Computer Switched by Repair Company. Advice please.

Lenovo Ideapad yoga 2 pro silver 13.3" u...
April 22, 2017 at 06:26:03
Specs: 20266
I sent my shiny "as new condition" looking Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro away for repairs as it was playing up and still under extended warranty.
After many weeks it was returned only ithis one was scratched, worn and coated in a film of dirt/grease. My instant reaction was that l had been accidently given the wrong computer so l called the repair shop to be told that although it was "possible" l got the wrong computer, that it "should" be the same one and to check that the serial number stuck to the bottom of the laptop matched my paperwork.
So l checked and yes the "sticker" matched the receipt. Not convinced, l called Lenovo and gave them my details and asked if my motherboard had been replaced could l still ascertain whether this was my computer or not. They asked me to go into the black screen bios thingy and type in some codes. Well......turns out that its not my computer. The tech was really interested in my story and conferred with 2 other techs who all agreed that "for whatever reason" that the computer returned to me was not mine.
These are big companies lm dealing with and l would suspect that they wouldnt like people finding out about these practices.
(Lenovo is not in anyway involved in the warranty claim as it is an extended warranty claim.
The retailer, insurance company and repair centre are all in talks but saying very little to me at this time.
I need a computer for work and have already lost a lot of money whilst waiting for the return of my laptop.
All l got from the insurance company was a directive to return the laptop to the repairer once again to be "sorted out"
I am really unhappy with this situation and at a loss as where to go from here.
Does anyone have any advice or a possible explanation as to why the repair company might of done the dodgy. Also, l have no idea how common this is or what l am entitled to ask for in regards to a replacement or compensation.

message edited by Cranky1


See More: Computer Switched by Repair Company. Advice please.

Report •

#1
April 22, 2017 at 07:00:32
It would probably depend upon whatever you signed on the purchase of the new machine and the laws in your area (I'm guessing by your spelling of the word "centre" that you're either in Canada or the UK). Review whatever documentation you got with the machine when you bought it (if any) carefully. Apparently it's becoming more common for this type of practice for almost anything electronic :

https://9to5mac.com/2016/07/20/appl...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Report •

#2
April 22, 2017 at 07:11:41
Where are are you located - country at least...?

Report •

#3
April 22, 2017 at 07:12:15
My extended insurance states that
*If the computer can not be repaired, that it is replaced with a new computer. (If model isn't available they will replace with the equivalent model or the dollar value of the purchase.
I live in Australia and here it is considered fraud/theft.
Incidentally, my original serial number is stuck to the bottom of this grubby computer.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
April 22, 2017 at 07:36:38
The retailer and insurance company's explanation is that the serial number changed with the replacement of the motherboard, yet Lenovo do not agree.
Can anyone confirm how Lenovo are so sure?
I am computer illiterate and at a loss as to how to explain why Lenovo can tell the laptop is not mine by going into the bios thingy as l see many posts talking about serial numbers changing when replacing motherboards.
Do Lenovo systems have a serial imprint of sorts that doesnt alter despite the addition of a new motherboard or is it possible they checked the mystery serial number on this computer to reach their conclusion. I need to get my head around this so l can stand my ground when l go toe to toe with the insurance company.

Report •

#5
April 22, 2017 at 07:39:44
"I sent my shiny "as new condition" looking Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro away for repairs as it was playing up and still under extended warranty"

If the original warranty expired & you're into the extended warranty period, it's doubtful your ultrabook is in "as new condition". A quick Google search finds reviews of the Yoga 2 Pro with i5-4200u CPU & 128GB SSD dating back to 2013. Also, what do you mean by "playing up". That could be just about anything.

What is the exact wording of the warranty repair/replacement. Is it this?

"your Service Provider, will either, at its discretion, 1) repair it to make it
function as warranted, or 2) replace it with one that is at least functionally equivalent."

http://c.shld.net/assets/docs2/spin...

Looks like they went with option 2.

message edited by riider


Report •

#6
April 22, 2017 at 07:52:59
The "appearance" of my computer is/was "as new".
I only used it for work and kept it in an expensive case padded with velvet like lining that had soft velcro straps. It was still shiny and never had a scratch on it.
I purchased it in 2015.
The "appearance" of the computer l have is poor. It is coated in a filthy scum and is badly scratched.
The mouse pad thingy is extremely worn down and kind of slippery and hard to control where mine was not. I will find insurance quote and paste.

message edited by Cranky1


Report •

#7
April 22, 2017 at 08:01:10
Extended Care Plan - Lumley Insurance

I can not for the life of me copy and paste the brochure. But this is my insurance policy.

The insurance company dont have any qualms about replacing my computer for a new one if it was not able to be repaired.

My only real issue is proving to the insurance company that this is not my computer.
If anyone can confirm/explain how Lenovo know for certain its not my computer l would love to know.

message edited by Cranky1


Report •

#8
April 22, 2017 at 08:41:03
Cranky1

You can't post a PDF like that. You can either copy and paste the actual text, or use a third party app that you upload the PDF to.


Report •

#9
April 22, 2017 at 08:49:59
My phone and limited knowledge couldn't get it up, sorry.

Report •

#10
April 22, 2017 at 09:33:20
Do you have "any" original documentation - sales invoices, delivery notes etc. from day one? Possibly there is information on some of that which may include specific references (numbers...) to components I'm thinking serial numbers for the actual unit itself; serial numbers etc. for the motherboard.

