Solved Computer Shuts down suddently.

June 4, 2015 at 19:40:11
Specs: Windows 7, Amd FX 6 core
Hello,

I bought a computer awhile back from my local dealer, and it shuts off randomly without any notification. It does it randomly. I can be playing games, browsing the web, even using microsoft word.
Here are some of my system specs:
OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Professional
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
System Manufacturer Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
System Model GA-970A-DS3
System Type x64-based PC
Processor AMD FX(tm)-6100 Six-Core Processor, 3300 Mhz, 3 Core(s), 6 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date Award Software International, Inc. F6, 23/10/2012
SMBIOS Version 2.4
Windows Directory C:\Windows
System Directory C:\Windows\system32
Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume1
Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "6.1.7601.17514"
Time Zone Eastern Daylight Time
Installed Physical Memory (RAM) 8.00 GB
Total Physical Memory 7.98 GB
Available Physical Memory 5.51 GB

I already updated my bios, and my computer is not overheating.

Thank you for your theoretical help,

Sean Maher


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✔ Best Answer
June 6, 2015 at 05:22:50
Your graphics card is running very hot and that is not good. As above, if the specs list the max for the card as 100C and you are showing 99C just before freezing then there is the reason for the freeze. As also stated, the temperature of the motherboard is rising at the same time, then we have to assume that your case does not have proper cooling.
Your link just brings me back to this page. I Googled your power supply, it is a very cheap model. They are not listing the detailed specs but I was able to zoom into the label and it shows the typical numbers I would expect of a cheap power supply, namely that the 3V and 5V rails show more amperage available than the more useful 12V rail. Your shows: 3V: 30A, 5V: 36A, 12V: 25A so that your 450Watt power supply is saying (if true) that it really has the power of a quality 300Watt power supply. This 'should' be enough for your system but you should consider replacing it with a much better model like this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
$40. but only $20. after rebate.

Please explain how many case fans your system has, where they are, the size of them, and the direction they blow (intake/exhaust), where the power supply is mounted (top or bottom), and where there might be additional fan mounts. It might just be that you need a better case fan with a much higher CFM rating. Case fans are not expensive and range mainly from $3. to maybe around $20. but the thing you will want to look for is one that has a high CFM with a fairly low DB rating (noise). Also look for a fan with the number of pins that match your motherboard (3pin or 4pin) and you can start with these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
I used their tools to locate those with high CFM, low DB, dual BB (my preference) to get you started.
That would be my first step and I would also replace the power supply which will also probably move more air out of your case than the smaller fan on your power supply as well as protect your system from issues a cheap power supply creates.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
June 4, 2015 at 19:44:26
Please post the make/model/wattage of your power supply.

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#2
June 4, 2015 at 20:58:59
Hello,

I have a 450w power supply, not sure on the make or model, its branded with the distibutor of the pc, which is Canada Computers.


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#3
June 4, 2015 at 21:26:59
It may cause with
Power supply unit is faulty or right voltage cannot be set
Power cable issue
Did you tell that when it cause exactly?
For ex. playing games?..
Are you sure your pc is not over heating (processor as well as motherboard)?

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Related Solutions

#4
June 5, 2015 at 02:14:26
How olde is the computer?

Is it still under warranty...? If so have you considered going back to the vendor?


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#5
June 5, 2015 at 04:56:44
Random shutdowns are often the sign of an overloaded or failing PSU. If you don't know the make/model, open the case & get the info off the label.

I checked the Canada Computers website & unfortunately they don't post detailed specs for their branded systems. This one appears similar to the info you posted:

http://www.canadacomputers.com/prod...


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#6
June 5, 2015 at 07:46:24
To my knowledge, there are six things that can cause a PC to shut off suddenly, and three have already been stated.

1) The heatsink for your CPU and its seating should always be checked, even if you think your PC isn't overheating. Temperature spikes can happen very quickly when your CPU is taxed. If the heatsink is off by even a fraction of a millimeter, positive contact over most of the apportioned CPU surface can be lost, and it could be that your setup has been "just getting by" as far as CPU temperature control is concerned. Also, if this is the case, then the constant higher temperatures will shorten the lifespan of your CPU thermal paste.

2) Power supplies are unpredictable animals. Bad power supplies can hide their faults if they stay plugged in all the time. One way to test if it's dying due to a bad capacitor is to shut your PC down and unplug the power cable, leaving it unplugged for at least a minute. If your PC doesn't respond immediately after plugging it back in and pressing the power button, then your power supply could be on its way out. The way to know for sure is to pull it, open the casing, and perform a physical inspecton of the capacitors. DON'T TOUCH ANYTHING INSIDE THE POWER SUPPLY IF YOU DO THIS. YOU CAN GET SHOCKED. If you see any capacitors with the tops starting to form an upward convex curve (bubbling) or if they have any corrosion on top whatsoever, then they're bad. Some people would say that you should have a higher wattage power supply for your hardware profile, but opinions differ on this.

