Computer shuts its self down

August 16, 2009 at 07:56:03
Specs: Vista home premium
Okay heres the problem
My computer screen (lcd) goes black and and says no signal.
My tower power lights are on and he usb devices are still getting power.
When trying to access the hard drive via home network they are not accessable.
I am running vista home premium but this isnt the problem i put in different harddrive and ran xp from different machine and it still went to the same state.
Specs are:
Gateway GT 5656
Amd Athlon 64 X2 6000+
3gb Samsung ram 2 1gb and 2 512
Nvidia geforce 9400 gt grafics card
3 sata hard drives 1 1tb, 1 500gb and 1 160gb.


Please help and thanx in advance


See More: Computer shuts its self down

Report •


#1
August 16, 2009 at 08:37:57
"My computer screen (lcd) goes black and and says no signal."

The message is probably generated by the monitor itself, not by the system, starting a few second safter it detects it's getting no video signal from the computer. The led on the monitor usually turns to it's standby color along with that - e.g. yellow or orange rather than green .
You may get the same message when the monitor is on and is not plugged into the computer at all.

"When trying to access the hard drive via home network they are not accessable."

Your computer is not working properly.
......

You may have a poor connection inside your case somewhere.

Unplug the case/power supply.
Power off your monitor.
Open up the case by removing the left panel as seen when you're looking at the front of the case.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle. Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

Some Dell cases have a latch you must push one way rather than screws you must remove at the back of the case.

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
......

DO NOT try different ram in the mboard! There's probably nothing wrong with the ram you already had if it was working fine previously, and the ram you try may NOT be compatible with the mboard even when you think it should work fine - in the worst cases when incompatible ram has been installed the mboard will NOT boot and the system appears to be dead.
The same goes for testing your ram in another mboard - it hasto be compatible with the other mboard otherwise that's not valid.
.....

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.

With the cover still off, restore the AC power, start the computer and make sure the cpu fan spins - if it doesn't spin, if you're sure the power supply is working okay, don't use the computer until you have replaced it.
If it spins too slowly, and/or if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - replace it as soon as you can.
........

Try booting your computer.
If it still doesn't work, this is the most likely thing....

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
They often partially work, fans and hard drives may spin, leds may come on, yet you may get no video and the mboard will not boot all the way.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is failing, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.


Report •

#2
August 17, 2009 at 07:15:57
thanx for the help turns out that my video card has gone bad. which sucks cuz i just got it a month ago oh well. i opened it up and noticed that the fan on the card wasn't spinning so i took it out and the problem stopped!! thanx again

Report •

#3
August 17, 2009 at 07:36:45
If the card is only one month old you should be able to RMA it. Contact the manufacturer for a replacement.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 17, 2009 at 09:15:41
If your problem initially was you were getting no video but the computer seemed to be working normally otherwise - e.g. the hard drive led was blinking as it normally does while loading Windows - then the title of your Topic is NOT appropriate and is mis-leading.

It's extremely rare for a video card to fail if it worked properly when you first installed it and for a while after that, if you installed it properly, and if the PS capacity is sufficient.
If it has a fan on it that came with it, if the fan fails that can certainly kill the video card, but that fan usually lasts at least a couple of years.

Sometimes all that is wrong is the video card is not getting a good connection in it's slot.

Did you try making sure the video card was all the way down in it's slot, and/or re-seating it? If in doubt, remove the card from it's slot, install it again.

Video card warranties don't cover you following the wrong installation or removal procedure.

ATX power supplies are always powering ATX mboards in some places including some contacts in the ram and video slots even when the computer is not running, as long as the PS is connected to the mboard, the PS is on, and the PS is receiving live AC power. If you did NOT disconnect the AC power to PS, at any time, while connecting or disconnecting anything connected to the PS or the mboard, you can easily damage mboard components and circuits, including the video card and the video card slot's circuits.

If they have been damaged by that, the video card and/or the video slot circuits may work okay for a while and THEN fail.
.....

If that doesn't apply, or if it does but the video card and the slot circuits for it was not damaged....

"Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. "

Which make and model of video card is it?
What's your power supply capacity??

NOTE that brand name systems often have a PS with a meagre output capacity - it will handle you installing a modest video card, but often cannot handle you installing one that requires more power.

If the PS is inadequate for when you have the video card installed, the video card often works properly at first anyway, but the PS is overloaded 100% of the time when it is running with the video card installed and the PS is eventually damaged by that and can eventually fail completely.
In that case, it's quite possible the PS has been damaged and can no longer run the video card, and there may be nothing wrong with the video card - it should work on another computer that has a PS with enough capacity .


Report •


Ask Question