Solved Could u help me with slecting the best gaming system parts..

February 17, 2014 at 12:42:37
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate Service Packs , Pentum 3.2GHz 8gigs
I'm getting a new desktop computers that will work with the Next-Generation video games.
Would somebody tell me what type of system or what parts are the best quality and inexpensive buy and when should I buy it?
What I really wanted to know is what type of Motherboard,CPU/Ram the amount of Ram and the best Video Card.
Thank you.

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✔ Best Answer
February 17, 2014 at 13:38:37
Make sure you find a PSU that is at least 450w and rated at 80+ or better. More watts is always better, as it allows you to upgrade in the future. How much you really need just depends on CPU and graphics card.

The '80+' just means it is 80% efficient. The more the better, as this means it generates less heat as well as saves power.

Try to find a case that supports bottom mount PSUs. Sure, it won't suck out as much hot air as a top mount, but you can put a 120mm fan there instead, which would be EVEN better.

Make sure the case is large enough for everything as cramped cases can cause heating issues.

Also make sure the case doesn't have a lot of useless openings, as this can cause dust and dirt to get into the computer, which is never a good thing.



#1
February 17, 2014 at 13:15:49
You need to tell us a budget and what that budget will include. Do you have any parts like monitor, keyboard, mouse, case, Copy of Windows?

You will most likely need a better power supply, even if you have one. Post what you have. Be specific with models.


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#2
February 17, 2014 at 13:21:44
First off, are you going to be putting this together yourself? I'm guessing you don't know too much about computer hardware (or else you wouldn't be here), so I would suggest having a professional put together your system, and probably help you pick out the parts.

That being said, you should first pick whether you want to use an Intel or AMD CPU. There are plenty of articles online that could help you choose.

Generally, Intel processors tend to be slightly higher quality, although they are generally more expensive. Because of this, you can often get more cores for the same price in an AMD processor. In addition, if you are planning on overclocking I personally would choose AMD over Intel. Sure, Intel uses newer tech, but AMD makes CPUs designed to really take a beating.

You usually should begin building your system around your CPU (although some will argue for the mainboard), choose # of SATA, PCIe, and DIMM slots you want (for hard drives, graphics cards, and RAM, respectively).

I doubt you would ever need more than two or three hard drives. You could only go with one drive bay, but it is good to leave room for upgrading in the future.

OtheHill is right, what kind of budget do you have?

message edited by NT56erbx


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#3
February 17, 2014 at 13:33:46
Personally, I suggest you get at least two PCI express slots. Try to find a motherboard that has PCIe 2.0 (16 lanes) at least. I haven't seen many 3.0s on the market, and although they exist, they tend to be expensive. Generally, using a graphics card with a 3.0 in a 2.0 slot will only give you about a 5% performance hit, as most cards can't really use most of the bandwidth provided by 3.0. (So long as both are 16 lanes, 8 or 4 lane 2.0 will give you considerably less performance) It really just depends on the card.

In the past, I have had better luck with AMD graphics cards over Nvidia, although really it is just a matter of personal preference, both make very good cards.

Getting two slots in the mainboard might seem like a waste, but you have to remember you can always buy another card, then connect them via either CrossFire or SLI to give you increased performance.

You also might consider getting an APU, which is a CPU + a graphics processor.

For RAM, I would suggest getting a motherboard with four slots. Two is doable, but doesn't give you much headroom for upgrades in the future. At the moment, most games only require about 4 GB of RAM, and I doubt any next-gen games will need more than 8. Personally, I got 2x4 GB of RAM, and plan on upgrading to have 2x4 + 2x8 in the future. If you get a mainboard with only two slots, you should probably get one 8 GB card instead of two 4 GB cards, so you can upgrade later without wasting your money later. Technically, having two cards (called dual channel) does give better performance, but it really isn't noticeable.

I suggest getting either 1600 or 1866 DDR3 RAM with a good CAS latency of about 9. For the most part, this is about all any mainboard or CPU can really fully use. Some CAN use higher, such as 2133 or 2400, but for the most part these are just factory OC'd cards, which you can do yourself.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 17, 2014 at 13:38:37
✔ Best Answer
Make sure you find a PSU that is at least 450w and rated at 80+ or better. More watts is always better, as it allows you to upgrade in the future. How much you really need just depends on CPU and graphics card.

The '80+' just means it is 80% efficient. The more the better, as this means it generates less heat as well as saves power.

Try to find a case that supports bottom mount PSUs. Sure, it won't suck out as much hot air as a top mount, but you can put a 120mm fan there instead, which would be EVEN better.

Make sure the case is large enough for everything as cramped cases can cause heating issues.

Also make sure the case doesn't have a lot of useless openings, as this can cause dust and dirt to get into the computer, which is never a good thing.


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#5
February 17, 2014 at 13:40:09
So, in summary, do a little reading, tell us your budget, and maybe go on some site like Newegg and pick out some parts. We can tell you if they're good or bad.

