, the cpu won't boot.

Games tend to have more more bugs in them than most programs, it's well known they do not work properly on all systems that at least meet the minimum requirements for the game, and they alone can produce blue screen messages in some circumstances on some systems. If you ONLY get the blue screen messages when you play a game, it's probably the game that's the problem. You could look to see if there are updates or patches or mentions of your problem in the FAQs and how to fix the problem on the game maker's web site, but often there's nothing you can do, and that game won't work properly on your particular system.

Not enough ram doesn't cause Windows blue screen messages, but a poor connection of the ram in it's slots, or ram that is not 100% compatible, can.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

For a laptop, or netbook, you must remove both its main battery and AC adapter before you do that.
......

Messages about insufficient memory in Windows are not about the the amount of physical ram installed in the mboard. They are either
- you're not using default settings for the size of the virtual swap file and it's too small, sometimes.
- or - there is not enough free space on the partition Windows is installed on for Windows to make a virtual swap file large enough, sometimes.
-or - there are bugs in programs you are using - e.g. common for games - and they are not releasing the swap file memory they are using properly.


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Related Solutions

#4
April 5, 2010 at 15:42:56
My system is not brand name-- homemade years ago. The motherboard is an albatron Px865PE pro

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#5
April 5, 2010 at 17:06:34
"the host frequency is at 200 mhz, i typo'd the first post and you must have read it as 100 before i edited it"

Then there's nothing wrong. Everything is as it should be.


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#6
April 5, 2010 at 17:16:07
There appears to be nothing wrong.

Your DDR ram - Double Data Rate ram - the 200mhz speed is supplied to it but because of the way the ram chips are wired up and organized, the modules in effect run at 400mhz.

"Specification Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz
Package (platform ID) Socket 478 mPGA (0x2)
CPUID F.2.9
Extended CPUID F.2
Codename Northwood " = runs at 800 mhz on the cpu

Your cpu is probably one of these three:
Socket 478
3.0ghz
CPUID String 0F29h
"Technology 0.13 um"
http://processorfinder.intel.com/de...
http://processorfinder.intel.com/de...
http://processorfinder.intel.com/de...

"Multiplier x FSB 15.0 x 200.4 MHz"

15.0 X is actually the Bus to Core ratio
The Bus Speed (inside the cpu) is 800mhz


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