Solved Computer is shutting down out of nowhere and randomly

December 9, 2016 at 15:16:38
Specs: Windows 10
I have a custom made computer desktop

The specs are:

AMD FX(tm)-8350 Eight-Core Processor 4.20 GHz
16.0 GB of RAM
64- Bit System
NVIDIA GTX 970
Temperature is 75 C

Power Supply is mounted at the bottom, led lights at the front.

This has been happening for a while, and it's been getting annoying lately. It happens randomly, searching the web, being idle, and sometimes (but not alot) when gaming.


See More: Computer is shutting down out of nowhere and randomly

Reply ↓  Report •


✔ Best Answer
December 9, 2016 at 20:46:49
Follow the instructions to remove and reapply the thermal compound:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods...
On a new machine with the temps that high when browsing you have too little, too much, or otherwise incorrect application of the thermal compound.
Assuming you are giving core temps, the heat sink the appropriate sizing and is properly tied down, and the other cooling is proper for the case.
Just in case: You should have a 120mm to 140mm exhaust fan mounted high up in the rear of the case. That is the basics and all you should need. You CAN use a front intake fan (note the direction of all fans, intake vs exhaust) of 120mm which will add to the air flow over the hard drives and towards the video card. You CAN since you have the bottom mounted power supply, add a second exhaust fan to the rear of the top of the case if the case has the option (120mm to 140mm). If the case does not allow the second exhaust fan you can go with a dual ball bearing, high CFM rear exhaust fan instead of the single regular fan. Period. You should NOT use a side fan since it disrupts the smooth air flow over the components and causes pockets of warm air to remain stagnant.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
December 9, 2016 at 15:58:10
75C is a little cosy. Was the thermal paste applied "exactly" in accordance with the CPU manufacturers recommendations? I'm assuming that everything including the heat sink is reasonably free from dust.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
December 9, 2016 at 16:28:32
Temp is high! Is that in idle condition?
Check your cooling system. Did you put the heat paste between CPU and cooler properly? Any extra exhaust fans in the box?
Is it shutting down or immediately powering off?

Reply ↓  Report •

#3
December 9, 2016 at 17:33:47
It's immediately powering off

It's actually 72 C right now, and i am just on the web.

message edited by CrimsonSaber5g


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 9, 2016 at 20:46:49
✔ Best Answer
Follow the instructions to remove and reapply the thermal compound:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods...
On a new machine with the temps that high when browsing you have too little, too much, or otherwise incorrect application of the thermal compound.
Assuming you are giving core temps, the heat sink the appropriate sizing and is properly tied down, and the other cooling is proper for the case.
Just in case: You should have a 120mm to 140mm exhaust fan mounted high up in the rear of the case. That is the basics and all you should need. You CAN use a front intake fan (note the direction of all fans, intake vs exhaust) of 120mm which will add to the air flow over the hard drives and towards the video card. You CAN since you have the bottom mounted power supply, add a second exhaust fan to the rear of the top of the case if the case has the option (120mm to 140mm). If the case does not allow the second exhaust fan you can go with a dual ball bearing, high CFM rear exhaust fan instead of the single regular fan. Period. You should NOT use a side fan since it disrupts the smooth air flow over the components and causes pockets of warm air to remain stagnant.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
December 10, 2016 at 16:57:37
"It's actually 72 C right now, and i am just on the web"

Classic symptom of improper heatsink/fan installation. Follow the instructions posted by Fingers.


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
December 10, 2016 at 21:09:18
Just as a reference, my Devil's Canyon is running at just over 30C and it has been on since 7AM this morning (it's Midnight). You should be able to get it down to the low 40C's at idle.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
December 12, 2016 at 16:11:34
Do you think that's the reason? I feel like it's a driver error or something, and it's making the computer shut off like that.

Reply ↓  Report •

#8
December 12, 2016 at 17:41:22
If it is a driver error, you should get Blue Screen stating driver error and shortly after that a restart if auto-restart is set.