You might get some help from the local the Better business Bureau or Chamber of Commerce? Equally is there a local radio or tv station with a local "jock/jockess: who likes to look into such situations - as it makes good local news and good publicity for the station if/when they find, expose and resolve it all?

Also do you have "any" information you may have acquired system reports - typically Belarc or SisSandra utilities - which generate a very complete picture of the system at time they are run? Equally any photos of "your" laptop; and anyone around who could/would vouch for its pristine (well almost) condition when last they saw it?

Changing a motherboard ought not have required a change of the actual laptop case/housing... That they have apparently changed the case too does have wondering a little if there is a possible scam going on here...? Not saying there is and that they are covering up something... but a possibility nonetheless. This of course presumes that you're fully in the clear; I'm wishing to be fair to the other side in saying that...; and not suggesting that you are working a number...


Report •

#11
April 22, 2017 at 10:06:48
You say that in your country this is considered to be fraud/theft. So, contact the police and report the crime.

Report •

#12
April 22, 2017 at 10:31:24
I have taken screenshots of serial numbers but not sure if l can paste them on here.

message edited by Cranky1


Report •

#13
April 22, 2017 at 10:37:03
My computer was great and still looked like new but came with the usual yoga2 pro issues, mustard yellow colour, constant issues with the driver and screen flickering. Yet as l wasnt on it a lot, l wasnt too worried. But l recently got a new job where l needed a reliable computer so thought while its still under warranty l should iron out its wrinkles before l start work.
When l called the repair place he said he had plenty of yogas with the same issue and generally "rode them off". I was surprised when l got a message saying they were going to repair it but was fine with it being fixed cos its actually lovely little laptop. But 5 days ago l received this dirty scratched computer with windows 8.1, a wonky pad and that runs hot with MY serial number stuck to the bottom of it. I have all my paperwork and my computer is registered with Lenovo who have stated that the serial number on the device tells them its not mine.
So lm not sure how l could be in the wrong.


Report •

#14
April 22, 2017 at 10:53:39
Hi Cranky, you have wasted much time here and you do not need be Computer Literate for this matter. - It is theft.

Put together a short letter to the Repair Center giving 2 or 3 days to return your Lenova, otherwise you will be involving the Police.

Send the letter recorded or signed for delivery.

Copy it to your Insurance Company and Lenova Customer Services Manager..
Ensure letter shows it has been cc to them.

Take photos of the returned Lenova, especially any identifying marks/scratches.
e.g. does the label look as if it has been moved from yours?
Compile a list of differences to yours if possible.

With such matters it is essential to have things in writing and keep notes of who you speak to and when.

Here in the UK, I watch the reality series 'Australian Police Force'.
Clearly the dna of all those convict we sent over is deeply entrenched! :-)

Good Luck - Keep us posted.

message edited by Mike Newcomb


Report •

#15
April 22, 2017 at 11:00:53
I posted for some advice.
I was just hoping to confirm what thecLenovo techs said is "gospel". They saidvthat even though the motherboard on a Lenovo yogo 2 pro has been replaced the serial number in the bias screen should still remain the same. They (3 of them):agreed that it isnt my computer.
If anyone thinks different, l would love to hear why.
Simply because....the repair company is going to try and prove that they did not replace my computer with somebody elses and l just want to educate myself as to why it's possible or why its not possible to have a random serial number on a Lenovo that they claim is mine. If nobody can help...thats fine. But please dont give me a hard time. Im just a chick hoping to prove that somebody did actually switch my computer on me. (This computer also has an i7 processor, mine did not)

Report •

#16
April 22, 2017 at 11:09:41
Thank you for your advice Mike, they are great tips.
I will definately write a letter tomorrow stating all those things and hope for the best.

message edited by Cranky1


Report •

#17
April 23, 2017 at 03:07:56
Hi Cranky.

Take time and consider carefully what you are putting in the letter and how it is composed - it is time well spent..
Keep the letter as concise as possible.
At this stage, you should NOT include ALL details in case they could used against you.
e.g state 'different serial number(s)' but do not provide them.

I do not think anyone here was intentionally giving you a hard time, and were only trying to help.

As a matter of interest, where are you located - City / State?
I am based in West London, although currently in my Wife's Village, Contursi Terme, south of Salerno..
,
Wish you luck.
Regards - Mike


Report •

#18
April 23, 2017 at 03:51:43
I note you observe the laptop you have now (the switch) has a different processor to your original? If that is so keep that information out of any letters to the company (for now at least). Let Lenovo know perhaps and see if they can confirm whether or not your original laptop had an option for that processor? If it didn't then I suggest it pretty well indicates you have been diddled..; that the company has swiched your laptop for another.

Incidentally, in the UK, and also in Canada (which has a legal system similar to and based on the UK model) one must be very careful how one phrases possible future action, especially with regard to legal process and also police involvement.

It is considered wise and advisable to include the phrase "sine judice" - or its English equivalent - without prejudice. It is saying you are not presuming or prejudging, nor making a direct threat; but nonetheless giving notice, an indication of possble further action if needs-be.

Depending on how you compose your letter, its syntax, depends on how and where you include that phrase; but do include it. You mght simply start the letter with the phrase itself on its own (in inverted commas "" .) and then continue with the rest of your letter in a new paragraph.

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#19
April 23, 2017 at 05:57:37
Thanks heaps guys, l really appreciate your advice and will definately use your suggestions.

I am in the Queensland (Mackay) area.
Omg.... l think l have googled more this week than in the past 2 years.😨😨


Report •

Ask Question