convert linux to FAT32 on flashdrive without losing data

March 4, 2019 at 11:37:19
Specs: Windows 10
hi
trying to convert a USB3 flashdrive from a linux based format to FAT32 so it will be recognized by a Samsung TV. Various YouTube offerings say to use EASEUS or File Manager to format the drive, but I think this will delete the movies already on there. Question is how to convert the file format from Linux "Other" based format to FAT32, whilst keeping the data. This is for MP4 and AVI files downloaded . Thanks

See More: convert linux to FAT32 on flashdrive without losing data

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
March 4, 2019 at 12:34:26
Even if you could convert without losing data, you would want to backup the files anyway just in case the conversion goes south. That being said, why don't you just copy the files to your computer, then format it and copy them back?

Reply ↓  Report •

#2
March 4, 2019 at 12:42:40
And if there any files on that usb stick which you wouldn’t like to lose... first copy them to a more reliable storage medium. DVD at least, also a hard drive if possible.

USB flash drives are not intended for serious, longer term storage; they can, and do,fail at any time.


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
March 4, 2019 at 13:00:07
Good idea - the problem I have is when I plug the usb in to the laptop it doesn’t read the usb it says I must format the drive before I can do anything . Weirdly the usb is recognised by one model of Samsung tv but no others . I bought a Samsung 7 series this week brand new tv and it won’t play yet it works on a one year old Samsung !

message edited by wookie


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 4, 2019 at 13:42:02
Seems win-10 can’t read fat32; that option stopped after win-7

https://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/...

This is a link detailing the EaseUs approach:

https://www.easeus.com/partition-ma...

Possibly you could boot the system with a Linux dvd, and then access and copy the files to another usb stick formatted as ntfs.


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
March 4, 2019 at 15:00:53
Just copying files from a Linux based computer to a USB drive doesn't change the file format. You would have to go out of your way to reformat your USB drive to a Linux file system. And what file format would that be - ext2, ext3, ext4, etc? If the drive is recognized on a Windows system, it does NOT contain a Linux file system.

It would help to post the model/model numbers of your Samsung TVs.
https://www.samsung.com/hk_en/suppo...

Maybe this is what you need: https://www.easeus.com/resource/you...

message edited by riider


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
March 4, 2019 at 15:20:56
I had In mind the routine of using a Linux boot to create an ntfs usb stick, then copying the files from the fat32 stick to th Linux formatted stick; which could even be one of the standard Linux variants - ext 2, 3, 4.

There is a free 10day trial option for this read Linux formats on Windows Utility

https://www.paragon-software.com/ho...

which be useful using that option.


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
March 4, 2019 at 17:20:53
I can still format/read/write USB flash drives to FAT32 on windows and on linux based system.
If your flash drive has linux format EXT2 or EXT3, try this windows driver to access it:
https://www.pendrivelinux.com/acces...

Copy the data off the flash drive and reformat the flash drive to FAT32.
It should possible to use the flash drive in all your devices at home.


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
March 4, 2019 at 17:27:36
Win-10 doesn’t like (support) fat32. At least from what I read via google...

Reply ↓  Report •

#9
March 5, 2019 at 08:51:38
I'm not sure that's true, I've got many thumb drives with FAT32 that Windows 10 can read just fine. However, they are all 8 gigs or less.

I wonder if it's the larger drives the Windows 10 has problems with using a FAT32 file system?


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
March 5, 2019 at 17:04:50
Even 16GB are no problem here. use it regularly without problems so far on windows, linux & TV

Reply ↓  Report •

#11
March 6, 2019 at 12:09:56
Thanks everyone I need to put time aside to look into these at the weekend - this is to help a terminally ill man watch films in his bed so will be really useful to get this working . Thanks for your responses

Reply ↓  Report •

#12
March 6, 2019 at 14:28:28
I take onboard the obvious differences here in that pholks here find they "can" access fat32 flash drives (at least); but possibly the issue is with larger devices (HHD/SSD)?

Or is that M$-land snuck in a fix/update of sorts to allow fat32 again?

Certainly there is info out there in web-land to the effect that win-10 won't read ( and write to?) fat32 devices.

These day M$-land doth appear to enjoy creating konphusions galore over what their current (which/whenever it may be) OS can do and not do...


Reply ↓  Report •

#13
March 6, 2019 at 18:41:17
Well, considering the link you provided to prove Win10 didn't support FAT32 was one person claiming it didn't work and literally everyone else in that thread saying it DOES support FAT32, or other people saying they have similar problems irregardless of the file system, chances are good Win10 always supported FAT32 and there's another issue(s) going on.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Reply ↓  Report •

#14
March 7, 2019 at 00:01:04
Fair point. For MS to drop fat32 support doesn’t come across as logical considering the extensive use of fat32 today. This article emphasises the latter aspect.

https://www.engadget.com/2011/09/19...

Doing a retrawl with a slightly different string, seems to show the issue being not uncommon in 2016, and on various sites.

Yet another retrawl with another string brought out somewhat similar, and included this from Easus, which seems to support my earlier thoughts re’ it being the size/capacity of the external device that is the problem.

https://www.easeus.com/partition-ma...


Reply ↓  Report •

#15
March 7, 2019 at 00:06:06
Were the files recorded on the old TV? Such recordings are normally encrypted and can only be played on the TV they were recorded on.

Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question