Reply ↓  Report •

#9
December 12, 2016 at 17:59:35
Overheating is the most common reason for shutdowns and the temperature you gave in #3 is high for just being on the web.

Have you reasons for thinking it is a "driver error or something else"?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
December 13, 2016 at 12:29:38
I've changed multiple graphic cards without wiping the D drive, but ill tried adding another fan and see what's up. Thank you.

Reply ↓  Report •

#11
December 13, 2016 at 21:05:01
I doubt the extra fan is going to help unless you have a poor one currently. You probably have to remove the heat sink, clean the surfaces off and reapply the thermal compound making sure that the heat sink settles immediately into the exact position with maybe a tiny bit of rotational shifting to align and lock it down.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#12
December 16, 2016 at 11:16:52
Okay, I thought it was a software problem ( I checked event viewer, and saw registry errors and such when it shut down) so i reset my C drive, and reinstalled windows. In the middle of installing my window updates, GeForce drivers, and speedfan, it shut down also. It also happened again. I finally got Speedfan, and it said how my temperature of the Core is 80 C, I know it's hot, but do you think it's a failing power supply??


EDIT: It also is freezing up on me a lot now.

message edited by CrimsonSaber5g


Reply ↓  Report •

#13
December 16, 2016 at 14:27:37
Is there some reason why you don't want to believe this issue is down to overheating, even when an 80 C reading is being given?

The overheating should be sorted out first and most likely that will fix it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#14
December 16, 2016 at 14:50:23
Please note that I have donw some overclocking so I am always monitoring temperatures when doing this. I have had an old Pentium4 that ran up into the 60C occasionally but that CPU was notorious for running hot and I was overclocking it in a factory case with stock cooling. I ran Core2 CPU's E7500 & E8200's overclocked for years and they never ran above the mid 50C's under load. My current CPU i5-4690K I have not overclocked yet as it is fast enough but it idles in the low 30C's and has never went above the mid 40C's. Overclocked I would tolerate temps at idle in the low to mid 40C's and mid 50C's under load. I would never run a CPU daily in the 60C's let alone above 70C except for testing or to find the limits of a CPU (which I tend to stay away from).
You REALLY need to deal with your temperature issue as I have laid out above and AFTER that we can help you deal with any remaining issues.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#15
December 16, 2016 at 15:42:57
Ok thank you, i am just afraid if it isn't a temperature issue, it would be the power supply, because then i'd have to buy another one. I'll clean out the thermal paste, and add new ones, thanks for the help. I'll get back when I get the results.

Reply ↓  Report •

#16
December 16, 2016 at 16:00:33
Fine but do it exactly according the CPU manufacturers recommendations. Too much or too little paste will cause overheating.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#17
December 17, 2016 at 17:29:16
Okay, I opened the computer and turned it on to see that the heatsink fan wasn't working. So i reapplied thermal paste, and then replaced the fan, and instantly the temp. went down 20 C, so far no shutdowns. Thank you for all that helped me! I'll check back in soon.

Reply ↓  Report •

#18
December 18, 2016 at 08:05:06
Sometimes I wonder why people post questions in these forums if they're not going to believe the answers they're given, especially when multiple responses ALL suggest the same solution. It took over a week, but I'm glad you finally listened.

"i reapplied thermal paste, and then replaced the fan, and instantly the temp. went down 20 C, so far no shutdowns"

So what is the temperature now? You said it was 80C before, if it's down to 60C, it's still too hot. Did you completely remove all the old thermal material from the top of the CPU & bottom of the heatsink? And then clean them both with alcohol or acetone? AMD CPUs use the "middle dot" method of thermal paste installation. It should NOT be spread. It spreads out on its own when the heatsink is locked in place.

This is all that was needed: http://media.bestofmicro.com/therma...


Reply ↓  Report •


Ask Question