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#6
February 17, 2014 at 13:43:53
Ok, I have enough money to buy a extremely powerful system.
I have a Monitor that's perfect. I have a Keyboard, I have a mouse I have Windows 7 Ultimate & a Geforce 650m
Ok, I don't know that much about putting together a computer.
Thanks for the help and replying so fast

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#7
February 17, 2014 at 13:49:52
I will go to that site and report back to you all.
Sorry if I pick out the wrong items.

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#8
February 17, 2014 at 13:54:36
No problem :)

2 1/2 months ago I was just like you!


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#9
February 17, 2014 at 16:35:54
Sorry about the post above.
I'll fix it latter. I messed up with the links.
thanks again.

message edited by Splintercell


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#10
February 17, 2014 at 16:50:03
One other thing.
Would you recommend buying something from a site such as Dell.com or Alienware?
I bought a computer from Alienware quite a while ago and it was very expensive.

message edited by Splintercell


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#11
February 17, 2014 at 19:07:00
Most of us here ("hardware-guys", anyway) would encourage you to build your own system, but if you're not comfortable with that, then Alienware (now a subsidiary of Dell), has some strong gaming-machines (though as you noticed, expensive). Realize, though, you'd learn a lot more about the machine building it yourself (sorry, hardware-guy in me gets out sometimes)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#12
February 18, 2014 at 07:46:23
"What I really wanted to know is what type of Motherboard,CPU/Ram the amount of Ram and the best Video Card"

There are numerous different CPU sockets in use these days (AM3, AM3+, FM2, FM2+, 1150, 1155, etc) so you'll need to decide on a CPU 1st, then you can choose a motherboard with the correct socket. I recommend a board with 4 RAM slots for more flexibility with memory upgrades. For gaming, you should have at least 8GB (2 x 4GB). The RAM speed should be based on the CPU but generally DDR3-1600 or faster.

The following article should help with the video card choice: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

You'll also need to decide on the hard drive. Solid State Drives (SSDs) are extremely fast but very pricey (as high as $1 per GB). Standard HDDs are slower but much cheaper (less than 10 cents per GB). If you go with a SSD, you will still need a standard HDD for storage.

And you'll need to select a decent quality power supply to run the whole thing. The PSU is NOT the place to cut corners because the entire system depends on it. It should have plenty of wattage, a single +12v rail with high amperage, active PFC, 80 plus certified, & a good warranty (3-5 years).


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#13
February 18, 2014 at 10:05:24
Ok, One of my friends posted his gaming rig.

Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU X 980 Extreme Edition Processor @ 3.33GHz, 3341 Mhz, 6 Core(s)
Physical Memory (RAM) 6 x 2GB Corsair Dominator 240-Pin DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel #TR3X6G1600C8D
Hard Drive 4 x 2TB Seagate Barracuda ST32000641AS Internal Hard Drive (SATA II 7200 RPM 64MB)
Video Card Nvidia GTX 480 - 2GB GDDR5 <He's changing his graphic card soon>
Motherboard ASUSTeK Computer INC.
Digital Drives 2 DVD Drives #GH22LS40 and 1 BluRay Drive #BH10LS30

I wanted to tell me what you think about his setup. Should I setup my system like his? of course that's after I learn how to build my own system.

message edited by Splintercell


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#14
February 18, 2014 at 11:11:14
That system is already "outdated". The Core i7-980X is a n LGA1366 CPU & the 1366 socket was discontined in 2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_1366

The memory configuration is a bit odd. The 980X supports up to 24GB of triple channel RAM but he wasted all his RAM slots with just 2GB sticks. That means if he ever needed to upgrade, he would have to remove at least 3 sticks & replace them with 3 new ones. He would have been better off with 3 x 4GB with 3 slots reserved for future upgrades.

I don't know why he would possibly need 8TB of storage, but I have no idea what he uses the system for. And I also have no idea why would would need 3 optical drives. I suggest that you do NOT model your system after his.

Do you have a couple of grand to invest in a gaming PC? Keep in mind that it will only drop in value & performance. Have a look at this article:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...


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#15
February 18, 2014 at 11:41:44
He uses his system only for gaming.
I don't know why he needs 8TB of storage.

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#16
February 18, 2014 at 13:27:10
Yeah, no real point in 8 TB of storage, unless he had a RAID 10 system going or something? I would suggest just getting about a 2 TB (7200 RPM, SATA III) HDD, and maybe a 500 GB SSD (SATA III). You could, of course, decrease the size of these drives to save cash.

I agree with riider, getting a bunch of small RAM cards is a waste, and some will have to be thrown out if future upgrades are needed.

Definitely don't need a blu-ray drive, usually around $100 and mostly useless. Get one DVD drive (no need for two), you don't need a brand new one, can get some used ones for really cheap that still work great.

IMO 6 cores is kinda useless, so far haven't seen a game or program that needed f=more than four (although that may change with next-gen games).


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#17
February 18, 2014 at 20:35:59
If the money is not a problem, go with a 4th generation Intel i5 or i7 like the 4670K or 4770K which are overclockable to future proof your new system and a Z87 series motherboard, 4 RAM slots, one or two PCIe 16x slots, 2x4GB or 2x8GB RAM, a good quality power supply, and the best video card you can reasonably afford (between $150. and $350 is probably your target range).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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