3) Electrical short in the system. This one is harder to track down, but a lot of times it has to do with the way the motherboard is mounted to the case. Replacing metal mounting screws with plastic mounts is one way to fix this. Shorts can happen from almost anything, so the best thing to do is unplug EVERYTHING (including removing your RAM and any peripheral cards), check the connectors, and solidly reseat everything back into place. Double check the connections from any front panel items and the power switch to the motherboard, especially for any USB ports or card readers. Make sure you touch the metal of the computer case to expel any static charge you may have before touching anything in the computer.

4) Bad or loosely connected power cable. Sometimes it's just that simple. Some power supplies have sockets that are ever-so-slightly wider and the power cable never quite sits right. It'll always be a little loose no matter if it's in all the way or not. The easy way to fix this is to wrap the end of the power cable that inserts into the power supply with some electrical tape. It just happens to be the perfect width.

5) Bad wall outlet or power strip. It's rare that an outlet will fail on a decent surge protector or power strip, but if it's been abused you never know. Bad wall outlets, however, are a common occurrence. The only way to know is to buy an outlet tester. It's a small and handy tool that tells you if the outlet wiring is correct. They only cost $5. Everyone with electronics of any kind should have one of these, whether they live in a new house, old house, or apartment. If you value your gear, NEVER trust any outlet without testing it first. When you plug it in wiggle it up and down a few times to see if the lights blink on and off. If they do then you have an outlet that's shorting out (even if it's wired correctly).

6) Bad house or building power. To test this you need a multimeter. A cheap one is around $6-10 and will work fine. Power from your common 110v wall socket usually ranges between 118v and 122v, and it's not a set constant. You'll see the numbers fluctuate depending on what you have running on the circuit and there will be noticeable dips and spikes. Generally speaking, if you see your voltage dip under 117v or spike over 125v, you may want to move your PC to another circuit or buy a power conditioner. If you see your lights dim when the compressor in your refrigerator kicks on, that's a voltage sag. If they stay dim until the compressor turns off after a few minutes, that's a brownout. Either of those occurrences can permanently damage your electronics depending on the severity of the voltage drop.

Good luck, and hope this helps.


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#7
June 5, 2015 at 11:21:15
Hello again,

First of all, riider, that is my computer. Ill verify if the power supply is faulty.
Also, I don't think that my cpu, mainbord or gpu are overheating. My cpu runs at approximately 50 degrees celcius and my gpu runs at about 90. Ill pop open my pc and take a look at the power supply, though. Thanks a lot for your help.


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#8
June 5, 2015 at 12:51:43
Please note that the CPU temp is a little bit warm if you are at idle but not unreasonably so but your GPU is very warm and unless you are gaming or doing any video intensive things in the background, is not good. My CPU (i5 4690K) and GPU (GTX750Ti) are both around 28 degrees C right now (HWMonitor) and the machine has been in light use for a number of hours. Granted I built the machine with strong cooling in mind, but a stock factory gaming machine should be able to maintain an idle temp of mid 30C to low 40C. Is anything overclocked? What is the graphics?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
June 5, 2015 at 12:59:00
Oh sorry, forgot to mention. Those temperatures were while I was playing Borderlands 2. :)

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#10
June 5, 2015 at 14:58:58
A quick update: I checked the power supply, its doing alright, but my computer has stopped shutting down. It simply freezes now. The sound cuts out, and the display freezes. The fans shut off and there is no way to bring it back.

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#11
June 5, 2015 at 15:06:08
How many sticks of RAM have you got installed?

If the freezes are frequent enough try removing one and running the PC. If freezes still occur try swapping it out and running another until you have been through them all.

To rule out the graphics card do you have access to another GPU? Looking at the motherboard specs there's no onboard video?

Edit: You can also try running MemTest or Windows own Memory Diagnostics Tool to see if they find any problems with memory.

message edited by btk1w1


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#12
June 5, 2015 at 20:10:25
What graphics card do you have?
What is the Amperage Rating on the 12Volt Rail(s) from the sticker on the side of the power supply? What is the make and model number on the power supply?
When is it freezing? Is it while gaming or anytime?
What are the temps just before it freezes? What are the temps at idle?
These are all needed in order to fully evaluate your problem.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
June 5, 2015 at 20:54:13
Fingers.

1. I have a Geforce GTX 550 ti, sold by Gigabyte

2. I don't quite understand. Ill just send you the sticker as a picture. (you can view the sticker on the store page below. (Computer liquidators)

3. Its a x-supply JSP-450P08N. http://www.computerliquidators.ca/x-supply-jsp-450p08n-450w-power-supply.html

4. It is freezing when running anything, but never left alone. It can freeze up during games, while streaming a video on youtube/netflix/any other source, even running word. But it never freezes if I leave it alone, so its not just random.

