Could 4 short POST beeps indicate PSU failure?

Mb: gigabyte / Ds3l
March 1, 2015 at 19:14:51
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate, Intel Core I3
Hi guys, I have a system built from the following main components:
Intel i3
Gigabyte Z68P-UD3
8GB Corsair Vengence LP memory
Gigabyte GTX 260 graphics
Corsair CX500 PSU
Cooler Master casing

What actually happened:
The problem started after I connect a Logitech Z623 to the onboard sound jack. After I switched off the PC it won't start again. Previously no POST beeps as there is no casing speaker. I have tried troubleshooting the system by connecting the PSU to another system and there was 4 distinct short beeps repeating until it stops. The other latter too did not start. I managed to find one old Pentium 4 system and replaced its PSU with the Corsair, it won't start. I need to ask experts in this forum to confirm the damaged part before buying a new replacement part.

My questions:
1. What could be the culprit?
2. Could the 4 beeps relates to the mainboard not receiving enough power from the Corsair PSU?

Thanks for all the helps.

Play it safe!


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#1
March 1, 2015 at 20:28:04
You need to check the beep codes of the motherboard/system you connected the power supply to in order to check it.

But it doesn't seem like connecting speakers would wreck a power supply. I suppose while troubleshooting it you disconnected those speakers, just in case?


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#2
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#3
March 1, 2015 at 23:03:52
I disconnected the speakers when the PC failed to start. I forgot to tell that when I switch on the PC the power LED light in front of the casing switches on for only about one second and I noticed that the casing and the processor fans twitch a bit but didn't rotate at all.

Play it safe!


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Related Solutions

#4
March 2, 2015 at 03:28:46
im thinking power supply if fans trys to start then stops few turns the turn off pretty sure power suppply is toast or not plugged in correctly

Davidw

message edited by Davidw


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#5
March 2, 2015 at 04:24:17
Agreed but SMALL remote possibility: If the computer was moved or tilted during the time you were plugging in the speaker then it is possible that a screw or small metal object moved around in the case and is now shorting out motherboard or other component. It is also possible that if the jack you plugged in the speaker to was the front jack then the front jack may be plugged in incorrectly to the motherboard and as soon as the plug from the speaker was inserted it caused a short that may have damaged the power supply. If this is the case then you had better recheck the motherboard to front panel connectors before risking trying another power supply. Finally, the also small possibility is that the jack that the speaker was plugged into or the speaker itself has a short in it that may have caused the damage to the power supply which will need diagnosing/careful testing before risking another power supply. these will require careful testing to evaluate and if you do not feel up to the task you may want to seek the help of a qualified technician. Remember that all Corsair power supplies carry a 3 or 5 year warranty so look into that as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
March 2, 2015 at 21:32:23
Thanks guys...will follow the recommendations and post the result.

Play it safe!


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#7
March 26, 2015 at 19:05:47
With all the suggestions, yesterday I purchased a Cooler Master V650 Semi Modular and removed my Corsair CX500. Switched on my PC and it runs...

Thanks for the helps guys...

Play it safe!


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#8
March 26, 2015 at 19:35:15
You're welcome. Thanks for letting us know how it turned out.

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#9
March 28, 2015 at 10:27:46
> But it doesn't seem like connecting speakers would wreck a power supply.

Sure they can. Just do a search for “speaker overload” or “speaker impedance” and you’ll find lots of information about how adding too many speakers and/or speakers with the wrong impedance can overload the source and at best, blow a fuse, at worse, burn the electronics.

That said, the Z623 is a set of computer speakers, so it should be designed to work with a normal sound-card.

Since the audio-device was on-board sound, it might have used cheaper components than a dedicated card, so it is possible that the speakers overloaded it, caused it to draw too much power, and blew the PSU. You’re lucky the motherboard didn’t die.

A couple of things to look out for in the future to prevent it from happening again are to use a good PSU, and not use a bunch of splitters to attach more speakers to the audio-adapter (especially an on-board one).


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#10
March 28, 2015 at 22:41:12
Apparently that speaker system is powered separately from the computer via a standard AC cable to the wall socket. As with most modern computer speakers the computer only feeds an audio signal to them--no power. How are "speaker overload" and "speaker impedence" in play here?

Now I suppose some flukey one-in-a-million glitch could cause speakers to ruin a computer's power supply but leave the speakers and motherboard OK but I can't think of a way that could reasonably happen.


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#11
May 2, 2015 at 07:01:07
> that speaker system is powered separately from the computer via a standard AC cable to the wall socket…

You said it was unlikely “speakers would wreck a power supply”, not “those speakers…”, so I clarified that it is possible in some circumstances in case anyone found their way here and got a wrong impression about all speakers.

> ruin a computer's power supply but leave the speakers and motherboard OK but I can't think of a way that could reasonably happen.

It does seem odd since a surge would have to follow a path through the whole system to reach the PSU.

message edited by Synetech


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