computer says too many password attempts

December 16, 2010 at 17:03:30
Specs: Windows XP
I have a Dell computer with XP professional OS, from old company i worked at. They closed down, and hard drive is in frozen mode. How can this be bypassed or reformatted.

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#1
December 17, 2010 at 12:17:16
have you tried popping out the HD and slaving it to anotherPC and reformatting it?

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


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#2
December 17, 2010 at 12:22:50
Is this by chance a laptop computer?

Stuart


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#3
December 18, 2010 at 09:00:33
If this is a laptop there is a chip in the hard drive that holds the password.
If a desktop then it can be formatted.

The cost of making the laptop hd usable usually out weighs the cost of a new one.


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#4
December 18, 2010 at 09:29:35
You are only allowed to enter the wrong password a small set number of times. When a message appears like that, usually you can reboot the computer and you will be able to try other passwords the same max number of times.

If this is a laptop, if you must enter a password to access the hard drive, the password info is stored both
- on a data area on the hard drive that cannot be accessed with almost all programs,
- and, if the laptop is less than about ten years or more old, also on a soldered in chip on the mboard that is not the bios chip that cannot have it's user data erased from it by removing the power to it.

If you're telling the truth, your best bet is....
Contact someone who used to work at the company you worked at to see if you can find out whoever would know the password that was used - e.g. the network administrator or another technician.
If you can find that out, then you can remove the password.

If you can't find that out
- you can't re-format the passworded hard drive on any computer. Even if you could, the password info is stored on a data area that is not erased when you re-format the drive.
- if you were to use a hard drive with no password in the laptop that had a passworded hard drive previously and that password is unknown and was not removed, you won't be able to access the new hard drive
- if you were to use a hard drive with no password in the laptop , AND replace the mboard with a used one that has no passwords enabled, then you can use the hard drive and the laptop , no problem.
......

There are companies that can remove the password info from the harddrive, but their services don't come cheap, and you would still need to replace the mboard with one that has no passwords enabled on the subject laptop.

E.g.

A company in the UK that can remove hard drive passwords from certain laptop hard drives for 49 pounds, or any other laptop hard drive for 149 pounds. The drive must be shipped to them. It appears that the rate does not include shipping charges.

See Response 3
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
......

There are other illegal ways to remove the passwords, but the rules of this web site forbid us from telling you about those.


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#5
December 18, 2010 at 12:53:01
if you were to use a hard drive with no password in the laptop , AND replace the mboard with a used one that has no passwords enabled, then you can use the hard drive and the laptop , no problem.

That is probably the only way. I would bet dimes to donuts the poster may have abandoned this post and gone elsewhere online to find a crack....that is..IF he is telling the truth about the origin of the laptop

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


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#6
December 18, 2010 at 13:51:00
"I would bet dimes to donuts the poster may have abandoned this post and gone elsewhere online to find a crack....that is..IF he is telling the truth about the origin of the laptop"

It's usually the case that the person who started the subject about an unknown system access password or hard drive access password never posts here again in the same subject.
I've seen all sorts of reasons for why they claim they don't know the password.The only thing you can be fairly sure of is they're not going to say they know the laptop or the laptop hard drive is stolen, or that they're trying to access a laptop or laptop hard drive that they shouldn't have the right to access.


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