5. My temperature at idle:
GPU: 47 degrees C
CPU: 21 degrees C
And several temperature monitors on my mainboard:
1: 27 degrees C
2: 46 degrees C
3: 37 degrees C

6. MAX temperatures when crashes occur:
GPU: 99 degrees C
CPU: 50 degrees C
And the three on my mainboard:
1: 30
2: 67
3: 65

Thanks,

Sean.


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#14
June 5, 2015 at 20:55:27
Btk,

I ran the memory diagnostic, and there are no issues with my RAM.


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#15
June 6, 2015 at 03:43:26
I think your graphics card may be one of the problems :

Thermal and Power Specs
Maximum GPU Temperature (in C): 100 C
Maximum Graphics Card Power (W): 116 W
Minimum System Power Requirement (W): 400W
Supplementary Power Connectors5: One 6-pin

Are there some extra fan(s) in the casing?
And a location with good ventilation?

The fluctuation of the "mainboard" temperature is high.
Either the GPU is heating up the motherboard or vise-versa...


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#16
June 6, 2015 at 05:22:50
✔ Best Answer
Your graphics card is running very hot and that is not good. As above, if the specs list the max for the card as 100C and you are showing 99C just before freezing then there is the reason for the freeze. As also stated, the temperature of the motherboard is rising at the same time, then we have to assume that your case does not have proper cooling.
Your link just brings me back to this page. I Googled your power supply, it is a very cheap model. They are not listing the detailed specs but I was able to zoom into the label and it shows the typical numbers I would expect of a cheap power supply, namely that the 3V and 5V rails show more amperage available than the more useful 12V rail. Your shows: 3V: 30A, 5V: 36A, 12V: 25A so that your 450Watt power supply is saying (if true) that it really has the power of a quality 300Watt power supply. This 'should' be enough for your system but you should consider replacing it with a much better model like this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
$40. but only $20. after rebate.

Please explain how many case fans your system has, where they are, the size of them, and the direction they blow (intake/exhaust), where the power supply is mounted (top or bottom), and where there might be additional fan mounts. It might just be that you need a better case fan with a much higher CFM rating. Case fans are not expensive and range mainly from $3. to maybe around $20. but the thing you will want to look for is one that has a high CFM with a fairly low DB rating (noise). Also look for a fan with the number of pins that match your motherboard (3pin or 4pin) and you can start with these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
I used their tools to locate those with high CFM, low DB, dual BB (my preference) to get you started.
That would be my first step and I would also replace the power supply which will also probably move more air out of your case than the smaller fan on your power supply as well as protect your system from issues a cheap power supply creates.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
June 6, 2015 at 06:40:08
As the others have stated, your GPU is running way too hot. And the EZCool power supply you posted is low-end junk. The Corsair 430W posted above by Fingers is a decent unit at a great price. It gets recommended in these forums all the time. I have 3 of them & have never had a problem.

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#18
June 6, 2015 at 08:53:41
Alright, the cooling system, now that I look at it is a bit crap. There are no fans, except the one on the power supply, (located at the top) which seems to be spewing out air. There are two more slots for fans, one at the front of the machine, (for air intake) and one at the back. They are both around 4 inches in diameter. I'll purchase the corsair power supply, and I will buy some new fans, one for air intake (at the front?) and one for air outtake. Also, I am looking to build myself a new rig, and I am wondering, what are the issues of having a low end power supply?

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#19
June 6, 2015 at 09:08:13
Also, in terms of power connections, I have one 4 pin and a 3 pin power connector on my motherboard. Which one should I plug into each?

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#20
June 6, 2015 at 20:55:22
The 4 pin type allows more exact speed control over the fan, CPU fans have used it for a long time, case fans using it are becoming more common. I would use the 4 pin one for the rear exhaust fan as long as the positions on the motherboard are reasonable for it and the wires will not have to run across everything or need lengthening.

The issues with cheap power supplies are multi-fold.
They rarely put out what they say they do.
They use high amperage on the less used low voltage rails because those are easier to achieve in order to claim higher overall wattage ratings but they are not usable power on modern systems.
They are low in efficiency.
They do not reliably deliver 'clean' power, especially when you use them at closer to their maximum capacities.
They tend to fail prematurely, often taking with them expensive components.
Their warranties are short and often the companies disappear or the companies themselves are in countries like China, India, etc. and there is no real warranty then.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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#21
June 11, 2015 at 20:53:16
Alright, So I bought a new fan, and the crashing stopped.
Thank you all for all your support, you were the best.

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#22
June 12, 2015 at 17:05:38
The important one is the rear exhaust fan to remove the hot air from the case.
The better power supply is also important though I do not know if it is still on sale. If that is not the rush, look around for the specials like the one I posted and get it when you can. If you plan on an upgrade build or an upgrade on the graphics card, then consider their 500W model. They are not the only good ones out there but you cannot go wrong with any of the Corsair models I have seen out there.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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